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Greenwife 11-05-2012 12:16 AM

handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
At a farmers market today we passed a woman with a birthmark on her face. Two year old DD pointed and said "Uh-oh".

DH was with DD and I was up ahead. They caught up to me and DH told me what she had said. He was in the process of picking her up to put her on his shoulders and continued with it saying something like "up we go". So he didn't apologize, not sure if he made eye contact with the woman.

What is the appropriate way to handle this type of situation?

Pyrodjm 11-05-2012 12:39 AM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
We usually play it off like your DH did. I pretend my child is talking about something else, play dumb or distract them. Dropping something usually works to distract everyone. DD1 was about to repeat an embarrassing observation about a lady walking toward us in a store. I dropped my wallet, ask DD to grab it and then quickly asked her to get something off of a shelf. DD lost her train of thought, The lady passed, I never had to even make eye contact with her and once we reached the car I explained to DD why we don't talk about the parts of people's body not covered by clothing, even if they should be. ;)

Nanner99 11-05-2012 06:53 AM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
Distraction is good. But if it is really obvious, I just explain out loud to said toddler. My oldest was the worst! She talked A LOT about a guy who sat behind us at an event who was covered in tattoos. I explained what tattoos were as nonchalantly as possible. The guy wasn't offended, he offered for her to take a look at his arm. Lol. Same with wheelchairs, I smile and explain it without embarrassment. Now, the "is that lady having a baby!?" comments (when no, the lady is not), are the hardest to deal with...

s@hmommy 11-05-2012 07:08 AM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
DD did this at Disney to a man that had severe burns scars. She just wouldn't shut up and he was sitting right beside me. I told her they were scars like she has from her stitches on her forehead, only bigger. He thanked us as we were leaving, he said most people try to pretend they (the scars) aren't there and that makes him feel more awkward because the kids star even more.

Angel89411 11-05-2012 07:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by s@hmommy
DD did this at Disney to a man that had severe burns scars. She just wouldn't shut up and he was sitting right beside me. I told her they were scars like she has from her stitches on her forehead, only bigger. He thanked us as we were leaving, he said most people try to pretend they (the scars) aren't there and that makes him feel more awkward because the kids star even more.

Ds2 isn't there yet but I took this approach with ds1. I would just try to explain it to him as simply as possible. I think it may have helped that I had a surgery when he was 10m old that left me wheel chair bound among other things. So he watched my life and appearance change. He has never asked many questions of this nature.

juliasmom 11-05-2012 07:46 AM

My 2 year old love to say "that lady has a baby in her belly" very loudly on a regular basis. She hasnt been right once and it embarasses the crud out of me!

EmsMom 11-05-2012 07:56 AM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
I try and be as honest as I can with them. It's tough as a toddler because they don't really get it. DD was born with a hemangioma on her forehead. Now at 7 it isn't noticeable but I still say to her "Would you like it if someone was pointing and staring at your birthmark"? She's pretty good about keeping her mouth shut.

ralenth 11-05-2012 08:02 AM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
We were in the mall one day when my oldest was little. He saw a guy in a wheelchair, and was just fascinated with the whole idea. I explained it to him as best I could, and the guy actually came over and answered my sons questions. It was actually a good learning experience for my son. Later, we were in a clothing store, and he saw a woman with an eye patch. Hollered "PIRATE!" As loudly as he could. Not so pleasant (the lady was not thrilled). After we left, I explained again, as best I could. I use those moments as teaching moments...

Greenwife 11-05-2012 08:22 AM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
A great idea to compare it to something she already knows, I'll do that if needed in the future. I have a birthmark on my thigh. I do want situations like this to be teaching moments and hope I can think of the right things to say to help the other person feel comfortable.

aemarques 11-05-2012 08:43 AM

"Pirate!" Hahaha sorry that is just so funny! I would have had a hard time not laughing. If I wore an eyepatch and a small child called me a pirate I'd laugh too, that's just cute!

I'd use most of the situations as teaching moments. Some you can some you can't. But you also can't control what comes out of a child's mouth, if a person is offended that's just too bad I think. Kids are curious.

Kiliki 11-05-2012 08:44 AM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
I try to just talk to them about it and not make a big deal about it in front of them, otherwise I worry they'll think it IS funny and then keep doing it.

The absolute WORST situations EVER are when my kids see mentally challenged people. I have a really difficult time knowing how to explain that to them, and, of course they aren't polite or tactful with their questions, so it only makes me feel ten times worse.

My DD asked a woman once, "Why do you talk that way?!" The woman can speak but her speech is difficult to understand. She also walks with a limp and has poor muscle control in her neck. Which made DD ask, "why do you walk funny?" Although she has full mental abilities, she just can't move/speak like "normal" and DD was genuinely curious.

It just kills me to think that she could be hurting their feelings, and TBH, I have no idea how to "correctly" explain that. Some ppl are seriously offended by words like "normal" "handicapped" "different" etc. and those are words I would use to try to describe it to my DD. So that leaves me totally baffled with how to even go about doing it. UGH. HATE those moments. But I also wish I could be better at teaching her.

MamaNae 11-05-2012 09:26 AM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
My dad has 1 hand, his other was amputated when I was very little. He's always handled it very gracefully with kids. They ask and sometimes he'll interrupt the parents and explain what happened.

My dad was electrocuted and he'll ask kids "Does your Mom or Dad tell you not to put stuff in the plug ins at home?" and they'll always say "Yes." and he'll say "Well I used to work with electricity and I got hurt very badly because electricity can be very dangerous. You be sure to listen to your mom and stay away from outlets." It might be overstepping but the parents usually say thank you...sometimes the kids will ask questions "Does it hurt?" "Well it did when it happened but it doesn't anymore." "Can you pinch things with that hook?" "Yes, give me your finger." and he'll lightly pinch it (never hurts, he does it to my kids all the time, they get a kick out of it). He tells them his hook lets him pick things up and helps him.

Anyway, I try to play it off or say something along the lines of "Yes, that man has scars on his face. He was probably in an accident. But remember, we don't point out peoples differences, it's rude. See how he's the same as Daddy/Grandpa/Uncle Bob? He has blonde hair just like Uncle B."

My youngest has taken to asking for Snickers when we're in Wal-Mart only because he's 2 he doesn't quite say it correctly...he leaves off the S and for some reason the CK sound sounds more like a G sound. That's a little embarrassing...

mekat 11-05-2012 11:39 AM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kiliki (Post 15897689)
It just kills me to think that she could be hurting their feelings, and TBH, I have no idea how to "correctly" explain that. Some ppl are seriously offended by words like "normal" "handicapped" "different" etc. and those are words I would use to try to describe it to my DD. So that leaves me totally baffled with how to even go about doing it. UGH. HATE those moments. But I also wish I could be better at teaching her.

Different isn't really offensive unless you use it in an offensive way. I would just explain that everyone is different. I would start with something simple like skin or eye color differences and then move forward with her brain/body or whatever works differently then yours and end with a positive spin on the other person's difference.

The only innocuous term I am offended by that most people don't think about is "What is wrong with him?" By someone using the word 'wrong' they imply my ds's differences are not acceptable and to me that is offensive but even then I tend to brush it off and ignore the unintended insult unless someone is really obnoxious and even then since my son is only 8 years old himself I usually wind up leaving quickly because I don't want him to see mommy get into it with a stranger.

Honestly, I only tend to really get in a snit over words is with reporters. As experienced word smiths I hold them to higher standard and expect them to be more thoughtful then the general public when representing the community with disabilities in print.

Steph Ed 11-05-2012 11:54 AM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by juliasmom (Post 15897497)
My 2 year old love to say "that lady has a baby in her belly" very loudly on a regular basis. She hasnt been right once and it embarasses the crud out of me!

Oh man!! That's not funny at all, but hilarious at the same time!!

momtojande 11-05-2012 12:51 PM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ralenth (Post 15897540)
Later, we were in a clothing store, and he saw a woman with an eye patch. Hollered "PIRATE!" As loudly as he could. Not so pleasant (the lady was not thrilled).

LOL! When DS was little he met one of my distant cousins. My cousin had a tooth missing in front; DS turned to me with this overjoyed smile and said "He looks like a pirate!" Luckily my cousin laughed. :blush:

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kiliki (Post 15897689)
The absolute WORST situations EVER are when my kids see mentally challenged people. I have a really difficult time knowing how to explain that to them, and, of course they aren't polite or tactful with their questions, so it only makes me feel ten times worse.

I've talked with my kids about this, because there were children with various disabilities at the daycare they went to. They had a lot of questions about one little boy in particular. The thing that helped them "get it" was to talk about how sometimes part of someone's body doesn't work quite right, like how their cousin gets severe asthma attacks because sometimes his body has a hard time breathing. I told them that the brain is part of the body, and if part of the brain doesn't work quite right it can make it hard for that person to do some things that other people can do. Not a perfect explanation by any means, but it satisfied them.

jen_batten 11-05-2012 01:12 PM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
An ounce of prevention, if you have the oppurtunity goes a long way toward preventing things like this. Kids are blunt, and sometimes they do shout it out anyway, but if they have been exposed to things or have experience in that area, they usually do a little better. My aunt has spina bifida. She uses forearm crutches and has some medical issues. The kids are used to being around her and we have talked about people's differing abilities so they usually know to wait and ask me a bit later so we don't hurt anyone's feelings.

Another awful parenting moment....there is almost no racial diversity here....so when my BIL saw an african american for the first time in a store he shouted "Look! A monkey!" I think he was two. What do you say after that?!?

jam's mum 11-05-2012 02:21 PM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
Fwiw, I think it's ALWAYS more embarrassing for the parents than the subject of the kids' surprise. Granted, I'm able-bodied, so I could be underestimating the hurt and offence, but IME, grown people don't mind when children aren't tactful.

I think it might be a more delicate situation when the person with a disability/weight issue/cosmetic irregularity is another child.

Kiliki 11-05-2012 02:27 PM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by momtojande (Post 15898812)


I've talked with my kids about this, because there were children with various disabilities at the daycare they went to. They had a lot of questions about one little boy in particular. The thing that helped them "get it" was to talk about how sometimes part of someone's body doesn't work quite right, like how their cousin gets severe asthma attacks because sometimes his body has a hard time breathing. I told them that the brain is part of the body, and if part of the brain doesn't work quite right it can make it hard for that person to do some things that other people can do. Not a perfect explanation by any means, but it satisfied them.

This is how I explained it after we got home. :goodvibes: And I stressed that if you talk about someone you can really hurt their feelings b/c it could be something they are embarrassed about.

Problem is, now they say, "aw, that person's brain doesn't work right mommy. :( " Somehow that is just so much worse sounding than "what happened?" ZOMG

:banghead: FAIL.

I'm biding my time until they are like 6 or 7. LOL

DD is almost 6 and she is starting to pick up really well on social queues, but now DS is becoming more aware of differences and he is totally NOT aware of social queues. By the time he is 6, my YDD will be turning 3 or 4, and we will start over again. And then when YDD is 6, YDS will be 4.

I foresee many years yet of awkward moments :lostit:

mmmom 11-05-2012 03:30 PM

My friends husband lost both his legs in a roadside bomb, he wears prosthetics. When my son met him for the first time when he was about 3 it was winter and friends husband was wearing shorts. My son looked up at me with the widest eyes I have ever seen and said "mom he's a robot"
My friends husband laughed so hard and to this day he jokes with kids explaining that since he was in an accident and his human legs didn't work anymore a doctor decided to give him robot legs.
My daughter called ever small Asian girl by her own name for a good 6 months when she was 18mos-2years. I had to explain that yes they had the same hair color, eye color etc as her but they were different children

My kids have commented on birthmarks in similar ways as you dd, my dd always thought they were hurt and would often be concerned saying "owie" over and over. I would explain that it wasn't an owie just a birthmark, I find if you are calm and honest then children will see that it really isn't a big deal.
Avoiding or lying to children teaches them that differences aren't to be discussed and I don't agree with that.

vatblack 11-05-2012 03:49 PM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
This is related but different, but please indulge me. When I was about 2, this must have been around 1973, we crossed the road every morning at the same time as a peace loving hippie with his long hair and beard. Apparently I piped up one day with: "Mommy is that Jesus?" My mother, of course, apologized and rushed me away with harsh words of how I should behave etc. The next day, however, he was clean shaven and his hair was cut!

I was in a tricky situation with DSD who commented on an amputee. I tried to explain by saying he might have been in an accident or something. He turned around and explained that he was an Iraqi vet. So, I explained later to her in more detail. I still feel bad about that day because I wish I had rather spoken to the guy, rather than about him. I think if I said: Excuse me sir, do you mind explaining to my daughter... etc. I mean, if they heard it already, what more is there to try and hide? I think he was more offended that I spoke about him rather than to him.

JennTheMomma 11-05-2012 03:55 PM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
Probably thought it was an owie. My ds2 thinks moles are owies. I would have just explained, they are just learning, and pointing out things is one of the ways they learn.

Palooka 11-05-2012 08:00 PM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
A few weeks ago my hubby took our 9 month old to the park and there was a family there he hadn't seen before. The folks in our neighborhood are very unfriendly (at least to us, we=poor, the rest of the neighborhood=rich, but I digress). Hubby saw this family with a 3-4 year old who was severely disabled and in a wheelchair. Our baby was fascinated with the chair and hubby took him over and asked if their son would mind if our baby said hi. The family was thrilled, after some chitchat they said they rarely go out to the park because it feels like the other adults and children just ignore them. They were very happy to have another child want to be near theirs. It was very touching, the parents even took a picture of our kids together.

This is why I love my hubby, instead of being embarrassed or trying to ignore the situation he made it into a kind and loving experience. :wub:

sandrc 11-05-2012 08:34 PM

My dd has a hemangioma on her nose. Every time we are In public someone comes up and says aw she hurt her nose. I even had one old woman scold me for letting my baby fall and get hurt when she was about 3 months old. Kids do comment but they usually ask what happened. That's no big deal. It's the adults that make me dumbstruck with their comments. I even had a distant relative comment the other night oh look she's Rudolph! What? Yes an adult really made fun of the way my 1 year old looks.

EmsMom 11-05-2012 09:02 PM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
When our kids were young (like toddler age) I didn't really try and go into the why's of a persons handicap/birthmark/amputation. I simply said everybody is different. Some people have blonde hair, some people have brown eyes, some people have light skin etc. DD has repeated this multiple times over the years lol. Now that they are 5.5 and 7 it's a lot easier to explain those things and why you shouldn't point and stare.

newmommy13 11-05-2012 11:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mekat

Different isn't really offensive unless you use it in an offensive way. I would just explain that everyone is different. I would start with something simple like skin or eye color differences and then move forward with her brain/body or whatever works differently then yours and end with a positive spin on the other person's difference.

The only innocuous term I am offended by that most people don't think about is "What is wrong with him?" By someone using the word 'wrong' they imply my ds's differences are not acceptable and to me that is offensive but even then I tend to brush it off and ignore the unintended insult unless someone is really obnoxious and even then since my son is only 8 years old himself I usually wind up leaving quickly because I don't want him to see mommy get into it with a stranger.

Honestly, I only tend to really get in a snit over words is with reporters. As experienced word smiths I hold them to higher standard and expect them to be more thoughtful then the general public when representing the community with disabilities in print.

Different is a good word imo because it applies to everyone. All people are different and some people are better at things than others. Some people run fast but dont know how to read and some people s legs work differently so they cant run fast but they read very well.

Quote:

Originally Posted by sandrc
My dd has a hemangioma on her nose. Every time we are In public someone comes up and says aw she hurt her nose. I even had one old woman scold me for letting my baby fall and get hurt when she was about 3 months old. Kids do comment but they usually ask what happened. That's no big deal. It's the adults that make me dumbstruck with their comments. I even had a distant relative comment the other night oh look she's Rudolph! What? Yes an adult really made fun of the way my 1 year old looks.

I agree, its the adults that are the worst offenders. So many people ask whats wrong and i will tell you every time my dd is perfect the way god made her. If you are curious (some people think its none of your business but i think more info normalizes disabilities) i would ask if she has a diagnosis. But like i said i am happy to share and some people arent.

Kiliki 11-06-2012 08:03 AM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by newmommy13 (Post 15901388)
Different is a good word imo because it applies to everyone. All people are different and some people are better at things than others. Some people run fast but dont know how to read and some people s legs work differently so they cant run fast but they read very well.



I agree, its the adults that are the worst offenders. So many people ask whats wrong and i will tell you every time my dd is perfect the way god made her. If you are curious (some people think its none of your business but i think more info normalizes disabilities) i would ask if she has a diagnosis. But like i said i am happy to share and some people arent.

It is really difficult to know - AS AN ADULT - how to handle these things properly. So many words aren't offensive to some, but are to others. How do I know what words will set off someone's crazy, and which will convey that I'm just trying to show concern and compassion for your child?

Is it EVER appropriate and okay for an adult to make ANY comment about your disabled/challenged child? And how on earth can we ever know what we are "allowed" to say if whenever we DO try to say something, it's "I can't believe they said that... Oh no she Di'int!!!"

It's a REALLY hard subject. Really. I often feel terrible when I see kids in wheelchairs or even worse when I see mentally challenged kids. What is okay and what is not? There's just no right or wrong answer. And some people are so angry over the situation with their kids, and so defensive of their children that NOTHING you say will be right.

So, I think sadly, THIS is what contributes to handicapped people being ignored largely. I'd love to be able to tell a mom at the park pushing her disabled child in a wheelchair how awesome and amazing it is that she takes her child out and about, and how it makes my heart feel happy to see that.... but odds are, I'll use some word that will make her angry, and instead of making her day, I'll just make her angry. :sadno:

I just smile from a distance and keep my mouth shut.

chandni3 11-06-2012 08:17 AM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
Just wanted to share my friend's story. This was when her daughter was about 9. They went to a wake and before going in she told her daughter, "If you have any questions wait until we get into the car and ask me them then." So they go and are in the line to give their condolences to the family and the man who has passed had a daughter who was covered in piercings on her face. My friend's daughter was staring and staring and then very obviously in front of the girl told her mom in a loud voice, "Mom I have something I want to tell you in the car" and then pointed at the girl. lol. My friend was so embarrassed.

Steph Ed 11-06-2012 08:40 AM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by chandni3 (Post 15901996)
Just wanted to share my friend's story. This was when her daughter was about 9. They went to a wake and before going in she told her daughter, "If you have any questions wait until we get into the car and ask me them then." So they go and are in the line to give their condolences to the family and the man who has passed had a daughter who was covered in piercings on her face. My friend's daughter was staring and staring and then very obviously in front of the girl told her mom in a loud voice, "Mom I have something I want to tell you in the car" and then pointed at the girl. lol. My friend was so embarrassed.

Kids! Lol!

Steph Ed 11-06-2012 08:50 AM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
When my kids were small I made a point to tell them about my dad, their grandfather, whom they ADORE! When my dad was about 2 or 3 he had an accident and sliced his eyelid on a coffee table. The doctor didn't sew his eyelid correctly, or something (a debate amongst his older brothers) so over the next couple of years his eye began to point outwards. Of course, growing up wasn't very pleasant at times for him. Bullied, ridiculed, etc.... So I told the kids about this and asked them if they thought Pappy deserved that, of course the reply no! So I have to say they have been very thoughtful and careful when it comes to delicate issues such as other's appearance or differences. Of course, kids will be kids (especially the little ones - they really just cant help it!) but I think since Pappy's story was so personal they understood better.

momtojande 11-06-2012 09:58 AM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by chandni3 (Post 15901996)
My friend's daughter was staring and staring and then very obviously in front of the girl told her mom in a loud voice, "Mom I have something I want to tell you in the car" and then pointed at the girl. lol. My friend was so embarrassed.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kiliki (Post 15899308)
Problem is, now they say, "aw, that person's brain doesn't work right mommy. :( " Somehow that is just so much worse sounding than "what happened?" ZOMG

:banghead: FAIL.

LOL! Yeah, can't anticipate everything they might do.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kiliki (Post 15899308)
I'm biding my time until they are like 6 or 7. LOL

DD is almost 6 and she is starting to pick up really well on social queues, but now DS is becoming more aware of differences and he is totally NOT aware of social queues. By the time he is 6, my YDD will be turning 3 or 4, and we will start over again. And then when YDD is 6, YDS will be 4.

I foresee many years yet of awkward moments :lostit:

The fun thing will be, though, that your older kids will share in the embarrassment when the little kids say those things!

Quote:

Originally Posted by jen_batten (Post 15898907)
Another awful parenting moment....there is almost no racial diversity here....so when my BIL saw an african american for the first time in a store he shouted "Look! A monkey!" I think he was two. What do you say after that?!?

Oh dear.

A friend of mine took her then-3 year old daughter to Target. They passed a wall that had the manager's picture and the little girl started pointing and loudly saying "look, it's Daddy!" My friend, her husband, and daughter are all white...who knows what goes through their little brains sometimes?

vatblack 11-06-2012 10:12 AM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
What I find embarrassing is when my DD calls every black man of a certain built and hairstyle "Shout" - as in Shout from The Fresh Beat Band on Nick Jr.! It became worse after she saw the band play live in April of this year. Ugh!

MsGiggles 11-06-2012 04:05 PM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kiliki (Post 15901948)
...
I often feel terrible when I see kids in wheelchairs or even worse when I see mentally challenged kids.
...
So, I think sadly, THIS is what contributes to handicapped people being ignored largely. I'd love to be able to tell a mom at the park pushing her disabled child in a wheelchair how awesome and amazing it is that she takes her child out and about, and how it makes my heart feel happy to see that.... but odds are, I'll use some word that will make her angry, and instead of making her day, I'll just make her angry. :sadno:

I just smile from a distance and keep my mouth shut.

My approach (on my own & with kids) is to generally approach a child with a disability like any other new child; wanting to meet them, play & get to know them better if they'd like that too. I don't go in feeling terrible for them, because I think that is making a lot of assumptions. Instead, aiming just to get to know them has worked pretty well and I don't think I've been offensive. (If you would be offended by my approach, please do let me know so I can get better, too!! :thumbsup:)

We've played with other children in wheelchairs, with leg/arm braces, with some other physically obvious differences, and just approached with an opening lines inviting them to play, appropriate to what they may be able to do. When DD1 has been curious, I've taken the approach of "Yes, they are different, and also a lot like you. Let's go meet them, maybe we'll make a new friend" at playgroups, parks, etc. Usually it's just the same difference part then "We can say hello to them, smile & wave" if it's at a grocery store or some place less open to meeting friends - sometimes it leads to conversation, sometimes just a wave, sometimes it isn't noticed or may be ignored (but that goes with the cashiers & old ladies we smile & wave to, as well).

I grew up with some exposure but no disabled children of my own (parents fostered babies with suspected or confirmed physical &/or mental disabilities & I volunteered with overnight Easter Seals camps as a teen), so I may have a different perspective, but I do feel comfortable around children & adults with disabilities.

I do enjoy the variety of children & board books there are that help bring these differences up so you can see & talk about it at home, too. I'm guessing some videos can help with advanced exposure, too.

misskira 11-06-2012 04:29 PM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ralenth (Post 15897540)
We were in the mall one day when my oldest was little. He saw a guy in a wheelchair, and was just fascinated with the whole idea. I explained it to him as best I could, and the guy actually came over and answered my sons questions. It was actually a good learning experience for my son. Later, we were in a clothing store, and he saw a woman with an eye patch. Hollered "PIRATE!" As loudly as he could. Not so pleasant (the lady was not thrilled). After we left, I explained again, as best I could. I use those moments as teaching moments...

:rofl: sorry this made me laugh.

Ds has a serious speech delay so we haven't had anything like this happen yet. The only thing was he saw a really dark black man and mumbled "oh no" under his breath. Like the man was hurt or something. Same he does for casts and crutches and things.


I'm a special Ed teacher and we take a plain and simple approach. Answer questions or talk about it in a matter of fact way, and encourage normal conversation with the person of focus.

Sha-nanagins 11-07-2012 08:40 AM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by vatblack (Post 15902444)
What I find embarrassing is when my DD calls every black man of a certain built and hairstyle "Shout" - as in Shout from The Fresh Beat Band on Nick Jr.! It became worse after she saw the band play live in April of this year. Ugh!

LOL! Back in the early 80s when Magnum, PI was one of the most popular shows on TV, I babysat a toddler whose minister father had wavy brown hair and a mustache, so a passing resemblance to Tom Selleck. Every time she was out in public and saw a poster of him displayed, she would start shouting, "Look! My Daddy!". Embarrassed us to death. Even worse, she was fascinated by tractor trailers, so would start shouting "Truck! Truck!" every time she saw one. Unfortunately, she couldn't pronounce the "Tr" sound, and would use "F" instead.

vatblack 11-07-2012 10:47 AM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Sha-nanagins (Post 15906098)
LOL! Back in the early 80s when Magnum, PI was one of the most popular shows on TV, I babysat a toddler whose minister father had wavy brown hair and a mustache, so a passing resemblance to Tom Selleck. Every time she was out in public and saw a poster of him displayed, she would start shouting, "Look! My Daddy!". Embarrassed us to death. Even worse, she was fascinated by tractor trailers, so would start shouting "Truck! Truck!" every time she saw one. Unfortunately, she couldn't pronounce the "Tr" sound, and would use "F" instead.

Oh that is so funny!

hac1224 11-07-2012 01:27 PM

Re: handling awkward toddler comments in public?
 
Just as others have said, I use them as teaching moments and take the time to explain things to my child in the correct way when they do something like that.


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