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Old 07-02-2007, 11:29 PM   #31
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Re: WDYT are some causes for why breastfeeding and success rates are so lowin N Ameri

i really feel that my hospital experience had little to do with my breastfeeding success - yes the nurses were great but i did make my wishes clear and both my dds roomed in with me. I really don't understand how so many babies are getting snuck bottles of formula Why would you ever let your newborn out of your or your dh's sight?

I think a lot of the reason that women DON"T breastfeed or fail at it is because of "EXPECTATIONS". I can't tell you how many times that I have heard the "i don't make enough milk" so I can't breastfeed reason for why women give it up.....and I always ask how they know - and the answer varies from not being able to pump more than an ounce or having a newborn that nurses for over an hour or nurses several hours in a row on the hour and cries a lot and then is hungry again 15 min. later etc.....if only they knew that this is NORMAL and i tell women that but so many don't believe it cause they think they should only have to nurse ever four hours for 5-10 minutes a side and that their baby should be sleeping through the night by a couple weeks
And there are so many people that help to reinforce these beliefs and help to convince these woman that they indeed "aren't good enough" and "can't produce enough milk". People need to know that cluster feedings are normal and that YES, your one week old can nurse and be hungry 15 min. later, it's normal. (end of rant)
my best advice was from my mom who always says "just nurse your baby, she'll let you know if she's NOT hungry, otherwise just keep offering her the breast..."

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Old 07-02-2007, 11:35 PM   #32
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Re: WDYT are some causes for why breastfeeding and success rates are so lowin N Ameri

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i really feel that my hospital experience had little to do with my breastfeeding success - yes the nurses were great but i did make my wishes clear and both my dds roomed in with me. I really don't understand how so many babies are getting snuck bottles of formula Why would you ever let your newborn out of your or your dh's sight?

I think a lot of the reason that women DON"T breastfeed or fail at it is because of "EXPECTATIONS". I can't tell you how many times that I have heard the "i don't make enough milk" so I can't breastfeed reason for why women give it up.....and I always ask how they know - and the answer varies from not being able to pump more than an ounce or having a newborn that nurses for over an hour or nurses several hours in a row on the hour and cries a lot and then is hungry again 15 min. later etc.....if only they knew that this is NORMAL and i tell women that but so many don't believe it cause they think they should only have to nurse ever four hours for 5-10 minutes a side and that their baby should be sleeping through the night by a couple weeks
And there are so many people that help to reinforce these beliefs and help to convince these woman that they indeed "aren't good enough" and "can't produce enough milk". People need to know that cluster feedings are normal and that YES, your one week old can nurse and be hungry 15 min. later, it's normal. (end of rant)
my best advice was from my mom who always says "just nurse your baby, she'll let you know if she's NOT hungry, otherwise just keep offering her the breast..."
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Old 07-03-2007, 12:08 AM   #33
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Re: WDYT are some causes for why breastfeeding and success rates are so lowin N Ameri

I agree with whoever posted about how breasts are sexualized much more in the states than other places in the world. I also think the U.S. is fairly prude compared to other societies.

I am not sure how I feel about age. I am seeing a LOT of younger moms bottle feeding, but I am also seeing a LOT of younger moms BFing because its starting to be 'cool' again. I know I was a young mom and I BF.

Part of it is soon to be mothers dont see it all the time so it doesnt seem 'normal'. When I found out I was preggo with #1 my mother said "if you only do one thing I say, BF that baby" up until that point I hadnt even THOUGHT about breastfeeding and I can HONESTLY say that I dont know if I would have. Not because I had a problem with BFing but because its not something I would see. EVER. I would go to the mall and see moms with bottles. Come to find out, in Montana VERY few people make it BFing past 3months I wish I could remember the EXACT figure but I cant now. When I saw the % though I was in shock and made sure to ask if it was true, sure enough it was. I want to say it was something like 10%. I read that when I was 3 months preggo with DS, and my DD was 19 months and I was still nursing her.

Also, I think EVERY hospital should have a LC on staff. With DS I saw the LC right away(she was on staff at the hospital) and our BF relationship was GREAT. With DD there wasnt one on staff and I didnt want to pay her to come see me because I had "done it before" DD had the WORST latch and I had to have the LC come see me at a month PP because I was ready to quit. I was determined to make it, which is how I managed to go so long without calling, but I ALMOST gave up. She came and saved our relationship and we made it to 21 months. The beginning was rough but the end was good. With DS#2 I called the LC the second I was released from the hospital and had her come that night. I had to pay her out of pocket and insurance didnt cover it but I think help from a LC (or a very skilled nurse) is a HUGE factor in sucess rates. Sadly, I dont think enough L&D nurses know ENOUGH to support those who need it. I know there are some nurses who are trained well, but I think there are MORE who are not

I also think that the fact that formula companies are shoving formula in our face doesnt help either. My first DS was born on Labor day. Enfamil offered a free CASE of formula if you DC was born on labor day that year. We sent in for it "just in case we need it". I decided that it was haunting me and donated it to a womans shelter a few months later. Having that can(from the free diaper bag from the hospital) haunting you from the cabinets is never a good thing. "Oh the kid is crying and nursing isnt working, he MUST be hungry, I must not be making enough milk." and so the cycle starts. The more bottles you give, the less milk you make, then eventually you are exclusively FFing because you DONT make enough milk to keep up with your DC.

I have watched my neighbor. She is a first time mom, and she doubts her body ALLLL the time. Her DS gained weight GREAT from birth - 1 month and she was worried he wasnt getting enough. She came to me and asked if she should supplement, she was worried about his weight. I asked her how much he had gained, I then asked her about wet/soiled diapers. Everything checked out PERFECT and I told her "it sounds like you are doing a GREAT job making milk for your DC". I think she just needed someone to tell her all was well. It was after a doc appt, so it made me curious to think what he might have told her. I have heard stories(from around town) about docs coming into a room and not even ASKING people if they are BFing or FFing, just assuming they FF. Like "how many bottles a day are you giving" "how many oz of formula does your DC drink" and then they say "we BF" and the doc is caught off guard.

I still really think the biggest reason is because of how sexualized breasts are in our society.
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Old 07-03-2007, 12:05 PM   #34
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Re: WDYT are some causes for why breastfeeding and success rates are so lowin N Ameri

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I didn't read all of the posts:

1. B/c Americans have a lazy mindset
2. WIC is free
3. Marketing
4. Because women aren't empowered enough to believe in their bodies
5. Peer Pressure
6. Mom Pressure
7. Mom's just have to go back to work
8. Not enough support
9. Not enough good common sense
DITTO all of that!!
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Old 07-03-2007, 01:24 PM   #35
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Re: WDYT are some causes for why breastfeeding and success rates are so lowin N Ameri

I think the fact that so many women go back to work is a huge reason women don't start bfing, or stop too early. A mom at my old job pumped for her baby, and I was so impressed because it is a lot of work.
Also, it's just the culture - my mom nursed me and my sister, so she has been super supportive, but so many of that generation ff and were ff. My dh was ff and he kept "warning" me to not get my hopes up too high about bfing because he didn't want me to be disappointed if "it didn't work." Now, nearly five months later, he's so proud that it's "working" so well.
Also I agree about the lcs at the hospital - my hospital was plenty supportive of bfing, but dd was born on a Friday morning and I checked out Sunday and never had an official visit by an lc. The nurses were helpful, but even with all the help and reading and classes I had done to prepare myself, I wasn't getting dd latched far enough on and had a lot of sharp pain that first week. I made an appt. with the lc the next week (paid out of pocket) and it was awesome, best money I've spent (next to my cds!).
As for the culture, I do think the tide is turning, or at least it is in my circle. All the moms I know well have bf, or at least really gave it a go before giving up. In our birth class, out of 20 couples, all said they wanted to bf.
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Old 07-03-2007, 01:57 PM   #36
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Re: WDYT are some causes for why breastfeeding and success rates are so lowin N Ameri

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It's made out to be a personal choice, as if its an outfit that the mom is picking out or something. I think that our society needs to help women be accountable to their children, knowing that breastmilk will give them the best start in life.

Women also see it as this HUGE deal. What if I can't? What if I don't have enough? What if, what if, what if. I think sometimes we forget that in poor countries where there is no money for formula, the majority of babies are nursed without the huge host of problems we seem to have here.

The mind is a very powerful thing. If we could just see breastfeeding as a normal thing that everyone did, I think people would be less likely to think they could fail at it.
Yep.

I've had four babies, three in the hospital. I've NEVER met with a lactation consultant. I've also never been to an LLL meeting. I have successfully breastfed all of my children (had problems with my milk supply with my second but managed to hang on to pt breastfeeding until he was 11mo). I knew, before my first was born, that I would breastfeed. It was important to me! I read as much as I could and educated myself and was very prepared when he was born. Even with the fact that my mother and grandmother did not breastfeed, and I didn't know anyone who had or who was, I still managed to work through any issue that came up and successfully breastfeed.

The biggest problem in the US is not necessarily a lack of support or help (though it's certainly up there on the list!) - it's a lack of desire. Breastfeeding is so LOW on the priority list for SO MANY moms, that it's no surprise that we have such low success rates. Even for moms who 'plan to' breastfeed, they still have the mindset of 'well, if it doesn't work out, there's always formula'. Many will give up without even seeking help or information to try to correct whatever problem they may be experiencing.

I think second to the lack of desire/priority, is the taboo-ism of breasts. Moms don't want to call people and ask them for help with their *gasp* breasts! Getting help with breastfeeding isn't like having your teeth cleaned. The idea of calling for help and having someone come and see your bare breast/nipple and perhaps even have to touch it, is a bit beyond the 'comfort zone' for a lot of women!

I think next on the list is the lack of public support, lack of resources, and lack of education regarding breastfeeding. Honestly, there is A LOT available, but women have to SEEK it. Doctors get a nice kick-back from giving names and addresses of their patients to formula companies. Women start receiving formula ads, samples, and 'checks' in the mail by their second trimester of pregnancy. You open any popular parenting magazine and the pages are littered with formula ads from several different companies. Mom's don't get breastfeeding pamphlets in the mail when they are pregnant. They don't get Motherwear catalogs. They don't see ads in the magazines for breastfeeding or breastfeeding products.

The support in this country is only offered if the mother has already expressed that she intends to breastfeed. Here, we are so overly concerned with offending those that don't want to, that no one is willing to go out of their way to encourage those 'still on the fence' or who might be easily persuaded to give it a chance to do so.
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Old 07-03-2007, 02:12 PM   #37
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Re: WDYT are some causes for why breastfeeding and success rates are so lowin N Ameri

I never understood how a mom, barring physical problems of course, could not breastfeed until we spend a week at my inlaws last month. You would have thought I wanted to strip for all the harrassment I got about it.

Frankly, I think it's the formula companies' brainwashing during the last century. They got an entire generation, and part of two others, to believe that Breastmilk was not good for your baby. It's pervaded the entire society and it really sucks.

I think it's coming back around, but it's slow coming.
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Old 07-03-2007, 05:15 PM   #38
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Re: WDYT are some causes for why breastfeeding and success rates are so lowin N Ameri

When I had my last lo, I got a free bf support kit when leaving the hospital. It was full of formula & formula coupons & a special cooler bag for bottles. This was seriously called a bf support kit!
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Old 07-03-2007, 06:09 PM   #39
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Re: WDYT are some causes for why breastfeeding and success rates are so lowin N Ameri

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Yep.

I've had four babies, three in the hospital. I've NEVER met with a lactation consultant. I've also never been to an LLL meeting. I have successfully breastfed all of my children (had problems with my milk supply with my second but managed to hang on to pt breastfeeding until he was 11mo). I knew, before my first was born, that I would breastfeed. It was important to me! I read as much as I could and educated myself and was very prepared when he was born. Even with the fact that my mother and grandmother did not breastfeed, and I didn't know anyone who had or who was, I still managed to work through any issue that came up and successfully breastfeed.

The biggest problem in the US is not necessarily a lack of support or help (though it's certainly up there on the list!) - it's a lack of desire. Breastfeeding is so LOW on the priority list for SO MANY moms, that it's no surprise that we have such low success rates. Even for moms who 'plan to' breastfeed, they still have the mindset of 'well, if it doesn't work out, there's always formula'. Many will give up without even seeking help or information to try to correct whatever problem they may be experiencing.

I think second to the lack of desire/priority, is the taboo-ism of breasts. Moms don't want to call people and ask them for help with their *gasp* breasts! Getting help with breastfeeding isn't like having your teeth cleaned. The idea of calling for help and having someone come and see your bare breast/nipple and perhaps even have to touch it, is a bit beyond the 'comfort zone' for a lot of women!

I think next on the list is the lack of public support, lack of resources, and lack of education regarding breastfeeding. Honestly, there is A LOT available, but women have to SEEK it. Doctors get a nice kick-back from giving names and addresses of their patients to formula companies. Women start receiving formula ads, samples, and 'checks' in the mail by their second trimester of pregnancy. You open any popular parenting magazine and the pages are littered with formula ads from several different companies. Mom's don't get breastfeeding pamphlets in the mail when they are pregnant. They don't get Motherwear catalogs. They don't see ads in the magazines for breastfeeding or breastfeeding products.

The support in this country is only offered if the mother has already expressed that she intends to breastfeed. Here, we are so overly concerned with offending those that don't want to, that no one is willing to go out of their way to encourage those 'still on the fence' or who might be easily persuaded to give it a chance to do so.
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