But Where Do I BUY Cloth Diapers?

Posted 06-26-2014 at 08:05 AM by Banana Cat

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You’ve decided to start using cloth diapers, part time or full time, for one or several reasons. Congratulations, and say good bye to all of your money, because cloth diapering can get pretty addictive pretty fast. Well, it doesn’t have to be addictive, but more often than not you’ll start hearing those trendy prints calling out your name and you’ll find yourself reaching for your wallet. If you can resist the temptation, well, double congratulations! For the rest of us with weak willpower, here are some places to buy cloth diapers:

Online

As this article is being published on a website called Diaperswappers, it only feels right to start off my list with the “online” option! Most people are connected to the internet these days and indeed, if you live in an area without any fancy stores this might be your only option! Sites such as Diaperswappers provide an online marketplace where members can buy and sell used diapers. It’s not as gross as it sounds; as long as the diapers are washed well they are good to be used on your child! The advantage to buying used diapers is that they are often cheaper than new diapers, so you can get a decent deal. If you are savvy with a sewing machine, some members list old diapers in need of repairs for just a couple of bucks per diaper, so if you are able to put in a little bit of time repairing these old diapers, you can get some amazing deals!

If you’re not so keen on used diapers, or if you’re buying friends some new diapers for a baby shower, then there are many, many cloth diapering stores online to choose from. All of the major brands such as bumGenius, Blueberry, Fuzzibunz, etc., have their own websites you can purchase diapers directly from.  There are also many online cloth diaper boutiques which sell dozens of brands—great if you want to try a few different brands all at once— and also have their own customer rewards programs, often offer free shipping over a certain purchase amount, and have “extras” such as cloth wipes and liners you can buy as well.

Diaper Swapers

The “Plain Jane” Cloth Diaper Stash

Posted 06-19-2014 at 10:39 AM by Banana Cat

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Cloth diapers are addictive.

Many people, mostly people who don’t use cloth or don’t have kids, will stare at you blankly when those words come out of your mouth. For heaven’s sake, they are diapers! It’s easy to understand buying an entire clothing line of baby clothes you think are adorable, or several of the same cute blankie because you know a few will get lost as the years go by. But…diapers? They’re just diapers, right?

No. They are not just diapers. They are diapers made out of mind-controlling, obsessive magical fabric that spurn you to open your wallet the second your favorite cloth diaper company comes out with a new line of prints, sending you running to grab the mail a few days later, throwing the diapers in the wash and the packaging in the recycle bin before your spouse can come home so they don’t realize you’ve bought EVEN MORE DIAPERS. This crazy obsession with cloth diapers has led to people spending hundreds of dollars on a single hard-to-find, highly sought after print (these people make far more money than me, by the way).

If you’re on a budget, or are afraid of getting caught up in the obsessive side of the world of cloth diapers, then a “Plain Jane” stash might be for you. The definition of a plain cloth diaper stash is a little different depending on the person, but it is basically a simple stash without the hundred-dollar prints or dozens of different types of diapers. For many people, it is a stash of flats and prefolds with some white covers. For others, it might be a stash of 25 white all-in-ones. Still others might have 30 tie-dyed prefolds and a couple of wool covers. Plain stashes can cross over with minimalism, so if you don’t have a lot of space or you just hate having “extra” things lying around (no 100-diaper stashes for you!), this might be something to consider.

Help! My Cloth Diapers Are Stained!

Posted 06-16-2014 at 12:14 PM by Banana Cat

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It will probably happen at some point. In my case, it happened the very first time we cloth diapered my tiny newborn daughter—your child poops, you run the diaper through the wash, and it comes out stained! Many people feel gypped the moment this happens. After all, if you have 12 fancy all-in-one diapers that cost $25 each, you will probably panic a bit—they were SO expensive! The Internet swore they were top of the line diapers, and after one use they look used and gross! What to do? (Unless you’re one of the mysterious minorities of parents online who claim that in their nine years of cloth diapering, they’ve left dirty diapers lying around for days before washing and never had a single stain. In that case, you can go on washing your diapers in your magic washing machine and send the magic our way.)

The Truth About Hard Water

Posted 06-13-2014 at 10:57 AM by toneylarson

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It sucks.

How do I know we have it? I don’t. It’s what people tell me when I say the dishwasher leaves spots all over my dishes. But now I know the great evil that is hard water because my daughter has a diaper rash. WHAT? How could a cloth diapered, adorable baby have a diaper rash that won’t go away with all-natural creams, healthy diet changes, and teething remedies? Hard water. That’s how.

For all I know, I grew up with hard water. I couldn’t tell you the difference. But I do know that the house we just moved from and the house we now live in have very different water.

As any cloth diaperer discovers, every-so-often the diapers need to be stripped or deep cleaned to get out residues left from detergents, oils, and the ammonia smell that can occur. In our last home, we did it every couple of months with Blue Dawn Original detergent and an Oxyclean soak to knock out that ammonia.  It’s always been successful. We use a detergent for everyday use that is made out of equal parts Oxyclean, washing powder, and baking soda that hasn’t given us any trouble. We were careful not to use too much to avoid build up and I was quite proud of our routine. Then we moved.

Different Types of Diaper Inserts

Posted 06-11-2014 at 11:01 AM by Banana Cat

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So… after months of agonizing over diaper types you’ve decided to use pocket diapers with your child. Or, you know, you just randomly used one and was like, “Hey, this is a cool diaper, I’m going to buy a bunch of these now.” The pocket diaper covers, or “shells,” are all constructed pretty much the same. There’s a layer of PUL on the outside and a stay-dry inner such as microsuede or fleece on the inside (and a very few pockets have cotton velour as an inner lining too!). Every brand is shaped a little differently, or has different snap configurations, but this is the basic construction of a pocket diaper. The true differences in each pocket diaper are what’s stuffed into the pocket.

Why I Cloth Diaper

Posted 06-4-2014 at 12:18 PM by toneylarson

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When I was pregnant with my first daughter, I asked myself all the questions a new parent asks, from what crib to breastfeeding to parenting styles. Among these questions was, “What kind of diapers should I use?”

I’m a traditionalist and I liked the idea of cloth diapering, but when I asked around, I was met with a lot of negative information.

It’s expensive.

It’s so dirty!

You use so much water!

It’s so complicated! All those pins and folding.

Many older moms, like mine, had tried cloth diapering with their first born. My own mother recalls that she came to America with her only suitcase stuffed with my brother’s cloth diapers. But when she discovered the miracle that was disposable, she said she threw out cloth and never looked back.

My dreams of cloth diapering were shattered and I went with disposable. Sure, they worked, but we were constantly running out at awkward times, often in the middle of the night. Our daughter grew out of the infant ones immediately, and it wasn’t long before she grew out of the next size up, leaving us with half a pack of newborn and a quarter pack of ones. Save them for the next child was the general advice, but with us living in a one bedroom apartment, storage was sacred. It was frustrating to have precious space taken up by out grown diapers.

When we were pregnant with our second daughter, my husband got out of the military and we were suddenly unemployed. I tried to potty train my daughter, but she stubbornly refused to do it, even though she had proved capable of it when she was in the mood for a treat. We reevaluated our finances and wondered if cloth was still a way to go.

All in One Soakers: To Detach or Not?

Posted 06-2-2014 at 11:17 AM by Banana Cat

When searching for “the best” all-in-one type diaper, you will probably come across an alphabet soup of: OBGE. As much as I’d love a diaper pronounced “Aw-buh-guh,” because that’s pretty much the sound that constantly comes out of my kids’ butts, “OBGE” stands for Original BumGenius Elemental.  Really, it should probably be “obGE” as the official name of the diaper is the original “bumGenius Elemental,” but let’s not get too picky here.

The original aw-buh-guh diaper is beloved by many, many parents. The colors are fun and bright and it’s very absorbent. However, the inner lining is made of organic cotton, and then to boost the absorbency there is a strip of folded over cotton going down the center of the diaper. This isn’t the only all-in-one diaper constructed this way, but it’s the most well-known, which is why I am using it as my example. The issue is that the inner strip of cotton is attached to the diaper at both ends. When the diaper is fully unsnapped, this isn’t a problem. But since the Elemental is a one-size diaper with snaps to adjust the fit, when you snap the diaper down to a small size, that inner cotton strip often bunches up. You can kind of fold it down to lay a bit flat, but sometimes your child wiggles around and then it looks like he or she has a lumpy butt under his or her clothing. And it’s probably not too comfortable for the kid to be sitting on, either. What’s the solution to diapers like these?

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Cloth diaper manufacturers are super creative and have figured out many, many ways to have a partially detached soaker on an all-in-one diaper.

Preparing a Caretaker for Cloth Diapers

Posted 05-16-2014 at 11:39 AM by Matrivine

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It could be you are about to have a hospital stay or go out of town. It could be that your nanny has never had the honor of working with cloth diapers and you need to prepare her to do it herself before your maternity leave is up. Whatever the reason it’s important to prepare those who will be caring for your little ones as their own to do so as you would.

Diaper Storage

One of the first things I did was help my caretaker understand how my snap diapers snapped together. I did this by having her fold and snap them after I had put them through the wash. I let her figure out how to fold them to make them smaller and place an insert in each before putting them away in the changing table. This gave her a chance to figure out how they assembled long before she needed to put them on my child. I showed her where the soiled diapers would be stored, and in case she needed to wash them, what detergent I used for them along with dryer and washer settings I prefer to wash them on.

The Training Pants Dilemma

Posted 05-14-2014 at 03:40 PM by Banana Cat

Shortly before her second birthday, my daughter became intensely interested in using the potty. She followed us into the bathroom to watch us go. She started pulling at her diapers after she peed. She sat on her little plastic potty and read books. One day after watching my husband use the bathroom, she ran around naked pretending to pee standing up with various “Wissssssssssssh!” sound effects. It was really the perfect time to start potty training her.

Her brother didn’t agree. I went into labor with him on my daughter’s birthday and all thoughts of potty training went out the window for all of us. I suppose it was for the best, since she probably would have regressed with a new baby in the house anyway, but I was slightly irritated at having lost the “window of opportunity” to train her. A couple of months later, when the water bill showed up and we were somehow shocked at learning that cloth diapering two full time uses much more water than only cloth diapering one full time, I bribed my daughter onto the potty with a couple of M&Ms (no judgment!) and suddenly, boom, she wanted to use the potty! Now that I had forced open a new window of opportunity, I found myself with another issue—what kind of training pants to use?

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If you thought choosing cloth diapers from the millions of types available was hard, I’m sorry to tell you there are just as many types of training pants out there!

Cloth Diapers and Chaffing

Posted 05-5-2014 at 03:07 PM by Matrivine

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Cloth diapers are wonderful before a little one starts to crawl, walk, run, and climb. As soon as our children start moving, however, whether it’s in the creases of the legs and pelvic region or on their thighs where the diaper rubs, children get chaffing and rashes. In some cases this can lead to yeast infections and a great deal of discomfort for our mobile tot. How do we prevent this discomfort?

Hygiene

Bathing a child everyday goes a long way to reducing chaffing and infections. It gets any product used on the child off as well as any lingering waste and the acids that come with it. Even if you have a child that only bathes every other day, it is good to allow them to soak their lower body for a while each day and then dry them off completely. Use this time to inspect your child and determine what action needs to be taken, whether it’s a switch in diapering products or calling a pediatrician just in case.

Nudey Time

I know many moms who are okay with letting their child go a few hours a day in their birthday suit. This works best if you have a fenced in back yard. For many of us in apartments, however, this can be almost impossible. We don’t want our children urinating on the floor or thinking that nudity is appropriate for the public.