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Old 04-18-2011, 10:30 AM   #1
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questions...ANSWERED YAY.....see post #3

I just got a soap nuts sampler (trying all kinds of new detergents for my CDs) how do I use them?

Anyone compost out there? Is it hard to get started?

Any advice/opinions are helpful thanks!!

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Last edited by tiffysgot5; 04-18-2011 at 05:42 PM. Reason: got my answer sharing the info
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Old 04-18-2011, 01:22 PM   #2
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Re: couple of quick questions

I love love love soap nuts!!! They are very simple. They do need hot water to release the saponins though. So if you want to wash on less than hot, you can make a tea with them- just take four or five of them into a jar and pour hot water over them. I like to stir them a bit, then dump them in the wash. If you don't have them in a tea bag or sock or something you will have to fish them out of the washer or dryer (they are fine going through the dryer)

I use them multiple times- until they turn greyish and squishy. Then I compost them.

Yay compost!

I think compost is easy. Compost happens. Its like a microbe farm that produces beautiful rich luscious earth! It needs a balanced diet of carbon/nitrogen, air, moisture and warmth (it can freeze and pause in winter, but will thaw and start working again).
I do recommend you put it in a convenient place and have a source of carbon material on hand for covering your scraps. Sawdust, twigs and dry leaves and grass clippings, straw, nut hulls, shredded paper etc all work well. Its good to start the pile with a good foot deep layer or so of such material. Then cover whenever you accumulate a good layer of the nitrogen- fresh grass/kitchen scraps etc. If your pile smells it needs more carbon. If you have long hot dry summers, you may want to water it.

You can also put it where you want a garden bed next year and not even have to move it to use it! Research sheet mulch. Helping create earth is deeply satisfying.
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Old 04-18-2011, 05:42 PM   #3
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Re: questions...ANSWERED YAY.....see post #3

I use about 4-6 nuts per load. I use a bag and sometimes maybe I'll throw a couple new ones in there if I deem a few in there are close to being done. I deem them done when they stay sorta squishy when dry. I also sometimes add baking soda to the wash and very often I add vinegar to the rinse. Just so you know its okay to mix these with the nuts.

Did you know you can compost dryer lint? Or any clothing that is natural fiber? Yay compost.

I have done much successful composting without barrels. In fact, my favorite way to compost is sheet mulch which builds a compost pile where you ultimately want the dirt to be- a garden bed. It saves work! But compost anywhere convenient is great.
A barrel will help keep dogs and other creatures out of the pile if that is a concern. If you have a small area or want to keep it tidy, you can make a tube of chicken wire. Keep in mind that ultimately there will be lovely dirt in there that you want to get out. Some folks build a shed sorta thing with 3 stalls, the middle one holding the carbon (leaves, sawdust etc) and then they yearly switch sides. This allows the pile to hang out a year before you use it. I don't think this is necessary unless you are doing Humanure- but thats a whole other topic.

If I have the space and resources, one of my favorite methods is to stack strawbales. Then it is completely compostable. I want to say again how smart I think it is to build the pile where you want the dirt. So composting in a raised bed would be awesome. Its also called lasagna gardening.

I hope soap nuts and composting are as satisfying to you as they are to me.

Thank-you!
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Old 04-18-2011, 05:42 PM   #4
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Re: questions...ANSWERED YAY.....see post #3

yay again thank you thank you thank you!
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If I have forgotten to leave you feedback send me a PM as I still have post partum baby brain

swaggin for amazon giftcards!! http://www.swagbucks.com/refer/plusflve
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