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Old 02-14-2013, 09:34 PM   #21
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We say "dude" at least once per conversation. And it means so many different things depending on the tone used.

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Old 02-14-2013, 09:49 PM   #22
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Well when we were in the south anything carbonated is "coke". Here in Idaho it is soda. I still call them all cokes. When we go out to eat I will ask my kids what kind of coke they want. Lol!

And before the coke police get all over me, I dont buy cokes for the house. My kids dont have them regularly. But when we go out I allow them to get one as a treat. They can get one plus one refill then it is water.

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Old 02-14-2013, 11:00 PM   #23
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Re: Things people say where you live.....

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Ha, drivers are *awful* but I cannot go for a bus ride or a train ride without someone making conversation, wondering how my day is going, do I know where I'm going (once they've heard my accent). People smile and say hello in the street, and everyone stops and talks to my little girl. The bus drivers wait for you, and if you can see a bus you'll need to make a connecting journey on, they will stop traffic, hooting the whole time, while they try and catch the other driver's attention.

We don't do that in London. The only interaction with strangers on public transport there is sexual harassment.

When I first moved here, I asked a server in a restaurant where the toilet was, and he was absolutely disgusted with me. When my husband first moved to England, he asked a waiter where the restroom was, and the poor kid stammered that they didn't have a lounge.
It must be the accent! But London sounds nice too nothing says welcome like sexual harassment.
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Old 02-14-2013, 11:04 PM   #24
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Re: Things people say where you live.....

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We say "dude" at least once per conversation. And it means so many different things depending on the tone used.
Dh says this all the time and you are right he uses different tones. I never thought about it until now. But I had to put stop to him calling me dude. Sorry my name will never be dude.
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Old 02-14-2013, 11:10 PM   #25
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Re: Things people say where you live.....

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Where I'm originally from, the NYC suburbs, we stand ON line, not in line.

Here in Buffalo, where nobody is quite sure if we are Midwest or Northeast (I say Great Lakes) it's very much about food and weather. The number of bars here is neck and neck with the number of churches, which might tell you something about how "devout" it is here.

Also, the friendliness here is downright frightening. When I moved here from Long Island and went clothes shopping, I was actually confused and annoyed when a store clerk asked me if I needed help. I was like ... did I ask you for help? Ha, amazing now 15+ years later how different the cultures are.

There is still a bit of snow on the ground, but any day now I'll be wearing my birks and young guys will be wearing their cargo shorts and Buff State hoodie pullovers.
I had that happen with sales people too. Back in IL you have to find someone and drag them kicking and screaming. But over here I told dh why won't they leave us alone? He said because it is their job to help us.
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Old 02-14-2013, 11:29 PM   #26
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We say "dude" at least once per conversation. And it means so many different things depending on the tone used.
Haha. Yup. We can have a complete conversation with one word. DH always gets on me when I am around my BFF or sister because "dude" gets used constantly. Maybe that is part of being a teen in the '90s.

We have pop here, use unnecessary prepositions & warsh instead of wash. I always got made fun of by my BFF's mom for the way I pronounced things. I'm from NE Ohio, a suburb of Akron and they are from Toledo. Not that far but far enough.


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Old 02-15-2013, 12:00 AM   #27
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Re: Things people say where you live.....

When we moved to NC the first time I was always weirded out by how familiar people were in conversation. I worked in a restaurant and it used to creep me out when customers would call me darling or hon. Seriously, you don't know my name, don't call me endearments! But you get used to it.
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Old 02-15-2013, 12:45 AM   #28
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Re: Things people say where you live.....

I live in the city and a lot of people are from outer areas, so I haven't really picked up any local slang other than saying gonna, didja, etc. I get patients from some of the rural areas and a lot of them have a pretty heavy drawl and some interesting ways of saying things. Can't think of anything now, though, lol! Sometimes I even fall into their accent because it's kind of fun, haha.

I have heard 'I'm gonna beat your ***!' on a few occasions, though. It really bugs me.
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Old 02-15-2013, 01:11 AM   #29
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Re: Things people say where you live.....

Native Texan here and I keep all the yankee transplants at the O&G company I work at rolling with laughter. All these have rolled out of my mouth at one time or another:

Here in Texas we are not "about to", or "going to", we are always "Fixin'" to do something.
This is like trying to side saddle an oyster. (impossible task)
Useless as tits on a boar hog.
So ugly they had to tie a bone around his/her neck to get the dog to play with him/her.
The Ugly Fairy beat the ever-loving sh*t out of him/her with her wand.
Your alligator mouth is about to overload your hummingbird @ss
Cuter than a yard full of puppies
Nervous as a long-tailed cat on a porch full of rocking chairs
Confused as a baby in a topless bar
You make a bed like old people f*ck, slow and sloppy.
I haven't had this much fun since the hog ate my baby brother
This is more fun than stompin baby chickens
It's so dry the trees are bribin' the dogs
He's/She's not runnin' on all eight cylinders, if ya know what I mean?
He/She's two sandwiches short of a picnic
Hotter than Hades
She'd/He'd charge Hell with a bucket of ice water.
I ate so many armadillos growing up, I still roll up in a ball, every time I hear a dog bark (something you'd say when talking about growing up poor)
Come Hell or High Water
As serious as cancer
As serious as the business end of a .45
Livin high on the hog
Fair to Middlin' (mid grades of cotton, when asked how we are doing, this is the same as saying "not so bad")
I wouldn't trust him/her as far as I could throw him/her
I wouldn't p*ss on him/her if he/she were on fire (speaking of someone you really hate)
Colder than a witches tit in December
Don't hang your wash on someone else's line
You ain't learnin nothin, if your jaws are a flappin
Always drink upstream from the herd
Lord willing and the creek don't rise
You're gonna end up being late to your own funeral (something you say to someone who is moving too slow)
I'll beat you till you bleed (similar to I'll beat your butt)
Your butt and my hand are about to have a date (threatening a spanking)
Do it again, and I'll knock you silly (or into next week)
Baptists never greet each other in a liquor store
There's more than one way to skin a cat
It don't take a genius to spot a goat in a herd of sheep
If you think you're a person of influence, try orderin somebody else's dog around
Lettin the cat outta the bag is a whole lot easier than puttin it back in
When a buzzard sits on a fence starin at you, it's time to go to the doctor
The quickest way to double your money is to fold it over and put it back in your wallet
A smart @ss just don't fit in the saddle
Don't worry about bitin off more than you can chew, your mouth is a whole lot bigger than you think
If you are riding ahead of the herd, take a look back every now and then to make sure it's still there.
Good judgement comes from experience and alot of that comes from bad judgement.
If you find yourself in a hole, stop diggin'
When dealin with a slick SOB, start by pinnin him down and changin his oil
If you give a lesson in meanness to a person, don't be surprised if they learn their lesson.
Never kick a fresh turd on a hot day.
Never miss a good opportunity to shut up
Couldn't pour water out of a boot if you wrote the instructions on the heel.
Gully Washer (when speaking of heavy rain)
Happy as a pig in slop
Riding a gravy train with biscuit wheels (when speaking of luck)
Happy as a two peckered dog
Warm in winter, shady in summer (speaking of someone who is fat)
Don't know whether to scratch my watch or wind my @ss (confused/overwhelmed)
A day late and a dollar short
Catch ya on the back side (see you later)

My Hubby's from Michigan, and his relatives can't end a sentence without saying "you know?" I always say "Well no, I don't know?" just to get a rise out of them. I think that kills me more than my colorful Texas speech cracks them up, half the time I have to explain the meaning of the phrases I use, as I always get plenty of confused looks with some of them, then delayed laughter.

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Old 02-15-2013, 01:15 AM   #30
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Re: Things people say where you live.....

Here, if there is a "t" in the middle of a word, it gets swallowed. "Mountain" is "moun-un", "centerville" (a slc suburb) is "sinnrville". Never fear, the "t" is not lost - it's just smashed on the back of another random word, like "acrosst", as in "go acrosst the moun-un and get your dad"

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