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-   -   Late talking children (http://www.diaperswappers.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1459231)

danielle 10-31-2012 08:31 AM

Late talking children
 
I admit, I am freaking out, just a tiny bit. My daughter spoke 100 words by 12 months. My 16 month old son speaks how many? NONE. He grunts and points. His receptive language is good. He is clearly a smart kid with an interest in his world and a good sense of humor. His ped said if at 18 m he's got nothing he will recommend an evaluation.

He seems to want to say words. He babbles for sure. My question is, is there anything I can do to encourage or help him to talk? Thanks.

Tina5834 10-31-2012 08:36 AM

I had fears about my 2nd's speech ad took him to the ENT. He said not to worry ad wait until he was 2.5 years and if after that he still wasn't speaking we would explore it further (all his hearing tests came back normal). Well, he hit 2.5 and now he won't **** up!!

aries416 10-31-2012 08:48 AM

My son is 2 and has about 30 words, but doesn't use them often. At 15 months, he had 5-10. He just got evaluated and is getting 30 minutes a month of therapy. This seems seriously lacking to me, but the ped. Is not concerned until 2.5. I know he's bright and he's probably a late bloomer. He doesn't need to talk because he's great at non-verbal communication and because my 4 yr old girl never stops talking! He's very tactile, still. I repeat things all day long and talk through my day with him. Most times he ignores me, but sometimes I get a word out of him. He's just stubborn.

qsefthuko 10-31-2012 09:03 AM

Re: Late talking children
 
Neither of my boys talk much as toddlers. Lots if grunts and babbling but few words. My now 16 month old can say diaper, mama, ahba(Robert), done, and nana. Except for mama he rarely uses the others. Even mama isn't used daily. My older son was similar. He did eventually get speech therapy but only because his sentences were short and to the point. Example, I go bathroom. Instead of, I am going to the bathroom. He would consistently leave out words such as the and it.

Bear Family 10-31-2012 09:06 AM

Re: Late talking children
 
OP, I was in your boat with my son (now 3). My daughter spoke very well, complete sentences people/strangers could understand at a very early age. Jax on the other hand it took him forever to talk. He would communicate, but not with words. Looking back, between myself, DH and his older sister, he didn't really feel the need to start talking because he could grunt, or point at something and it would just be provided. Also, I have heard that boys generally start talking later than girls, so that could be part of it too. Jax was almost 2 before he really started talking I wasn't really that concerned because like I said, he did communicate, he did learn, I could see the wheels turning in his head, but he just didn't talk. Most of my family was though, and at times, they made me think that there may be something wrong. My pedi was great and made me feel better about his late talking abilities, but if I was more concerned, and pushed the issue he would have went with it. If you truly feel in your heart that there is room for concern, then by all means, get him evaluated, but from my own expirence, it is not uncommon.

happysmileylady 10-31-2012 09:09 AM

Re: Late talking children
 
My kids are all late bloomers/talkers and so are all my brother's kid, and according to FIL, DH was a late talker also. My oldest had only 5 words at 18 months, my almost 4 year old had like 2, and didn't really start talking until she was 2.

My 2 yr old *might* have 3 words. Or, she might have MANY more that she refuses to say. Her receptive language is great, and she's a master at virtually all forms of non verbal communication, from physically manipulating your hands to get you to do what she wants, to communicating with body language, etc etc.

Generally speaking, everything I have read has said that if they ARE communicating (ie getting their point across most of the time) even if it's not verbal communication, and there aren't any other red flags that you are seeing (ie avoiding eye contact, etc) then there's most likely nothing to worry about. However, if you are worried for any reason, getting an eval from early intervention isn't a bad thing.

teachmetotalk.com is a website I have been to with some good suggestions. But basically, make sure you are reading to him (I am sure you are,) try to get him to say the name of something before you hand it to him (ie, try to get him to say ball before you give him the ball) and introducing sign language, even at this point, can all help.

abunchoflemons 10-31-2012 09:18 AM

Re: Late talking children
 
I think its like crawling.neither of my girls did til after they walked. Iwouldnt worry til yea like 2 to 3 yrs & if not saying anything. My girls walked at 7 & 8 months & a neighbor/friend kid not walk til about year.

mibarra 10-31-2012 09:23 AM

I agree with your ped, refer at 18 months if no progress. Some kids are late talkers, some have language delays, but by the time you find out by waiting, you have wasted months, if not years, of time they could have been getting therapy. And when it comes to language therapy, the earlier, the better. A SLP will be able to look at the whole picture and help determine which is the case. Most 2 year olds should have about 59 words, and be starting to put two words together.

I would do 2 things:
1) Talk about everything you do. Talk til you feel ridiculous. Talk and talk and talk some more. Comment on everything you see. It really helps.

2) See if he will learn some signs to communicate basic wants and needs, like eat, drink, more, mommy, ect.

Good luck!

Kiliki 10-31-2012 09:35 AM

Re: Late talking children
 
My ODD was the same as yours, OP. She had a LOT of words REALLY early. She could sign "milk" to nurse at 8 mos! Back then that was "normal" to me and other kids were "slow" ..... Oh how did I get schooled! My DS spoke at an average pace, and now my YDD is late talker. At 19 mos, she has maybe 10 words, all of which she has learned in the last 2-3 mos.

I was very concerned, but my ped said the same thing as yours. Turns out he was right, she just needed a bit more time.

And my YDD's words are weird, too. I can understand them and I know what she is saying but... for example... she says "Gah-Gnee" for doggy and "Gah-gee" for Daddy. She says "Spy-mah-man" for Spiderman :headscratch: and "Gig-gee" for Kitty. The only words that are really clear are "mama" and "poop" :giggle2: Figures. LOL

Each kid is so different. Try to be patient. Don't panic, just keep an eye out and try to encourage talking by singing songs, maybe let your LO watch some sign language vids (this helped w/DD's speech), read a few books here and there and point to things, before you hand anything to your LO, say "here is your ____!" (milk, food, cup, etc) Ask questions to try to engage them. You can say "are you hungry? Do you want to eat?" And then, whether they respond or not, say "Here's your food! MMMM! Let's eat!" and on and on and on about everything you do. It helps. But you do feel a bit whacky. LOL

L J 10-31-2012 10:06 AM

It's especially strange when an older sibling is far advanced in language and another seems to fall behind the curve.

Henry was speaking in complete, intelligible sentences on his first birthday. Everyone could understand him, strangers ever, not just family. He had 30 words at 8 months old.

His baby sister is 14 months and has about 6 words, though I may be stretching that a bit. She has 3 words that I'm certain of and the rest she says consistently in the same situation but aren't exactly words.

I have no advice, but I will say after having such an advanced talker it makes me worry more than a little.


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