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Old 03-02-2013, 09:57 PM   #1
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Anybody Montessori at home?

I attended a Montessori school until my parents moved while I was in second grade. If course I don't remember much of it, but my parents insist that it was wonderful for me. I've done a ton of research, even focused my education degree towards it...but I find it difficult to apply. If we lived anywhere near a Montessori school, I'd have my daughter in there faster than lightning! I know Montessori is not really a group thing, but I just find it hard to keep thing exciting and different when it's just my 2 yr old and I. She doesn't want to sit still, or play with just one item then return it where it belongs. She doesn't care what is in the sensory bin that week, it's no use to her if the contents of the bin are not on the floor! I just don't know how to approach this anymore. Or if I should just stop now and use an every day, run wild and crazy daycare.

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Old 03-02-2013, 10:29 PM   #2
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Re: Anybody Montessori at home?

Montessori was never meant to be a method of teaching, but is rather a philosophy for lifestyle and a means of teaching homeless street children in olden-day Italy to be self-sufficient and learn from every situation in life. Americans have just tried to squeeze it into a curriculum-shaped box. That box doesn't fit every child, just like the curriculum I use(A Beka) doesn't fit every child, etc. Teach her how to be independent, a well-researched free-thinker, how to love learning, and how to learn from every situation in life- that is the true spirit of Maria Montessori's vision.

Climbing off my Early Childhood Education degree soapbox now.
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Old 03-03-2013, 12:12 AM   #3
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Re: Anybody Montessori at home?

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Originally Posted by KumfyKozies View Post
Montessori was never meant to be a method of teaching, but is rather a philosophy for lifestyle and a means of teaching homeless street children in olden-day Italy to be self-sufficient and learn from every situation in life. Americans have just tried to squeeze it into a curriculum-shaped box. That box doesn't fit every child, just like the curriculum I use(A Beka) doesn't fit every child, etc. Teach her how to be independent, a well-researched free-thinker, how to love learning, and how to learn from every situation in life- that is the true spirit of Maria Montessori's vision.

Climbing off my Early Childhood Education degree soapbox now.
Wow you are absolutely right. I know this! I think I became a little too enthusiastic with "teaching" her. She is already so intelligent and independent, so hands on, let me figure it out by myself. And barely 2 years old! I need to take a step back. Thanks for your wise words
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Old 03-03-2013, 12:19 AM   #4
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KK makes a good point.

My son goes to a "Montessori" pre-school. They only do the class "work" for a couple of hours in the morning. Then they have circle time, outside time, lunch time, nap time, snack time, outside again, then free play with toys, and so on.

When I enrolled him I asked the director about dumping the bins. They tell them "that's not helpful" and teach them to tidy up after themselves. I think they do timeout for not cooperating.

The other thing they seem to respond well to is play mats. They have a stack of those woven style rugs. They teach the kids to get a rug and a bin, then play with the toys on the rug. I think it gives them a clear boundary, which they love.
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