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Old 08-31-2011, 10:17 PM   #11
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I have an 8 year old who soaked a pull up every night. It was also genetic as his dad wet until 8 or 12 depending on who you ask! Our doctor said by his age he was not going to probably outgrow it quickly on his own, after 7 only 10% outgrow it each year. He said when we were ready the best success was the alarm. I fought it because I was tired, it wasn't cheap... But with a new baby coming I decided we had to try this summer...and it was awesome! First 1-2 weeks I literally had to pull him out of bed as it vibrated and alarmed as he started to pee, get him to the toilet, change sheets (we put him on an air mattress for learning) make him change his clothes... The whole thing, but after a couple weeks he learned to wake himself up, turn off the alarm, and usually just change his underwear. Within about 1 month his alarm never went off again. It has been about 2+ months and he doesn't even sleep with the alarm anymore! I really would try it before meds!

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Old 08-31-2011, 10:47 PM   #12
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I didn't even know there was meds for it. Dd is five and she wets very often. I have to wash a ton of laundry though.

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Old 08-31-2011, 11:17 PM   #13
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Re: Anyone resorted to medication to "cure" older child of bedwetting?

I'd look into diet before medication, personally. I'm big on EC and this comes up all the time on some EC boards and food sensitivities can cause this. From what I understand, dairy & gluten can be big culprits. Although what christenjoy said may help too!
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Old 09-01-2011, 11:11 PM   #14
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Re: Anyone resorted to medication to "cure" older child of bedwetting?

It's interesting that you mentioned the diet because all of my kids (well, with the exception of my oldest which the post is really about), have been very sensitive to foods in my breastmilk. I think that my oldest was sensitive too, though, because he was an extremely fussy nurser, but didn't get the major symptoms that my other 4 babies have all gotten. I nurse each child for several years, and after the first year or so, they seem to outgrow the sensitivities and I can eat a normal diet. But, especially for the first 6 months or so, I cannot have any wheat, dairy, or corn ingredients at all because if I do, they will be fussy, poop mucus, have a terrible diaper rash, be congested, etc.

I've always wondered if they really do completely outgrow the sensitivity or if it just improves but their bodies still have that weakness. So it makes total sense that the bedwetting would be related. Hmmmm. ... definitely something I will need to think about. My oldest is my pickiest eater and it would be so difficult to completely change his diet, but I'm wondering if I start lessening his consumption of dairy and wheat if perhaps I'd start to see some improvement.
Thanks for the idea! Perhaps combined with the alarm, it could be really beneficial.

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Old 09-02-2011, 10:00 AM   #15
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I wet until I was 13 (I think?) and had all kinds of tests done. It runs in my family and I can sympathize with your son. I would always stress soooo much about sleep overs and camp. I would be sure to be first up and last to bed so nobody could see or hear the goodnights I had to wear. The docs tried a nasal spray for me which didn't work. I never tried the alarm though, I'll give it a go if I've passed this trait onto dd. I'm not sure if i'd want to give dd medication but thinking back to how stressful it was would make it a tough decision for me. Just be supportive and try to help him not get depressed about it. He'll grow out of it eventually. Good luck!
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Old 09-02-2011, 12:11 PM   #16
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Re: Anyone resorted to medication to "cure" older child of bedwetting?

Seriously, I was so skeptical of the alarm actually working for us. I decided we had to commit to it 100% to give it a fair shot, but would not use it more than 2 months if I wasn't seeing significant improvement in those 2 months of 100% commitment. It has really boosted his self-esteem so much! Try the alarm! My 3 1/2 year old who is a carbon copy of his dad and brother already wants to use the alarm, I just don't think he's ready yet!
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Old 09-02-2011, 02:20 PM   #17
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Re: Anyone resorted to medication to "cure" older child of bedwetting?

I looked into it. My 6yo son wets every night, so much that more often than not he wets right through the goodnight/underjam and wets his sheets and everything as well. I have spoken to the doc about it several times, including this year as my son was invited on his first overnight and I declined because of the wetting issue. My doc told me about DDAVP and one other type of med and explained that it reduced urine output b/c it made the kidneys retain extra fluid. I wasn't comfortable with the explanation of how the medicines worked, so I declined the referral (our ped said she would refer us to a pediatric urologist who would do a workup and prescribe the meds.)

If I were you, I'd start by talking to the doc and researching the exact meds that would be prescribed. If you are comfortable with giving them to your child, then I would try them out.
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Old 09-02-2011, 09:09 PM   #18
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Re: Anyone resorted to medication to "cure" older child of bedwetting?

That's pretty scary to me how those meds work. Thanks for the info. I just don't want anything like that in my child that's going to affect how his kidneys function. I can see using it for specific events, like being able to go to camp like a previous poster mentioned, but now I know I wouldn't be comfortable having it as a long term solution. (My mom keeps making comments about looking into medication, so now I can tell her too about how it works and I doubt she'd be all that comfortable with it.)
Laina83, thanks for the personal perspective--it's reassuring to know that you eventually outgrew it without needing any sort of medical intervention.
I think I'm going to start figuring out which alarm to try! I mentioned it to ds tonight and his basic comment was "It won't work. It'll already be too late by the time it goes off." Then he said, "Aren't they really expensive?" But then he laughed and said, "But it would get used a lot! I bet all of us kids would end up needing it!" Yeah, misery loves company. I think it helps that all of the kids have trouble staying dry at night. It would be more embarrassing for him if the 4, 6, and 8 year old could all stay dry.
Anyways, I talked to him about how eventually it would train his body to wake up before he starts going and he seemed open to it. Sounds like that will be the next step.
If anyone has a specific brand/model that they used and were pleased with, please let me know. Thanks!
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Old 09-03-2011, 02:00 AM   #19
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Re: Anyone resorted to medication to "cure" older child of bedwetting?

I'm taking care of a 12 year old right now foster kid that has enuresis (for 2 weeks respite). They aren't doing anything for it right now since they're more focused on getting him stable in his foster home. It can be difficult to deal with someone so old who has to put on pull ups before bed... dealing with showers, putting pull ups away, washing sheets, mattress protectors... there's a lot to it! Then the emotional aspect of supporting him and not making it a big deal.

Several years ago I was a camp counselor for "outdoor school" where 6th graders came for a week. Sleeping bags in cabins. In a school of 100 or so there were still a handful that had accidents at night (which really surprised me). It wasn't advertised or discussed to parents, but some kids showed up and were still wetting the bed. They obviously didn't talk about it. The guy training us was very somber and explained how kids shouldn't have to deal with the embarrassment. So before we took our kiddos out to the morning assembly we had to feel under each sleeping bag to see if any were wet. Wet ones got a clothes pin put on them. Then during breakfast counselors put a note in the "BZ" (broken zippers was the code) can. While the guy in charge would play with the can and throw it up high to get our attention until every counselor remembered to put their paper in to report any BZs. That way every single sleeping bag was checked every day. While kids were out doing activities their sleeping bags were washed and returned discretely before the kids came back.

I know it doesn't feel great now, especially with peers, but there are camps that will accommodate enuresis discretely.

I've been a nanny for a long time and I remember one year doing new year's with 8 kids and one other nanny. We were both told about the 8ish year old that had pull ups for his accidents. The other nanny absolutely shocked me when she took out the pull ups and flashed them around in front of the other kids and reminded him all about how he needed to wear it so he wouldn't have any accidents. The kid looked so embarrassed and I don't remember his response but she said several times in front of the other kids about how "it's nothing to be embarrassed about." I was horrified for that little boy. There are people out there that think they are being helpful and supportive but really aren't!

In your situation I would try to rule out all other things before going with meds. There's always side effects and I don't like things "messing" with your body. I'm sure you're well aware of all the easy things to try... limit liquids, MAKE them go before bed etc. Patience is helpful since often kids just grow out of it. But it sucks that he's starting to be socially limited by it. If he's motivated, then an alarm may very well work for him, just takes time. It's unusual to have all your kids affected, makes me wonder if there's a physical/genetic component. Good luck!
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Old 09-03-2011, 12:22 PM   #20
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Re: Anyone resorted to medication to "cure" older child of bedwetting?

Oh my goodness, I just loved your description of the whole way that the camp dealt with the wet sleeping bags. Sounds like they totally went out of their way to make sure kids weren't embarrassed and that they had a clean, dry bed every night. Pretty impressive!
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