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Old 11-20-2007, 03:06 PM   #11
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Re: ARR What to Expect-- need to vent- what are her credentials

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Originally Posted by uoducks View Post
exactly, some doctors are good, some are bad just like with anything.

You are showing NO evidence that these doctors who wrote this book are lying, or bad.

I don't have that built in reflex you talk about for co-sleeping. The risks far outweigh the rewards especially if the risk is suffocation, smothering,,etc.

I am speaking with first hand knowledge of this book. Since no-one here so far seems to actually have read this book....until you have..

see ya!
All your posts seem like your looking for a fight!?

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Originally Posted by mommy2kaitlyn View Post
Co-sleeping is very dangerous. Not saying under the right conditions it can't be done with less danger but it is.
I have experienced what the pp mentioned..close call myself. I stopped because of this. Sorry waking up with your baby screaming and fighting because you are on her arm and close to on her body makes you stop. And no I was not drugged, drunk, etc. I was a typical new tired mommy.
Not to mention a distant family member that killed(her words not mine or police) her baby co-sleeping..she rolled on top of said child is all they can figure. It was not SIDS. She woke up to him dead next to her. She was not drunk or drugged either. And this baby was slightly older! The baby's death was labeled as accidental due to co-sleeping.
Co-Sleeping can be unsafe if the proper measures are not taken.

Crib sleeping is very dangerous also. ALL sleeping arangements can be dangerous if not done properly.

My Uncle (dies before I was born) died of SIDS at 5months old, sleeping in a crib.

--------

CO-SLEEPING RESEARCH
The physiological effects of sleep-sharing are finally being studied in sleep laboratories that are set up to mimic, as much as possible, the home bedroom. Over the past few years, nearly a million dollars of government research money has been devoted to sleep-sharing research. These studies have all been done on mothers and infants ranging from two to five months in age. Here are the preliminary findings based on mother-infant pairs studied in the sleep-sharing arrangement versus the solitary-sleeping arrangement (Elias 1986, McKenna 1993, Fleming 1994; Mosko 1994):

1. Sleep-sharing pairs showed more synchronous arousals than when sleeping separately. When one member of the pair stirred, coughed, or changed sleeping stages, the other member also changed, often without awakening.

2. Each member of the pair tended to often, but not always, be in the same stage of sleep for longer periods if they slept together.

3. Sleep-sharing babies spent less time in each cycle of deep sleep. Lest mothers worry they will get less deep sleep; preliminary studies showed that sleep-sharing mothers didn't get less total deep sleep.

4. Sleep-sharing infants aroused more often and spent more time breastfeeding than solitary sleepers, yet the sleep-sharing mothers did not report awakening more frequently.

5. Sleep-sharing infants tended to sleep more often on their backs or sides and less often on their tummies, a factor that could itself lower the SIDS risk.

6. A lot of mutual touch and interaction occurs between the sleep-sharers. What one does affects the nighttime behavior of the other.

Even though these studies are being conducted in sleep laboratories instead of the natural home environment, it's likely that within a few years enough mother-infant pairs will be studied to scientifically validate what insightful mothers have long known: something good and healthful occurs when mothers and babies share sleep.

7 BENEFITS OF CO-SLEEPING: MEDICAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL
There is no right or wrong place for baby to sleep. Wherever all family members sleep the best is the right arrangement for you. Remember, over half the world's population sleeps with their baby, and more and more parents in the U.S. are sharing sleep with their little one. Here's why:

1. Babies sleep better
Sleepsharing babies usually go to sleep and stay asleep better. Being parented to sleep at the breast of mother or in the arms of father creates a healthy go-to-sleep attitude. Baby learns that going to sleep is a pleasant state to enter (one of our goals of nighttime parenting).
Babies stay asleep better. Put yourself in the sleep pattern of baby. As baby passes from deep sleep into light sleep, he enters a vulnerable period for nightwaking, a transition state that may occur as often as every hour and from which it is difficult for baby to resettle on his own into a deep sleep. You are a familiar attachment person whom baby can touch, smell, and hear. Your presence conveys an "It's OK to go back to sleep" message. Feeling no worry, baby peacefully drifts through this vulnerable period of nightwaking and reenters deep sleep. If baby does awaken, she is sometimes able to resettle herself because you are right there. A familiar touch, perhaps a few minutes' feed, and you comfort baby back into deep sleep without either member of the sleep-sharing pair fully awakening.

Many babies need help going back to sleep because of a developmental quirk called object or person permanence. When something or someone is out of sight, it is out of mind. Most babies less than a year old do not have the ability to think of mother as existing somewhere else. When babies awaken alone in a crib, they become frightened and often unable to resettle back into deep sleep. Because of this separation anxiety, they learn that sleep is a fearful state to remain in (not one of our goals of nighttime parenting).

2. Mothers sleep better
Many mothers and infants are able to achieve nighttime harmony: babies and mothers get their sleep cycles in sync with one another.
Martha notes: "I would automatically awaken seconds before my baby would. When the baby started to squirm, I would lay on a comforting hand and she would drift back to sleep. Sometimes I did this automatically and I didn't even wake up."
Contrast sleepsharing with the crib and nursery scene. The separate sleeper awakens – alone and behind bars. He is out of touch. He first squirms and whimpers. Still out of touch. Separation anxiety sets in, baby becomes scared, and the cry escalates into an all-out wail or plea for help. This piercing cry awakens even the most long distance mother, who jumps up (sometimes out of the state of deep sleep, which is what leads to most nighttime exhaustion), and staggers reluctantly down the hall. By the time mother reaches the baby, baby is wide awake and upset, mother is wide awake and upset, and the comforting that follows becomes a reluctant duty rather than an automatic nurturant response. It takes longer to resettle an upset solo sleeper than it does a half-asleep baby who is sleeping within arm's reach of mother. Once baby does fall asleep, mother is still wide-awake and too upset to resettle easily. If, however, the baby is sleeping next to mother and they have their sleep cycles in sync, most mothers and babies can quickly resettle without either member of the sleepsharing pair fully awakening. Being awakened suddenly and completely from a state of deep sleep to attend to a hungry or frightened baby is what leads to sleep-deprived parents and fearful babies.

3. Breastfeeding is easier
Most veteran breastfeeding mothers have, for survival, learned that sharing sleep makes breastfeeding easier. Breastfeeding mothers find it easier than bottlefeeding mothers to get their sleep cycles in sync with their babies. They often wake up just before the babies awaken for a feeding. By being there and anticipating the feeding, mother can breastfeed baby back to a deep sleep before baby (and often mother) fully awakens.
A mother who had achieved nighttime-nursing harmony with her baby shared the following story with us:
"About thirty seconds before my baby wakes up for a feeding, my sleep seems to lighten and I almost wake up. By being able to anticipate his feeding, I usually can start breastfeeding him just as he begins to squirm and reach for the nipple. Getting him to suck immediately keeps him from fully waking up, and then we both drift back into a deep sleep right after feeding."

Mothers who experience daytime breastfeeding difficulties report that breastfeeding becomes easier when they sleep next to their babies at night and lie down with baby and nap nurse during the day. We believe baby senses that mother is more relaxed, and her milk-producing hormones work better when she is relaxed or sleeping.

4. It's contemporary parenting
Sleepsharing is even more relevant in today's busy lifestyles. As more and more mothers, out of necessity, are separated from their baby during the day, sleeping with their baby at night allows them to reconnect and make up for missed touch time during the day. As a nighttime perk, the relaxing hormones that are produced in response to baby nursing relax a mother and help her wind down from the tension of a busy day's work. (See
5. Babies thrive better
Over the past thirty years of observing sleepsharing families in our pediatric practice, we have noticed one medical benefit that stands out; these babies thrive . "Thriving" means not only getting bigger, but also growing to your full potential, emotionally, physically, and intellectually. Perhaps it's the extra touch that stimulates development, or perhaps the extra feedings (yes, sleepsharing infants breastfeed more often than solo sleepers).
6. Parents and infants become more connected
Remember that becoming connected is the basis of parenting, and one of your early goals of parenting. In our office, we keep a file entitled "Kids Who Turned Out Well, What Their Parents Did." We have noticed that infants who sleep with their parents (some or all of the time during those early formative years) not only thrive better, but infants and parents are more connected.
7. Reduces the risk of SIDS
New research is showing what parents the world over have long suspected: infants who sleep safely nestled next to parents are less likely to succumb to the tragedy of SIDS. Yet, because SIDS is so rare (.5 to 1 case per 1,000 infants), this worry should not be a reason to sleep with your baby. (For in depth information on the science of sleepsharing and the experiments showing how sleep benefits a baby's nighttime physiology. (See SIDS)
Co-sleeping does not always work and some parents simply do not want to sleep with their baby. Sleepsharing is an optional attachment tool. You are not bad parents if you don't sleep with your baby. Try it. If it's working and you enjoy it, continue. If not, try other sleeping arrangements (an alternative is the sidecar arrangement: place a crib or co-sleeper adjacent to your bed).

New parents often worry that their child will get so used to sleeping with them that he may never want to leave their bed. Yes, if you're used to sleeping first-class, you are reluctant to be downgraded. Like weaning from the breast, infants do wean from your bed (usually sometime around two years of age). Keep in mind that sleepsharing may be the arrangement that is designed for the safety and security of babies. The time in your arms, at your breast, and in your bed is a very short time in the total life of your child, yet the memories of love and availability last a lifetime.

CO-SLEEPING AND SIDS
Since research suggests that infants at risk of SIDS have a diminished arousal response during sleep, it seems logical that anything that increases the infant's arousability from sleep or the mother's awareness of her infant during sleep may decrease the risk of SIDS. That's exactly what sleeping with your baby can do. Here are the vital roles a sleep-sharing mother plays:

DR. SEARS SIDS HYPOTHESIS:

I believe that in most cases SIDS is a sleep disorder, primarily a disorder of arousal and breathing control during sleep. All the elements of natural mothering, especially breastfeeding and sharing sleep, benefit the infant's breathing control and increase the mutual awareness between mother and infant so that their arousability is increased and the risk of SIDS decreased.



Mother acts as pacemaker. A major part of my sleep-sharing hypothesis is that mother can act as a breathing pacemaker for her baby. Picture what happens when mother and baby sleep side by side. Mother acts like a breathing pacemaker for her baby during sleep. Together they develop what we call "sleep harmony." Both members of the sleeping pair have simultaneous sleep stages, perhaps not perfectly attuned and not all night long, but close enough that they are mutually aware of each other's presence without disturbing each other's sleep. Because of this mutual sensitivity, as baby normally cycles from deep sleep into light sleep, the presence of the mother raises baby's arousability and awareness. As previously discussed the lack of arousability or ascending out of deep sleep may characterize infants at risk for SIDS. Countless times a mother has said to me, "I automatically awaken just before my baby starts to stir and I nurse her back to sleep. Usually neither of us fully awakens, and we both quickly drift back to sleep."

Mother fills in a missing ingredient. In the early months, much of a baby's night is spent in active sleep— the state in which babies are most easily aroused. As we discussed previously, this state may "protect" the infant against stop-breathing episodes. From one to six months, the time of primary concern about SIDS, the percentage of active sleep decreases, and quiet, or deeper, sleep increases. More deep sleep means that babies start to sleep through the night. That's the good news. The concern, however, is that as baby learns to sleep deeper, it is more difficult for him to arouse when there is an apnea episode, and the risk of SIDS increases. By six months, the baby's cardiopulmonary regulating system has matured enough that the breathing centers in the brain are better able to restart breathing, even in deep sleep. But there is a vulnerable period between one and six months when the sleep is deepening, yet the compensatory mechanisms are not yet mature. During the time baby is at risk, mother fills in. In fact, mother sleeps like a baby until the baby is mature enough to sleep like an adult. That warm body next to baby acts as a breathing pacemaker, sort of reminding baby to breathe, until the baby's self-start mechanisms can handle the job on their own.

DOS:

Take precautions to prevent baby from rolling out of bed, even though it is unlikely when baby is sleeping next to mother. Like heat-seeking missiles, babies automatically gravitate toward a warm body. Yet, to be safe, place baby between mother and a guardrail or push the mattress flush against the wall and position baby between mother and the wall. Guardrails enclosed with plastic mesh are safer than those with slats, which can entrap baby's limbs or head. Be sure the guardrail is flush against the mattress so there is no crevice that baby could sink into.
Place baby adjacent to mother, rather than between mother and father. Mothers we have interviewed on the subject of sharing sleep feel they are so physically and mentally aware of their baby's presence even while sleeping, that it's extremely unlikely they would roll over onto their baby. Some fathers, on the other hand, may not enjoy the same sensitivity of baby's presence while asleep; so it is possible they might roll over on or throw out an arm onto baby. After a few months of sleep-sharing, most dads seem to develop a keen awareness of their baby's presence.
Place baby to sleep on his back.
Use a large bed, preferably a queen-size or king-size. A king-size bed may wind up being your most useful piece of "baby furniture." If you only have a cozy double bed, use the money that you would ordinarily spend on a fancy crib and other less necessary baby furniture and treat yourselves to a safe and comfortable king-size bed.
Some parents and babies sleep better if baby is still in touching and hearing distance, but not in the same bed. For them, a bedside co-sleeper is a safe option.

DON'TS:

Do not sleep with your baby if:
1. You are under the influence of any drug (such as alcohol or tranquilizing medications) that diminishes your sensitivity to your baby's presence. If you are drunk or drugged, these chemicals lessen your arousability from sleep.

2. You are extremely obese. Obesity itself may cause sleep apnea in the mother, in addition to the smothering danger.

3. You are exhausted from sleep deprivation. This lessens your awareness of your baby and your arousability from sleep.

4. You are breastfeeding a baby on a cushiony surface, such as a waterbed or couch. An exhausted mother could fall asleep breastfeeding and roll over on the baby.

5. You are the child's baby-sitter. A baby-sitter's awareness and arousability is unlikely to be as acute as a mother's.

Don't allow older siblings to sleep with a baby under nine months. Sleeping children do not have the same awareness of tiny babies as do parents, and too small or too crowded a bed space is an unsafe sleeping arrangement for a tiny baby.
Don't fall asleep with baby on a couch. Baby may get wedged between the back of the couch and the larger person's body, or baby's head may become buried in cushion crevices or soft cushions.
Do not sleep with baby on a free-floating, wavy waterbed or similar "sinky" surface in which baby could suffocate.
Don't overheat or overbundle baby. Be particularly aware of overbundling if baby is sleeping with a parent. Other warm bodies are an added heat source.
Don't wear lingerie with string ties longer than eight inches. Ditto for dangling jewelry. Baby may get caught in these entrapments.
Avoid pungent hair sprays, deodorants, and perfumes. Not only will these camouflage the natural maternal smells that baby is used to and attracted to, but foreign odors may irritate and clog baby's tiny nasal passages. Reserve these enticements for sleeping alone with your spouse.

Use common sense when sharing sleep. Anything that could cause you to sleep more soundly than usual or that alters your sleep patterns can affect your baby's safety. Nearly all the highly suspected (but seldom proven) cases of fatal "overlying" I could find in the literature could have been avoided if parents had observed common sense sleeping practices.

SLEEPING SAFELY WITH YOUR BABY
There has been a lot of media lately claiming that sleeping with your baby in an adult bed is unsafe and can result in accidental smothering of an infant. One popular research study came out in 1999 from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission that showed 515 cases of accidental infant deaths occurred in an adult bed over an 8-year period between 1990 and 1997. That's about 65 deaths per year. These deaths were not classified as Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), where the cause of death is undetermined. There were actual causes that were verified upon review of the scene and autopsy. Such causes included accidental smothering by an adult, getting trapped between the mattress and headboard or other furniture, and suffocation on a soft waterbed mattress.

The conclusion that the researchers drew from this study was that sleeping with an infant in an adult bed is dangerous and should never be done. This sounds like a reasonable conclusion, until you consider the epidemic of SIDS as a whole. During the 8-year period of this study, about 34,000 total cases of SIDS occurred in the U.S. (around 4250 per year). If 65 cases of non-SIDS accidental death occurred each year in a bed, and about 4250 cases of actual SIDS occurred overall each year, then the number of accidental deaths in an adult bed is only 1.5% of the total cases of SIDS.

There are two pieces of critical data that are missing that would allow us to determine the risk of SIDS or any cause of death in a bed versus a crib.


How many cases of actual SIDS occur in an adult bed versus in a crib?
How many babies sleep with their parents in the U.S., and how many sleep in cribs?
The data on the first question is available, but has anyone examined it? In fact, one independent researcher examined the CPSC's data and came to the opposite conclusion than did the CPSC - this data supports the conclusion that sleeping with your baby is actually SAFER than not sleeping with your baby (see Mothering Magazine Sept/Oct 2002). As for the second question, many people may think that very few babies sleep with their parents, but we shouldn't be too quick to assume this. The number of parents that bring their babies into their bed at 4 am is probably quite high. Some studies have shown that over half of parents bring their baby into bed with them at least part of the night. And the number that sleep with their infants the whole night is probably considerable as well. In fact, in most countries around the world sleeping with your baby is the norm, not the exception. And what is the incidence of SIDS in these countries? During the 1990s, in Japan the rate was only one tenth of the U.S. rate, and in Hong Kong, it was only 3% of the U.S. rate. These are just two examples. Some countries do have a higher rate of SIDS, depending on how SIDS is defined.

Until a legitimate survey is done to determine how many babies sleep with their parents, and this is factored into the rate of SIDS in a bed versus a crib, it is unwarranted to state that sleeping in a crib is safer than a bed.

If the incidence of SIDS is dramatically higher in crib versus a parent's bed, and because the cases of accidental smothering and entrapment are only 1.5% of the total SIDS cases, then sleeping with a baby in your bed would be far safer than putting baby in a crib.

The answer is not to tell parents they shouldn't sleep with their baby, but rather to educate them on how to sleep with their infants safely.

Now the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and the Juvenile Products Manufacturer's Association are launching a campaign based on research data from 1999, 2000, and 2001. During these three years, there have been 180 cases of non-SIDS accidental deaths occurring in an adult bed. Again, that's around 60 per year, similar to statistics from 1990 to 1997. How many total cases of SIDS have occurred during these 3 years? Around 2600 per year. This decline from the previous decade is thought to be due to the "back to sleep" campaign - educating parents to place their babies on their back to sleep. So looking at the past three years, the number of non-SIDS accidental deaths is only 2% of the total cases of SIDS.

A conflict of interest? Who is behind this new national campaign to warn parents not to sleep with their babies? In addition to the USCPSC, the Juvenile Products Manufacturers Association (JPMA) is co-sponsoring this campaign. The JPMA? An association of crib manufacturers. This is a huge conflict of interest. Actually, this campaign is exactly in the interest of the JPMA.

What does the research say? The September/October 2002 issue of Mothering Magazine presents research done throughout the whole world on the issue of safe sleep. Numerous studies are presented by experts of excellent reputation. And what is the magazine's conclusion based on all this research? That not only is sleeping with your baby safe, but it is actually much safer than having your baby sleep in a crib. Research shows that infants who sleep in a crib are twice as likely to suffer a sleep related fatality (including SIDS) than infants who sleep in bed with their parents.

Education on safe sleep. I do support the USCPSC's efforts to research sleep safety and to decrease the incidence of SIDS, but I feel they should go about it differently. Instead of launching a national campaign to discourage parents from sleeping with their infants, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission should educate parents on how to sleep safely with their infants if they choose to do so.

Here are some ways to educate parents on how to sleep safely with their baby:


Take precautions to prevent baby from rolling out of bed, even though it is unlikely when baby is sleeping next to mother. Like heat-seeking missiles, babies automatically gravitate toward a warm body. Yet, to be safe, place baby between mother and a guardrail or push the mattress flush against the wall and position baby between mother and the wall. Guardrails enclosed with plastic mesh are safer than those with slats, which can entrap baby's limbs or head. Be sure the guardrail is flush against the mattress so there is no crevice that baby could sink into.

Place baby adjacent to mother, rather than between mother and father. Mothers we have interviewed on the subject of sharing sleep feel they are so physically and mentally aware of their baby's presence even while sleeping, that it's extremely unlikely they would roll over onto their baby. Some fathers, on the other hand, may not enjoy the same sensitivity of baby's presence while asleep; so it is possible they might roll over on or throw out an arm onto baby. After a few months of sleep-sharing, most dads seem to develop a keen awareness of their baby's presence.

Place baby to sleep on his back.

Use a large bed, preferably a queen-size or king-size. A king-size bed may wind up being your most useful piece of "baby furniture." If you only have a cozy double bed, use the money that you would ordinarily spend on a fancy crib and other less necessary baby furniture and treat yourselves to a safe and comfortable king-size bed.

Some parents and babies sleep better if baby is still in touching and hearing distance, but not in the same bed. For them, a bedside co-sleeper is a safe option.

*JUST A LITTLE INFO from www.askdrsears.com*

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Last edited by Calideedle; 11-20-2007 at 03:08 PM.
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Old 11-20-2007, 04:52 PM   #12
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Re: ARR What to Expect-- need to vent- what are her credentials

i'm not going to get into the cosleeping thing, but the BF advice in WTEWYE sucks donkey balls. It contradicts the AAP's statement on BF several times.
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Old 11-20-2007, 06:42 PM   #13
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Re: ARR What to Expect-- need to vent- what are her credentials

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All your posts seem like your looking for a fight!?



Co-Sleeping can be unsafe if the proper measures are not taken.

Crib sleeping is very dangerous also. ALL sleeping arangements can be dangerous if not done properly.

My Uncle (dies before I was born) died of SIDS at 5months old, sleeping in a crib.
Very true that anything can be very dangerous if done in a dangerous and careless manner.

BTW I took every precaution in DD's situation and well lets just say she was in a bassinet in our room after that night for two more weeks then in her own room. I can't speak for the family member but I do know the baby was on top of the covers so it wasn't that. Well I was very tired but what new mommy isn't. And I did wake up but still it scared me. And I did not feel comfy continuing it.

Also I will say that most crib deaths are due to SIDS. Where as co-sleeping ones usually aren't because of one thing, co-sleeping the baby hears the mama breathing so it reminds the baby to breath.(as kinda stated in the article you posted) And basically SIDS is the baby forgetting to...well that is the theory atleast.

That is why the mama bears fly off the shelves..they help remind them as if mommy was there. My DD had one from day one.

I could really careless what anyone does. If they want to co-sleep fine. If they want straight to seperate rooms fine. But to say co-sleeping doesn't have added dangers to me is very wrong.
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Old 11-20-2007, 07:55 PM   #14
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Re: ARR What to Expect-- need to vent- what are her credentials

I read what to expect the first year with my oldest... he was months ahead when I was reading it so I threw it out! However, co-sleeping saved my 6 week old dd's life. She was choking and having some weird seisure at about 3 weeks old. She wasn't breathing and boy was it super scary but had she not been right in the crook of my arm, She wouldn't have been picked up and helped with the milk choking her helping her to get her breath back. She woke me up shaking her head back and forth because she couldn't breathe. I cried for the next week wondering what would have happened had I put her in her bed! she hasn't left my side since! Just as my middle son didn't leave my side after he coded at a day old in the hospital because of an allergic reaction to milk.

but the book wtetfy... just because you have a BSN (bachelors degree? I have 2! I wouldn't write a book telling people how to live and treat eachother and expect someone to believe I am an expert. and just because one or two doctors also helped write sections of the book does not mean they are experts either, how many of us went to the first pediatrician in the phone book, and trusted Everything they said? no one I know trusts their doctor explicitly, most of us also trust our own instincts and know when something is wrong or right when the doctor would not agree. thats my
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Old 11-20-2007, 09:06 PM   #15
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Re: ARR What to Expect-- need to vent- what are her credentials

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Also I will say that most crib deaths are due to SIDS. Where as co-sleeping ones usually aren't because of one thing, co-sleeping the baby hears the mama breathing so it reminds the baby to breath.(as kinda stated in the article you posted) And basically SIDS is the baby forgetting to...well that is the theory atleast.

I could really careless what anyone does. If they want to co-sleep fine. If they want straight to seperate rooms fine. But to say co-sleeping doesn't have added dangers to me is very wrong.
Co-Sleeping deaths reported include a Child sleeping alone in a big bed, A child sleeping on a couch & chair alone, A child sleeping with its parents in a bed, A child sleeping with its parents on a chair & couch - ANYTHING where a child is not sleeping in a crib.

Co-Sleeping is very safe, YES if done right. And I would love to see a study done on deaths/anything involving babies SLEEPING WITH THEIR PARENT(s) IN A BED SAFELY, period, not sleeping on a chair/couch/floor/etc! Then some true numbers can be shown!

Cribs are very dangerous too, how many kids were just killed in Simplicity Cribs because they were "made" wrong? Saying Cribs are safe is also very wrong!
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Old 11-20-2007, 11:12 PM   #16
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Re: ARR What to Expect-- need to vent- what are her credentials

I love what Dr. McKenna at the University of Notre Dame has done in researching co-sleeping:

http://www.nd.edu/~jmckenn1/lab/faq.html

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Old 11-21-2007, 12:57 AM   #17
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Re: ARR What to Expect-- need to vent- what are her credentials

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Co-Sleeping deaths reported include a Child sleeping alone in a big bed, A child sleeping on a couch & chair alone, A child sleeping with its parents in a bed, A child sleeping with its parents on a chair & couch - ANYTHING where a child is not sleeping in a crib.

Co-Sleeping is very safe, YES if done right. And I would love to see a study done on deaths/anything involving babies SLEEPING WITH THEIR PARENT(s) IN A BED SAFELY, period, not sleeping on a chair/couch/floor/etc! Then some true numbers can be shown!

Cribs are very dangerous too, how many kids were just killed in Simplicity Cribs because they were "made" wrong? Saying Cribs are safe is also very wrong!
I don't know what the studies totally studied anymore. However i believe the number one reason is suffocation why both blankets and parents rolling on to their child. One of the safety things is not be over tired..what new mom isn't? Heck what mom most nights with a baby that doesn't sleep through the night lol.

I never said cribs were safe. I said anything can be dangerous. You need to be on the ball and check for things and the simplicity issue could have been spotted by a parent that paid attention to the rules because of the gap issue. Heck carseats can be dangerous...believe me I have seen my share of misuse. I had a simplicity crib but it wasn't in the recall though I did check it again since a friend is using her for her child. I knew it was ok but had to check.

Nothing is 100% safe. I am just saying, saying co-sleeping is safe is very wrong. Even under the best of circumstances a child can die in both a crib and co-sleeping.
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Old 11-21-2007, 01:23 AM   #18
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Re: ARR What to Expect-- need to vent- what are her credentials

IMO a BA in nursing is not good enough credentials to be stating the opinions that they do in that book. Contributors generally do nothing for a book except add their name so they get credit and can boost their own curriculum vitae. In exchange it makes the book look like it is based on more facts.

I was excited about getting this book... I read it and was extremely disappointed. A lot of what they say is unfounded and based completely on opinion. I could quote some passages if it is necessary. My own credentials beat the authors and I know for a fact that there are parts of that book that are 100% opinion. It is sad that it became such a popular book. It is easy to read and gives a lot of information for one book, hence it's popularity. Not all of it is bad, but I don't trust the info that I know little about in it b/c of all the wrong information it gives about stuff I do know a lot about.
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Old 11-21-2007, 01:27 AM   #19
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Re: ARR What to Expect-- need to vent- what are her credentials

Co-sleeping is no more dangerous than leaving a newborn infant completely alone in a crib in their own room. Each have their pros and cons, each can more than likely be done safely.

There are somethings that cannot be avoided like true cases of SIDS, of course! There are many cases where, for example, a drugged mother has rollen over and suffocated their baby. It's not "co-sleeping" in that situation that is dangerous, it is the drugged mother. There are many cases of babies dying alone in their cribs of SIDS, which could possibly have been prevented if they were in their mother's arms hearing them breathe.

I co-slept on the couch, with pillows and blankets galore. And it was safe. I knew me, I knew my baby. As a teeny preemie, I was far more scared of him sleeping alone. Not that he would anyways.

But no, neither is safe OR unsafe really. It depends on the mother, child, situation, etc. Different things will work for different families. I don't think either is better 100% of the time. We personally co-sleep. He was in my arms for 4 months, and at 20 months is still in the same room, but not the same bed.

To the OP: Just tell them you are happy, the baby is happy, why is there a need to worry about anything. Babies ARE dependant. You even claim them as so on your taxes. That's life until they are 18, lol. Such a rush for babies to be independant, I'll never get it.
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We don't vaccinate, we kept our sons intact, we use cloth diapers, we co-sleep, we extended RF, we breastfeed, but we watch too much tv and I totally dig plastic! Everyone has their issues, lol.
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Old 11-21-2007, 01:28 AM   #20
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Re: ARR What to Expect-- need to vent- what are her credentials

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Originally Posted by uoducks View Post
exactly, some doctors are good, some are bad just like with anything.

You are showing NO evidence that these doctors who wrote this book are lying, or bad.

I don't have that built in reflex you talk about for co-sleeping. The risks far outweigh the rewards especially if the risk is suffocation, smothering,,etc.

I am speaking with first hand knowledge of this book. Since no-one here so far seems to actually have read this book....until you have..

see ya!
They aren't even doctors! They have a BA in nursing

I do have this book as well, if this debate is still going later then I'll pull some passages that I can show are wrong. I have to go to bed now.
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