Selling Your Cloth Diapers

Posted 11-12-2014 at 11:54 AM by Banana Cat
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This is a typical picture you might see attached to a diaper-selling posting. Nothing fancy, but it does the job!

There is a large market for used cloth diapers. If you’ve never thought about using used cloth diapers before, your initial reaction might be: eww. I mean, I wouldn’t buy used underwear. And diapers take a heck of a lot more punishment than underwear.

However, unlike most modern cotton underwear, cloth diapers can hold up to some hardcore cleaning. A couple of good washes and some bleach and cloth diapers are basically as good as new (assuming your washer or dryer doesn’t catch fire and char everything to a crisp in the process; unlikely, but always a vaguely potential possibility when working with electrical appliances). The advantages to buying and selling used cloth diapers are many: when you buy used, you save more money than you would buying new diapers, you will want to wash them but you don’t need to prep them six or seven times before using them, and you can try different diapers for cheaper than it would be to buy them all new. Once you’re finished cloth diapering, you can sell off your diapers to make back some of the money you spent buying them. Don’t think that just because your diapers might have holes or stretched out elastics that they’re unsellable—many thrifty people look for cheap, worn diapers that they can repair themselves, if they happen to be handy with a sewing machine! But where should you sell these cloth diapers once you’re done with them?

As you are currently reading this article on a website called Diaperswappers.com, you may have guessed that this website is one place to sell your diapers, and you’re right. Diaperswappers has several forums and subforums you can sell your diapers on. You can also use sites such as Craigslists or Facebook to sell diapers locally, if you’re not up for paying for shipping diapers across the country (or even internationally!).

Diaper Swapers

Toddlers Sleeping In Cloth Diapers

Posted 11-10-2014 at 11:40 AM by Matrivine

sleeping baby
It can feel like the absorbency of your cloth diapers decreases as your child grows from infant to toddler. That’s not really true. It’s just that the deluge of bodily fluids a toddler can unleash on a cloth diaper is so much more. Toddlers use more energy, water, and space and as a result your cloth diapers just don’t hold as well. This is particularly true during bedtime, but with a few tweaks to your nightly routine, doesn’t need to be a problem.

The Bedtime Changing

Cloth diapers should be changed right before everyone’s bedtimes. Once, right before your little one goes to bed and once before you go to bed. This is to limit the amount of saturation and uric acid your little one’s sensitive skin is exposed to. Multiple night changes also helps your little one stay comfortable and increases the chances for a better night sleep for all parties involved.

After The Breast – Feeding Toddlers

Posted 11-6-2014 at 08:40 AM by Matrivine

Little boy in a chief hat sitting on a floor

When feeding a newborn it’s easy to pick the menu, especially when you’re breastfeeding. After the first six months however, it’s not quite as simple. Our little bundles of joy demonstrate that they have preferences when it comes to what is put in their mouths. They graduate from breastfed and immediately become picky eaters. Here are a few tips on how to get your new picky eater to eat.

What’s In It For Them

No, I’m not talking about bribery, although I was tempted for a while. In my quest to get my little one to eat I tried everything from disguising healthy food to making airplane and choo choo noises while manipulating the spoon. My little one, though quite entertained by my sound effects, still refused to eat. The answer to getting him to eat actually came when we were watching his favorite PBS show together, in the form of a song. The basic message of the song was we need to try different foods because we might like them. It occurred to me that my little one needed to see what was in it for him if he tried something new. What’s in it for him is he might actually enjoy the new food. As a result I can at least get him to eat one bite of any new food and have been able to expand his food tastes like that.

Upcycling Your Cloth Diapers

Posted 11-5-2014 at 09:00 AM by 2+2macht4

clothwipes

We all know that babies grow like a weed. While your cloth diapering days are limited, many cloth diapers and accessories can be upcyled for multiple uses extending their life far beyond the days of wrapping baby’s bum.

Prefolds and Flats:

A super frugal diaper in and of itself, prefolds have so many uses long after their diapering days.

  • Prefolds, especially newborn or preemie size,  can be cut and modified into mama cloth. A variety of tutorials can be found on Pinterest.
  • They make awesome all purpose cleaning rags, no more worries about staining up those pretty unpaper towels.
  • They can be used as reusable swiffer or mop pads.
  • Pillow/couch/car seat/you name it protectors. When kids get sick the results can be gnarly. Lay them down as a barrier to catch any yucky messes.
  • Convert into hotpads for the oven

Wool: Beyond Diapers

Posted 11-3-2014 at 11:45 AM by Banana Cat
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These are the softest, cutest Disana overalls ever (I mean, I’m sure the fact that my son is adorable helps). Like, I’d give up chocolate for a year to buy a million pairs of these in every color.

Wool is well-known as an (often pricey, but not always) alternative to standard PUL diaper covers that dominate today’s modern cloth diapering market. There’s plenty of resources about wool covers out there. One funny thing is that once you get addicted to wool covers, both long and short, you might start wondering what other wool is out there. Some people make ridiculously awesome wool pants or wool skirts that work great as diaper covers, but also as a cute piece of fashion in and of themselves. If you start thinking you might want some more wool in your child’s wardrobe, the good news is that there’s plenty out there to choose from! Read on to learn more.

Breastfeeding a Teething Baby

Posted 10-31-2014 at 08:11 AM by Matrivine

teething baby
Breastfeeding can take a turn for the worse once your little one starts getting those little chompers. Don’t lose your cool when they start exploring what these new oral additions do while you are trying to feed them. Instead, try some of the following suggestions.

Be Firm 

Should your child bite your firmly tell them no. Don’t use your scary mommy voice, but do use a deeper tone that will get your child’s attention. Even if you feel they don’t know what you are saying this will put you in the habit of responding calmly and firmly. Eventually they will know what you are communicating.

Remove Your Child From The Breast

The best way to show your infant that biting is not an accepted behavior is to remove your child from your breast for a minute or two. The negative consequence will eventually help your child to avoid the action that causes it. They want to eat more than they want to bite you.

Breastfeeding and Cloth: A Prepper’s Point of Veiw

Posted 10-30-2014 at 08:53 AM by Matrivine

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We just addressed “prepping” diapers. But what about being a “prepper?”

I promise you I am not one of those crazy people that is building an underground bunker in her back yard. Still, I admit to being a preparedness junkie. I like to know that if we ever get snowed in, or if the power goes out for a while, we have what we need to still live comfortably. Cloth diapers and breastfeeding fit right into my prepping plans.

Less Trash

For one thing, if we are home bound for a while there is a good chance that the garbage pick up trucks may not be running during that time. One thing that you don’t want building up in your home are stinky diapers. In a home where disposable diapers are being used that’s just what could happen. Using cloth diapers aren’t just about being eco friendly, in an emergency situation they can be a sanitary problem. As long as you have an electricity free washer and soap, they can be soaked, washed, and reused. There won’t be old soiled diapers laying about the place you are living.

What on Earth is “Prepping” and How Do I Do It?

Posted 10-29-2014 at 07:53 AM by Banana Cat

If you’re new to cloth diapers, or have been using secondhand diapers for a while and are just now buying your very first brand new cloth diaper, you might have heard that you need to “prep your new diapers in the wash before you use them.” But what does that mean?

“Prepping” sounds a bit like some new dumb social media meme, and it’s kind of tempting to just run up to random strangers and ask them “What do you think prepping is?!” and hopefully get some hilarious answers, but here’s the real one: it’s necessary because new cloth diapers are… new. I know, I know, this has been an extremely informative blog post so far.  You must be stunned at the extent of my knowledge concerning such things. But factory-fresh cloth diapers, both cloth and synthetic, should be washed at least once before using them. They might have random residue from the factory or bits of packaging stuck on, and really, I’ve just always thought it a good idea to at least give things a good rinse before putting them on for the first time.

If you have synthetic-inner diapers, like microsuede-lined pocket diapers, one wash is all you need. Your diapers are ready to go! But if you have brand new natural fiber diapers or inserts, such as cotton or hemp, and especially ones made with organic unbleached cotton, you will need to “prep” them before they can be used.

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A deliciously quilty pile of freshly washed prefolds.

Mom Knows Best: Tricks for Flying With a Toddler

Posted 10-24-2014 at 03:21 PM by Rasha

traveling with toddler

Packing used to be the part of the trip that you dreaded the most, but that’s all changed now that you have a toddler. Now, packing seems like the easy part when compared to the tall task of keeping a toddler content on a plane. Maybe content is even too much to ask. Most of us would simply settle for a plane ride without scowls and dirty looks from passengers because your kid is throwing a tantrum, playing too loud or playing with the long hair of the lady in the seat in front of you. Here are some tried and true tips to keep your little one in good spirits for the entire flight:

Consider the Schedule

While long flights are challenging, layovers extend your travel time even more, so book a direct flight if you can. Less connections means getting back into some semblance of your little one’s routine a little faster, so it’s usually worth spending extra money if necessary.

Tutorial: Homemade Threading Board

Posted 10-22-2014 at 02:53 PM by Banana Cat

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So I like to sew. I have a cheap plastic sewing machine, and what feels like a 5000 lb vintage cast iron sewing machine, and between the two of them I can usually sew whatever I need to, unless it’s something like a king size quilt, because we don’t have room for a quilting machine in our apartment because dumb things like the stove and refrigerator are in the way. But, sometimes I need to hand sew something a little more delicate, or I’m just way too lazy to clear off the dining table and yank out the sewing machine and all the STUFF that goes along with it. One day, I was repairing a small hole on the seam of a sweater by hand, squinting and remembering that once long ago I wore glasses and whatever happened to them anyway?, when my 2 year old came over and asked what I was doing.

“Sewing up a hole in Mommy’s sweater,” I explained.

She stood up tall and declared in the way of two year olds, “Ok. I sew too.”

Now what? I had some large, dull embroidery needles and some yarn. Sewing/threading boards are all over the place—wooden or plastic boards with large holes in them that kids can practice sewing on—but we didn’t have one. So, I put my sewing aside and declared that it was now time for an art project.

Supplies