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Old 10-09-2007, 11:54 PM   #11
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Re: Aspberger Syndrome....

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I posted multiple times on another thread...I'll see if I can dig it up. In a nutshell, my AS kid has a lack of social graces (other than what I have taught him), he cannot read social situations, and he does not understand social norms (again, other than what I have taught him). He also has sensory overstimulation problems to contend with.

The most important thing I've done with my son is to tell him that the way he sees the world is NORMAL, to him it is NORMAL, and educate him as to what others think. If he is in a situation that he is not reading the "normal" way, I help him describe what he thinks, then I fill in the blank as to what the other person was thinking (or expecting), and I walk him through how to meet in the middle. AS kids lack instictive understanding of group dynamics, and they do not pick it up when in the group. This is why my son was undiagnosed for many years; the teachers knew something was going on, but they labeled him as willfully disobedient/problem child rather than putting the pieces together.

Anyway, AS kids need social education as well as sensory integration therapy. I had to abandon the "therapists" and the "professionals" and do this for my son. He has progressed more in the last year under my family's direction than he had with all the other therapists or in school.
Thanks you for sharing...

Sounds familiar. Always wondering why DS wouldn't just cooperate and go along with the group - he's horrible in group settings because he just doesnt seem to get it. We actaully say that a lot about him - he doesn't seem to get it... but talk to him about building something or things along the line of engineering or pokemon and oh man you'll get an ear ful for hours!!!

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Old 10-10-2007, 03:39 AM   #12
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Re: Aspberger Syndrome....

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Thanks you for sharing...

Sounds familiar. Always wondering why DS wouldn't just cooperate and go along with the group - he's horrible in group settings because he just doesnt seem to get it. We actaully say that a lot about him - he doesn't seem to get it... but talk to him about building something or things along the line of engineering or pokemon and oh man you'll get an ear ful for hours!!!
With my son it is Yu-Gi-Oh. They told me had ADD; I countered with HOW??? He can do Yu-Gi-Oh uninterrupted for five hours, but he has ADD? I don't think so. They dismissed his sensory issues as "oh, that sometimes happens with ADD".

He is in soccer and baseball. He has done SO well with these two! The soccer region is AYSO (www.soccer.org), and we happen to have a phenomenal local region. You can always pick him out of the crowd because his running does not look like the others. He has issues with his body dynamics and exercise tolerance.

One of the things they were working on in OT was exercise tolerance. Problem: They put him on an elliptical machine and told him he HAD TO DO 3 minutes. If he slowed down too much, they would reset the three minutes. Dummies. Of course it did not work. I handed him a HOOLAHOOP. He got more out of that (exercise plus gaining awareness of his body in relationship to an object) than he ever did on a machine. And he was having fun. Same with soccer. He is starting his second year, and the changes are amazing! Before he would only run to the ball for a short distance, now he does it without thinking, and he runs longer distances.

Group dynamics are how my son SHOULD HAVE been diagnosed. Since the second grade, I kept telling the teachers "he thinks this way...talk to him like this", and they didn't get it. They would tell me all the problems he was having in the classroom and I would tell them 1) I needed more information to help them, and 2) I wasn't seeing the same behaviors at home. What I now know is this is because AS manifests in the GROUP dynamic, and we had a more INDIVIDUAL dynamic at home, so I wasn't seeing the manifestations. The schools were missing it, clearly.

He recently decided that he wants to go back to school. I had HIM interview the schools and ask them the questions that were important to him. He may be starting this month. Little nervous, but we'll see what happens...
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Old 10-10-2007, 07:01 AM   #13
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Re: Aspberger Syndrome....

I am sorry mama, that you havn't been able to find people at school who are understanding of DS and can relate to him on his level.Hopefully you will find a better fit for him.
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Old 10-10-2007, 10:08 AM   #14
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Re: Aspberger Syndrome....

Yep - school, while he does well academically, his behaviour has always been labeld as defiant. but his defiance has never been "bad" per se. He doesn't want to line up behind certain people because he's taller than they are and he gets a referral. He said it didn't feel right to be infront of someone that was shorter than he was. My DS is now in 6th grade and somehow made it through okay. (and I atrribute his success to me and me alone since everyone else wrote him off as a behaviour problem long ago)

A few years back they tried pushing ADD on him too.. yeah right, he can sit and read for 4 hours and focus on doing plane models, but he's ADD -whatever.
Thanks ladies...

Bean - hope he finds a school worthy of his presence
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Old 10-10-2007, 10:34 AM   #15
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Re: Aspberger Syndrome....

I thought Asbergers with my oldest, but after extensive testing, what we've come up with is OCD and Sensory Integration Dysfunction. He plays well with his peers when he is comfortable so that ruled out AS.

Anyway, trust your gut and have your ds evaluated. We've made so much progress in just 3 short months working with a behavioral psychologist and OT.

Brenda
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Old 10-11-2007, 12:55 AM   #16
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Re: Aspberger Syndrome....

hmm. So what actually will constitute 'playing well' ? I've considered OCD but its doesnt explain some of the 'stuff'... kwim?
Oh - and where can I look to get an eval. I am pretty sure his ped will blow it off.
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Old 10-11-2007, 05:55 AM   #17
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Re: Aspberger Syndrome....

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hmm. So what actually will constitute 'playing well' ? I've considered OCD but its doesnt explain some of the 'stuff'... kwim?
Oh - and where can I look to get an eval. I am pretty sure his ped will blow it off.
The Department of Health for your state should have a Developmental Pediatrician in their "Child Development Clinic" to do an eval for you. I'm not sure if you need to be referred to them by your pediatrician or not. I would call them directly to see. If you need a referral, I would ask your ped for one. If your ped won't do it I would take your kiddo to a different ped who will.
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Old 10-11-2007, 06:19 AM   #18
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Re: Aspberger Syndrome....

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hmm. So what actually will constitute 'playing well' ? I've considered OCD but its doesnt explain some of the 'stuff'... kwim?
Oh - and where can I look to get an eval. I am pretty sure his ped will blow it off.
"Playing well" with others is a hard one. AS kids "mimic" things without the understanding of "why" they are mimicking. For example, in the 6th grade, a very observant staff member (bless her for finally telling me this!) said that at lunch he sat with the other kids but he didn't "interact" with them. He had "friends', but he NEVER knew their names. On the surface, to a casual eye, he was "playing well", but he wasn't ENGAGING. KWIM?

As for getting a referral...oh brother. I went to the pediatrician the day after the jack*** psychiatrist told me he was ADHD (after seeing him for 40 minutes and with NO testing at all!). I trust her, and we hashed out a new plan. I ended up getting in to see a psychologist who DID do extensive testing. Even so, I always knew more than the "professionals", which was more than a little bothersome.

Asperger's is commonly misdiagnosed as ADHD, oppositional/defiant disorder, and bipolar disorder. We might as well get used to that now...if they diagnose these things, they are missing the bigger picture.

Remember also that other syndromes can COEXIST with AS. I was a nanny for a boy with AS, and he did have a component of ADHD, though that diagnosis in itself would not explain things.

Your son is very perceptive in understanding WHY he doesn't want to stand in line. Honestly, my son doesn't see the usefulness in "standing in line". He figures that if he is still cooperative, does he need to stand in a "line"? They will be seen as nonconformists because their viewpoints and perceptions are outside of the "normal".

Encourage your son to communicate with you about WHY he does the things he does. It is perfectly FINE that he feels these things, as this is his "normal". I finally told the school one day that it is not WHAT happened that I am concerned with, it is my son's PERCEPTION of what happened that I am concerned with. If HE felt overwhelmed, then he was overwhelmed. It doesn't matter what the adults thought the situation was. KWIM? I hope that made sense.

Please PM me anytime you want...I will also follow this discussion. I think it is valuable for us to communicate about these things to help our kiddos!
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