Ambassadors

Posted 12-30-2010 at 08:14 PM by brewanothercup

About a month I get an email from a friend who has seen pictures I post on my public blog or facebook and noticed that we breastfeed, cloth diaper, and babywear (yes, I know a lot of people having babies!).  They want tips, suggestions, and feedback on their own experiences thus far. It’s funny to think that six months ago, before my son was born, I knew nothing on these topics and now they are so embedded in my life it almost feels as though they’ve always been there.

Diaper Swapers

Silhouette Craft Cutting Machine Giveaway!

Posted 12-28-2010 at 05:27 PM by Juan M

This contest is now closed.

Like to or dream of crafting? Love scrapbooking, card making, vinyl wall decorations, or awesome clothing designs? Want to create your own business?

…well, I have the machine that will excite the socks off of you: the Silhouette SD. It’s a digital craft cutting machine that allows you to customize and design a variety of different products; be it from home decor, or custom made fabrics and apparel, to paper crafting. Think a Cricut type die-cutter, but on steroids. Like a printer, it hooks up to your computer. You simply open the Silhouette program that comes with the machine, create your image or text, and hit the “cut” button. Whola! It comes out your Silhouette machine and is ready for you to turn into something fantastic!

Winter Emergencies, Part 2

Posted 12-27-2010 at 05:37 PM by ParamedicMama

Once the snow starts to fall, a whole new set of 911 calls begin at the ambulance I work at. Instead of worrying how we’re going to carry a 300 lb. person down 467 stone steps in the local gorge, we start to worry about getting a person out of their car that’s upside down in the icy creek, or the hunter that’s lost in the sub zero degree weather. In many instances, winter emergencies can be more dangerous than emergencies that happen in other times of the year simply because there isn’t as much light, travel isn’t as easy, and the cold is a very real enemy. While we all hope that our family is never the one affected, sometimes it is, and it’s best to be prepared. This is the second in a two part series dealing with the two major emergencies seen in winter and will focus on house fires.

The rate of house fires increases during the winter because more heating devices are in use and are often not kept up to standard, thus increasing the risk of catching fire. While most of the time house fires can be prevented, they still do happen and cause great damage when they do. Preparation is the biggest key to preventing and surviving a house fire, so use this guide to make sure that your family will be safe in case it happens to you.

Before a fire begins

  • Make sure your house number is VERY visible on both your home and mailbox. So many times, we are delayed in reaching a medical patient or a burning building because we can’t see the house number!
  • Buy home insurance and correctly install and maintain smoke and carbon monoxide alarms throughout your home.
  • Once a year, go through your home with a video camera so you can know what you had for insurance purposes. Store this video along with other important documents and valuables in a fire proof safe. Place the safe in a particular corner of your basement so that you would be able to find it amidst debris.
  • Copy precious family photos onto a CDrom disc and into that safe.
  • Practice crawling under the smoke, leaving the home, and going to a predetermined safe location with your entire family.
  • Keep your shoes near your bed. I have gone to many fires where the family had to stand outside in the snow without shoes on. Just make sure you put them on after you’re outside where it’s safe instead of taking the time to do it inside before you leave.
  • Keep your home free of major clutter, and stack papers tightly. This will help the firefighters navigate through your home easier, and will also decrease the “fire load”, or amount of things in a room that can catch fire. Since oxygen is required for something to burn, tightly stacking things or putting them into containers will buy you more time before they will catch fire.


During and After a fire:

  • Get everyone out safely and don’t go back in. Yes, we’ve heard that a lot of times, but a lot of people also break the rule.
  • Tell the fire department as soon as they arrive that everyone’s out, and if there are any pets or firearms/ammunition inside. Also tell them how the fire started and its location (if you know).
  • Find a warm and dry place to stay while the fire’s being put out.
  • Call a friend to go buy sandwiches and hot drinks for the firefighters. Trust me, they’re going to be there for hours, probably aren’t getting paid, and really appreciate free food.
  • Remember that possessions can be replaced.

It’s All About Perspective

Posted 12-26-2010 at 10:47 AM by brewanothercup

Picture this: It’s Friday night, and you go to bed around 9 pm because you’re hoping to catch up on some sleep. At 5 am the next morning baby is bright eyed and bushy tailed, so to speak, and ready to roar through the day. Sound familiar?

‘Tis the Season

Posted 12-23-2010 at 07:45 AM by brewanothercup

Last weekend we brought our little one to see Santa for the first time, and afterward my husband dragged me to pick up the latest of our “Baby’s First Christmas” holiday collection. He had a tiny ornament engraved with our son’s name and the words: “Best Gift EVER!”

We’ve found ourselves saying that more and more lately, and to have it engraved timelessly on a holiday reminder is perfect. Someone will ask us what we want for this holiday, and we’ll kind of shrug and change the conversation. We don’t need anything. The baby doesn’t need anything. We have all we could want: a home, a family, our health, and a precious baby.

Winter Emergencies, Part 1

Posted 12-22-2010 at 07:14 PM by ParamedicMama

Once the snow starts to fall, a whole new set of 911 calls begin at the ambulance I work at. Instead of worrying how we’re going to carry a 300 lb. person down 467 stone steps in the local gorge, we start to worry about getting a person out of their car that’s upside down in the icy creek, or the hunter that’s lost in the sub zero degree weather. In many instances, winter emergencies can be more dangerous than emergencies that happen in other times of the year simply because

Caesarean: Planning for the Unexpected

Posted 12-13-2010 at 06:37 PM by brewanothercup

Like a lot of first time moms, I anxiously awaited labor. One day I’d envision a beautiful labor, with photos reflecting the calmness on my face and the joy of my son being put on my chest immediately after birth; the next day I pictured chaos and panic as the doctors urged me to push to save my son. It was torment, going back and forth, and though I knew the statistics for c-sections were high (approximately 30% here in the U.S.), I never really thought I would be one of the statistics.

In my case, we got within minutes of a caesarean at least three times. My doctors were adamant they didn’t want to do one unless it was absolutely necessary. After a diagnosis of pre-eclampsia, four days of labor, and four hours of pushing, they finally decided it was a fundamental necessity and off we went.

Easy Additions to Eat Healthier

Posted 12-7-2010 at 05:30 PM by ParamedicMama

With 2010 coming to a close in a few weeks, many of us are starting to think about ways to shed a few pounds in the new year. While the first thing that often comes to mind when considering getting healthy or losing weight is exercise or cutting back on the amount of food you eat, an easier (and maybe healthier?) thing to help you reach that goal is actually to add certain foods into your diet. Healthy eating can sometimes be as simple as substituting or adding something to a recipe which increases your nutrition and cuts back on less desirable things. Substituting healthier items for

Cloth and the Workin’ Mama

Posted 12-2-2010 at 03:54 PM by brewanothercup

When I told people I wanted to cloth diaper, several people flat out laughed (husband included, but that’s another post – he’s now a huge cloth fan!).  While people were supportive of what I call “my crunchy ways,” they thought that once the summer was over and I was back at teaching the demands of a full time plus job would outweight the cloth diapers and we’d be back in disposibles.

As it turns out, cloth diapering has fit into our working schedules just fine. We have about thirty diapers (and a ton of pre-folds/covers as at-home backups) and between home and daycare we wash every other day. As soon as I get home, I throw a load in for a cold rinse.