View Single Post
Old 01-20-2009, 02:30 PM   #1
Lucy van Pelt's Avatar
Lucy van Pelt
Registered Users
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 107
Help - does your toddler have multiple food allergies?

I am so frustrated by cooking and would love any tips from other parents dealing with the same allergies. How do you get them to eat the good stuff, especially if cooking is not your talent?

It totally stinks that my son can't eat milk, eggs, or peanuts. Yes, I already know to be grateful he isn't allergic to something even more challenging like wheat, or that the list isn't longer, and that we've been lucky he hasn't had a trip to the emergency room.

Two year old kids don't like a lot of stuff.
I didn't want to cook tonight, but I did and he ate two bites and refused the rest (pasta, ground beef and sweet potato - not very appealing, but usually he likes these foods and when you take away all the fun stuff that's what is left.) I could really just cry. All the time I spend around food is so wasted.

We can't keep peanut butter in the house. DH & I miss peanut butter.
I can't ever catch a break by making a grilled cheese or scrambled eggs for lunch or dinner.
Forget pizza (cheese) or chinese food (peanuts, peanut oil).

The allergy-free cookbooks are not geared at a 2-year old palette.
The vegan cookbooks always seem to include nuts in anything remotely appealing, especially peanut butter.
Nearly every recipe the Sneaky Chef uses to hide the veggies include cheese, eggs or peanut butter.

I can't ever shop just in one supermarket - I spend more time going from store to store, and money.
We eat meat more frequently than we want to because DS can't have cheese or eggs and it's not just for protein, it's to have something of substance in the meal.
When I do find a "shortcut" prepared food, it is always 3x as expensive because it's in a specialty store.
I always have to pack food if we're going out for the day because so few stores carry what he can eat, and restaurants are even more of a challenge.

I've never liked cooking but I really HATE everything about it now - shopping for food, thinking of what to do with it, cooking, and the endless cleaning up (I am getting a microwave to cut down on the dirty pots and pans when reheating leftovers.) And being stuck in the kitchen provides the perfect opportunity for DS to tear apart the apartment.

Is this just a cultural problem? I mean, in places where resources are limited, are the toddlers picky? I'm guessing they learn quickly, "eat X, because that's all there is." I never wanted to be a parent who fixes separate meals for the kid, but all his meals are special because of the allergies. And so much gets thrown out because it seems like there's a limit to how safe it would be to keep reheating the same food.

And yes, I was aware that cooking 3x a day was part of staying home - but it's not like we had chef when I was working, either. Cooking is so completely unrewarding.
Lucy van Pelt is offline   Reply With Quote