Reply Hey Mom! Learn more about the Gerber Life Insurance Grow-Up Plan!
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-01-2012, 01:11 PM   #11
iris0110's Avatar
iris0110
Registered Users
seller
seller
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: N TX
Posts: 14,992
My Mood:
Re: S/O When did you start reading "real" books to your kids?

Picture books do have value, board books have more value as something children can enjoy on their own. However that being said my oldest did not like picture books as a toddler. He has always been a sensory child and the combination of picture and story was irritating to him. He could either have a board book (which he was just going to play with) or I could read him novels. From infancy I chose to read him novels. Every day at nap time I read him novels. I think it sprung form the fact that he had reflux and often slept upright on my body and I would read as he slept. It just evolved to me reading to him instead of "over him". The Harry Potter series was one of the first things I read to him but we read many other books in those early days. Everything ranging from Call of the Wild and Where the Red Fern Grows (books I loved as a child) to The Dalmark Quartet and The Never Ending Story. It was when Tharen hit the toddler stage that we made the switch to picture books. He wouldn't sit still through novels, not even part of a chapter. By then Kearnan could tolerate them and actually enjoyed the stories and pictures. There are some splendid picture books out there with wonderful stories and art work. Picture books are not the same thing as board books or baby books. They should use proper grammar and many if not most introduce some advanced vocabulary. The art can range from childish to quite beautiful (I have a problem buying anything with pretty artwork) and the stories help children work through the problems they face in their life from normal fears (like the monster under the bed or the first day of school) to learning to interact with other people and animals. The shorter length helps keep a child's interest and bring the lesson home. These days we read both novels and picture books. Every night at bedtime we work through a novel (back to the Harry Potter books, Tharen's first time and finally finishing the last books of the series that weren't out the first few times Kearnan and I read them) and during the day we enjoy our favorite picture books. Tharen also works on early readers and decodable books while Kearnan is reading simple novels on his own.

Advertisement

__________________
ShannonInk'd, Atheist, Liberal, Part Time Large Equipment Mechanic, HS-ing, Mum to ASD Ninja Kearnan (8-4-01) & Derby Boy Tharen (12-1-05)
Always remembering Arawyn Born Silently (12-21-03)
Crocheted longies/shorties, toys and more see samples Arawyn's Garden Crochet
iris0110 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2012, 03:53 PM   #12
JennTheMomma's Avatar
JennTheMomma
Registered Users
seller
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7,820
My Mood:
Re: S/O When did you start reading "real" books to your kids?

At 4 we started reading chapter books like Charolettes Web, Pinoccio, Jungle Book, etc. However, we still read books with pictures (Splat the Cat, little critter). I think it's important to continue to read those books because those books help kids read since they are bigger words and there isnt' so many on one page. ds1 started reading books like that at 4 also. ds2 we're still reading the regular toddler books (not board books though).
JennTheMomma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2012, 05:26 PM   #13
tazzae's Avatar
tazzae
Registered Users
seller
seller
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 1,006
My Mood:
Re: S/O When did you start reading "real" books to your kids?

My dd had a very long attention span for reading from a young age. Her first two word phrase (at about a year) was "read it!". By 18 months we were reading to her upwards of 3 hours a day--and she wanted more! I think we started chapter books around 2 years old. Dd was ready for the more complicated stories and language they offered.
__________________
Tara, happily at home with dd Rowan(4/04)
tazzae is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2012, 05:30 PM   #14
kelpie169's Avatar
kelpie169
Registered Users
seller
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Tampa Bay Area
Posts: 1,838
We started when our first was in the NICU. Harry potter. Then we laid off until he was about 2 and his brother was born. Then we started all kinds of chapter books. Harry potter, eragon, Alice in wonderland...our youngest was used to hearing them about a chapter at a time so he never has a problem. We change it up though. Sometimes we do "our" books and sometimes we read "their" books.
kelpie169 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2012, 05:32 PM   #15
mmmom's Avatar
mmmom
Registered Users
seller
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 2,112
My Mood:
I read Charlottes Web to my dd for the first time when she was about 3. We read 1-3 chapters a night. She read it on her own when she was 5 and now at almost 7 she reads Shel Silverstein

My son on the other hand is not a kid that has interest in anything with out pictures. We still read quality books but not anything that doesn't have nice pictures
__________________
lovin' preschool teacher, part time student Momma to... The Japanese Princess and her bigger little brother
mmmom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2012, 10:54 PM   #16
tallanvor
Registered Users
seller
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 13,313
Re: S/O When did you start reading "real" books to your kids?

Quote:
Originally Posted by danner View Post
I consider picture books to be real. If it has a plot, some tension, something happening, that is enough for me. I started reading those books to my daughter at 15 months (Beatrix Potter books, for example). Bear in mind though, that my daughter is probably off the charts advanced in matters of vocabulary and other reading-related activities. My son is 10 months and I'm still waiting for him to say Mama and mean it, whereas my daughter's first words (multiple) came at about 9 months.

I would urge anyone wanting to move their kid along prematurely to chapter books and away from picture books that you don't need to do that in order to get your kid to the next level. There are plenty of picture books out there with a plot and "big" words. I read an article somewhere that picture books are actually very good for preschoolers. Wish I could remember the source.

Anyway, I wish I could see into my crystal ball for my son. He doesn't have any patience for books yet. We have hundreds of board books due to our daughter's keen interest and he just takes them from me and either eats them or throws them. My daughter always sat there and turned the pages. Kids are all so different.
My sister and I were like your two. She was the oldest and loved being read to -- would sit for hours so long as you were reading to her. I, on the other hand, would maybe sit for 2 pages. But, I was reading on my own at 5 and was always a strong reader and loved it, once I started.
tallanvor is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2012, 05:12 AM   #17
psylion's Avatar
psylion
Registered Users
seller
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 1,565
My SIL is a children's librarian and she would rant for ages about people not considering picture books "real books" she's even an advocate of books with only pictures. My DD will be 5 in August and I don't think I've ever read her anything with no pictures in it at all. I was pretty proud when she sat through the whole hobbit a few months ago though. It is way over 100 pages. She loved it so much should ask to be read it over watching TV (and she is crazy obsessed with TV). I think she may be too young yet for the lord of the rings though. I might try reading her Harry Potter soon. I'm not going to stop reading her beautiful picture books though. Lately, we've been going back to her little baby board books because now she can read them herself.
__________________
Alanna is Mama to DD Sequoia (8/8/07), DS Callum (12/12/12) DKitties Syd & Emily (4/4/03)
psylion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2012, 07:15 PM   #18
cmarsh31's Avatar
cmarsh31
Registered Users
seller
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 4,364
My Mood:
Re: S/O When did you start reading "real" books to your kids?

Probably 4-ish for DS, younger for DD, but that's because she's been along for the ride a lot... more of the Frog & Toad variety at that age. We *just* started Harry Potter and most nights one of us reads separately to DD when it's a HP night, she's not interested. DS is very, very sensitive though - he loves Captain Underpants (I do NOT) but struggles with anything sad. He read Charlie & the Chocolate Factory but needed a lot of emotional support to get through the first couple chapters.

At 4, DD has just started asking for "small" books (ie not picture books) - but she's really most thrilled with Fancy Nancy, Pinkilicious, etc.
__________________
Carly, momma to Matthew (5/2/05) and Jillian Grace (4/30/08) My Knitting Gallery Open for Customs
cmarsh31 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2012, 07:27 PM   #19
momofdestructobaby
Registered Users
seller
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,478
Re: S/O When did you start reading "real" books to your kids?

Quote:
Originally Posted by danner View Post
I consider picture books to be real. If it has a plot, some tension, something happening, that is enough for me. I started reading those books to my daughter at 15 months (Beatrix Potter books, for example). Bear in mind though, that my daughter is probably off the charts advanced in matters of vocabulary and other reading-related activities. My son is 10 months and I'm still waiting for him to say Mama and mean it, whereas my daughter's first words (multiple) came at about 9 months.

I would urge anyone wanting to move their kid along prematurely to chapter books and away from picture books that you don't need to do that in order to get your kid to the next level. There are plenty of picture books out there with a plot and "big" words. I read an article somewhere that picture books are actually very good for preschoolers. Wish I could remember the source.

Anyway, I wish I could see into my crystal ball for my son. He doesn't have any patience for books yet. We have hundreds of board books due to our daughter's keen interest and he just takes them from me and either eats them or throws them. My daughter always sat there and turned the pages. Kids are all so different.

Great post.

I agree 100%.

I am a teacher and I read picture books to my 3rd grades. There are many many picture books with excellent plots, gorgeous pictures and which lend themselves to higher level thinking questions and great spin off discussion of life event, character traits etc.

Check out picture books by authors such as Eve Bunting, Cynthia Rylant, and Patricia Polacco. These books are "real" rich literature. Captain Underpants, is NOT.

For me reading is about engaging with the text, creating mental images, asking questions, making connections, drawing inferences, and having great discussion as a result. I personally feel that some great accompanying pictures can enhance the story....its not all about words when reading, there is so much more.

Last edited by momofdestructobaby; 06-02-2012 at 07:30 PM.
momofdestructobaby is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Copyright 2005 - 2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.