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Old 06-15-2008, 06:27 AM   #1
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Stinky Frozen BM?!

My BM even right after I pump smells funny, then when I freeze it it smells even worse. Almost metallic smelling and sour? What gives?

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Old 06-15-2008, 06:56 AM   #2
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Re: Stinky Frozen BM?!

I don't remember my fresh expressed BM smelling off, but I do remember the frozen stuff sometimes having a metallic smell. I'm not sure why it happens, I think I blamed the freezer. I think the longer it is frozen the stronger the smell was too. As for the fresh BM, there really isn't anything to compare the smell to, as most milk is pasteurized and homogenized. I wouldn't worry as long as your baby still eats it.
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Old 06-15-2008, 07:25 AM   #3
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Re: Stinky Frozen BM?!

Mine did that with DS though oddly enough not this time. Its excess liapese. Lemme get the kellymom link..

Lipase is an enzyme that is normally present in human milk and has several known beneficial functions:

Lipases help keep milk fat well-mixed (emulsified) with the "whey" portion of the milk, and also keep the fat globules small so that they are easily digestible (Lawrence & Lawrence, p. 156).
Lipases also help to break down fats in the milk, so that fat soluble nutrients (vitamins A & D, for example) and free fatty acids (which help to protect baby from illness) are easily available to baby (Lawrence & Lawrence, p. 156).
The primary lipase in human milk, bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL), "has been found to be the major factor inactivating protozoans" (Lawrence & Lawrence, p. 203).
Per Lawrence & Lawrence (p. 158), the amount of BSSL in a particular mother's milk does not vary during a feed, and is not different at different times of day or different stages of lactation. There is evidence that there may be a decrease in lipase activity over time in mothers who are malnourished.

What can I do if my storage problem is due to excess lipase? Once the milk becomes sour or rancid smelling/tasting, there is no known way to salvage it. However, newly expressed milk can be stored by heating the milk to a scald to inactivate the lipase and stop the process of fat digestion. Scald the milk as soon after expression as possible.

To scald milk:

Heat milk to about 180 F (82 C), or until you see little bubbles around the edge of the pan (not to a full, rolling boil).
Quickly cool and store the milk.
Scalding the milk will destroy some of the antiinfective properties of the milk and may lower some nutrient levels, but this is not likely to be an issue unless all of the milk that baby is receiving has been heat-treated.

http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/lipase-expressedmilk.html
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