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Old 10-03-2011, 11:53 AM   #11
Sha-nanagins
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Re: Are there still home ec teachers in school?

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Originally Posted by happysmileylady View Post
I suppose that depends on what you consider "Home Economics." When I was in school, Home Ec was a semester of sewing and a semester of cooking. At my daughter's high school, they have a whole category of electives called "Family and Consumer Sciences." It includes these classes
I am not sure it's good enough to be honest. The housing and interiors classes, the way I read the manual, are really just decorating classes. The personal and family finance course really seems to read like it's more geared towards special needs teens and helping them learn to live on their own. It may not be, the description was filled with a lot of fluff. There's a different financial course offered in the business categories called personal finance that seems much more like what you would consider a personal finance type of course. The child development and the foods courses look like what you would expect. Some things I wish they had were some sort of sewing/mending/knitting or other textiles type of course, a gardening course, that maybe dabbled in a bit of canning, freezing that sort of thing. Also, something with basic home repairs would be great-how to repair a hole in drywall, how to do some basic plumbing repairs, that sort of thing. THAT, to me, is the REAL home ec stuff. And its stuff that so many people just don't know how to do anymore. If drano doesn't take care of the clog, call a plumber.
LOL - remembering my Home Ec class during my sophomore year of high school! Yes, it was pretty biased - basically all the girls took Home Ec and the boys took "Shop" - but it was very practical! There were the standard units on cooking and sewing, of course, but we also had the guest teacher from one of the cosmetic companies do a unit on skin care and natural makeup (a/k/a how not to look like Tammy Faye Baker). I also very vividly remember the days we spent at the staircase having lessons on "Why ladies don't run up and down steps" (let's just say the view isn't very flattering), how to walk up and down stairs in high heels, and how not to trip and fall on your face when wearing a long dress. We even had a class on how to get in and out of a car in a skirt without showing the world your underwear preferences.
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