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Old 09-29-2012, 09:10 PM   #1
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What no one tells you about breastfeeding

I'm thinking about BF my next baby and I was just wondering about it. I want the good and bad please
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Old 09-29-2012, 09:44 PM   #2
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Re: What no one tells you about breastfeeding

all good, no bad. okay, not completely true...but the good SO HUGELY outweigh the bad, it's practically true.

bad: sore nipples for the first couple of months, it's difficult to get into a rythm for the first 6 weeks about

good: it's easier, especially at night: no bottles to sanitize, infinitely more portable, etc, it comforts your baby when nothing else can (including a bottle...nothing like being snuggled up to mom's boobies), it's so emotionally satisfying, it's healthier than anything for your baby, it's WAY cheaper than formula...what else? i'm sure i'm forgetting so so much.
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Old 09-29-2012, 09:52 PM   #3
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Re: What no one tells you about breastfeeding

It's okay to feed baby at the restaurant table instead of the bathroom.

Feeding bottles can cause supply issues.

No matter how natural breastfeeding is there is still a learning curve for both mother and baby.

OB nurses in general know little to nothing about breastfeeding. They just don't know how little they really know.

Doctors often seem to know even less.

A good lactation consultant can do wonders to help.

Look for La Leche League. Knowing other nursing moms can make you feel less alone.


A good pump is nice to have already. If problems arise you don't want to be looking with a hungry baby or have to give formula while looking.

I know of no effective way to prep the nipples although you may be told to do so.

Just because your little one can verbally ask to nurse does not mean he or she is too old to breastfeed.

Feeding on demand is not spoiling them nor will you have an obese child. Most breastfed babies will not overeat. Rolls are normal on babies. So too are leaner babies. Just like adults are all different so too are babies.

Breastfed babies need to wake at night to feed even up to a year of age or older.
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Old 09-30-2012, 12:05 AM   #4
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Re: What no one tells you about breastfeeding

Yes to all!!

It's not always easy, but it is well worth it! It took me having my second to know that nursing in public is fine! Now I do it anywhere. Even some nursing mothers don't know much about bfing. Don't be afraid to ask for help but think about whether or not the advice makes sense before trusting it.

While in the hospital with my first, my ob said that anytime I wanted to quit, I should give it another 24 hours. If I still wanted to quit then, I could decide then. My ds weaned himself at 15 months, and my dd is 12 months and going strong. It was good advice, for me at least!

Quote:
Originally Posted by qsefthuko View Post
It's okay to feed baby at the restaurant table instead of the bathroom.

Feeding bottles can cause supply issues.

No matter how natural breastfeeding is there is still a learning curve for both mother and baby.

OB nurses in general know little to nothing about breastfeeding. They just don't know how little they really know.

Doctors often seem to know even less.

A good lactation consultant can do wonders to help.

Look for La Leche League. Knowing other nursing moms can make you feel less alone.


A good pump is nice to have already. If problems arise you don't want to be looking with a hungry baby or have to give formula while looking.

I know of no effective way to prep the nipples although you may be told to do so.

Just because your little one can verbally ask to nurse does not mean he or she is too old to breastfeed.

Feeding on demand is not spoiling them nor will you have an obese child. Most breastfed babies will not overeat. Rolls are normal on babies. So too are leaner babies. Just like adults are all different so too are babies.

Breastfed babies need to wake at night to feed even up to a year of age or older.
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Old 09-30-2012, 12:18 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qsefthuko
It's okay to feed baby at the restaurant table instead of the bathroom.

Feeding bottles can cause supply issues.

No matter how natural breastfeeding is there is still a learning curve for both mother and baby.

OB nurses in general know little to nothing about breastfeeding. They just don't know how little they really know.

Doctors often seem to know even less.

A good lactation consultant can do wonders to help.

Look for La Leche League. Knowing other nursing moms can make you feel less alone.

A good pump is nice to have already. If problems arise you don't want to be looking with a hungry baby or have to give formula while looking.

I know of no effective way to prep the nipples although you may be told to do so.

Just because your little one can verbally ask to nurse does not mean he or she is too old to breastfeed.

Feeding on demand is not spoiling them nor will you have an obese child. Most breastfed babies will not overeat. Rolls are normal on babies. So too are leaner babies. Just like adults are all different so too are babies.

Breastfed babies need to wake at night to feed even up to a year of age or older.
This is amazing advice! The only thing I have to add is that breastfed babies *MAY* need to wake at night to feed as they get older. Our DS was sleeping through the night at 7 weeks and we only hit a few bumps while he was teething.


The first few days/weeks can be full of toe-curling, tear inducing pain, especially if your LO has a bad latch and no one has told you to check for a tongue tie (too common NOT to check with latching problems).

Cluster feeding is the BEST way to get a long nap or long stretch of evening sleep out of your LO. (our DS was sttn at 7 weeks)

It is SO much easier than bottle feeding. I know first hand because we supplemented EVERY feeding (even in the middle of the night) with a bottle for the first several weeks until his tongue was clipped. Stumbling around in the middle of the night thawing breast milk and trying to find a clean bottle is not fun - it's so much easier to just cuddle your LO in bed and nurse!

Babies are not born knowing how to nurse. My bff just had a baby girl and the nurse told her "she knows how to do it!" Well... 6 weeks of insufficient weight gain, cracked and bleeding nipples, and difficult feedings, it turns out she is tongue tied and wasn't latching properly. Babies - and mamas - have to be taught how to nurse well.

Once you get a rhythm established, there is not one single more convenient and rewarding way to feed your baby. There also isn't a way that is healthier, more complete, or more beneficial to their immune and digestive systems. My son is 16 months and has NEVER been to the doctor for anything except a well child visit.

ETA: a good quality pump was vital (to me) to have a good nursing relationship with DS. I needed a break every once in a while (or had a Dr appt) and DH needed to be able to feed him. It also allowed me to pump and donate to another baby.

Last edited by KelseyH; 09-30-2012 at 12:24 PM.
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Old 10-05-2012, 07:32 AM   #6
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Re: What no one tells you about breastfeeding

Quote:
Originally Posted by qsefthuko View Post
It's okay to feed baby at the restaurant table instead of the bathroom.

Feeding bottles can cause supply issues.

No matter how natural breastfeeding is there is still a learning curve for both mother and baby.

OB nurses in general know little to nothing about breastfeeding. They just don't know how little they really know.

Doctors often seem to know even less.

A good lactation consultant can do wonders to help.

Look for La Leche League. Knowing other nursing moms can make you feel less alone.


A good pump is nice to have already. If problems arise you don't want to be looking with a hungry baby or have to give formula while looking.

I know of no effective way to prep the nipples although you may be told to do so.

Just because your little one can verbally ask to nurse does not mean he or she is too old to breastfeed.

Feeding on demand is not spoiling them nor will you have an obese child. Most breastfed babies will not overeat. Rolls are normal on babies. So too are leaner babies. Just like adults are all different so too are babies.

Breastfed babies need to wake at night to feed even up to a year of age or older.
Could not have said this better myself!!!
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Old 09-29-2012, 09:56 PM   #7
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Bad- leakage problems, sore nipples, over/under production issues, time/leaving baby (pumping, engorgement from forgetting to pump, baby not taking a bottle), the first month, being a paci, nighttime waking a that never seem to end,

Good- breast feeding relationship, no formula to buy or prepare, lots listed in pp.

Good and bad vary for each bfing relationship. I listed all I could think of for bad but none of them occurred with all my kids. I've had 3 exclusively bf (bottles of bm count) and 3 supplemented with formula for convenience. One was bad enough at the beginning I almost quit but they all had months of a good bfing relationship.
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Old 09-29-2012, 10:19 PM   #8
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Re: What no one tells you about breastfeeding

Everyone is different. What's true for one woman may not be for you. Do not think you will have all the problems that other's have told you about, but nor should you expect it to be perfect.

Here's my, 'what I wish I'd been told':
After a few days, it hurts so bad that you'll cry when baby latches on. This lasts about a week or two. If you make sure that you get a good latch EVERY TIME, the soreness goes away faster.

If you have oversupply issues you'll have 'problems'. Constant leaking, especially in the first few months. You might even be able to squirt across the room. When nursing on one side you may soak through your bra on the other side even if you are wearing a breast pad.

My first child woke up every 3 hours at night for the first 6 months of her life, and then woke up about 2 or 3 times a night after that. My son started sleeping 5 to 6 hours stretches at less than a month old.

A good support system is super important. Don't give up because it's so very rewarding and worth it! It gives you the sweetest bonding moments you will ever have and nursing helped me to bond with my son after a traumatic birth experience. I LOVE nursing.
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Old 09-29-2012, 10:25 PM   #9
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Re: What no one tells you about breastfeeding

As a pp mentioned good and bad is subjective.

She mentioned using you as a paci but mama was there before pacis were invented. In some countries they are called dummies. You are not a substitute for the paci. The pacis are substitutes for mama. It is normal for babies to want comfort. For me I prefer they get that comfort from me and not a paci. For some mamas they feel tied down. For some it is the bad that you cannot pass the feeding on to someone else. For others this is a privilege.
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Old 09-30-2012, 12:22 AM   #10
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I second a lot of the other posts. It doesn't always hurt, though. Other than a newborn with a strong latch, mine never hurt. And even that was just at latch on.

The bad: (this might not be bad though) in that brand new stage - as in it happened when we were still in the hospital - you might fall asleep once baby is nursing. It might be a hormone thing, but as soon as he was nursing good, zzz.
No one else can get baby to sleep, and once baby is a little older, they won't be as willing to babysit a bf baby. But that also depends on your support system, are you an efficient pumper, etc.
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