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Old 06-04-2011, 09:07 AM   #21
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Re: vitamin k and eye "goop" at birth

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Originally Posted by Hillargh View Post
Here both can be declined with a waiver. There was a thread similar to this is labor/delivery/postpartum sub-forum, I'll just c&p what I said there to save my fingers some grief. This is why I'm choosing to decline Vit K:

Vitamin K isn't actually natural vitamin K. It's synthetic phytonadione and on the insert it even states "Severe reactions, including fatalities, have occurred during and immediately after intravenous injection of phytonadione even when precautions have been taken to dilute the vitamin and avoid rapid infusion.." And that "adverse reactions include hemolysis, hemolytic anemia, hyperbilirubinemia and jaundice, and allergic reactions include face flushing, gastrointestinal upset, rash, redness, pain or swelling at injection site and itching skin."

Besides the fact that these risks are not worth it to me without reason and it being fat-soluble is worrisome, the chemicals in its makeup are disgustingly awful. I've also known of it causing liver issues (as well as hep b doing this when administered early on) due to the lack of proper liver function in newborns when first born, up until I believe 6 days after birth.


Death as a severe reaction doesn't sit well with me, and isn't something I'm willing to risk "just because," especially when there are things I can personally do to up his vitamin k naturally. If something were to suggest that there may be bleeding issues, that would be an entirely different situation.

The make up of it, risks, and being fat-soluable pretty much sold me against the shot all together. I've heard good things about the drops, and honestly wish they would make them an option at all places that have the shot as well. It baffles me as to why they aren't already

That being said, Vit K is used for clotting. Babies naturally peak their clotting capabilities at around 8 days normally. They also receive natural vitamin k from breast milk, and you can eat vitamin k enriched foods for the time before birth, and during breastfeeding to boost it naturally. Unless my son shows signs of bruising, I have an extremely fast birth, etc. or something that is equally as concerning blood-wise, I won't be doing it. We're not circumcising, so that's not an issue for us. And if we were, we would wait until at least 8 days - 2 weeks after birth to do so.

FDA released information: http://www.drugs.com/pro/vitamin-k1.html

Risks from the mercola website: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/ar...you-about.aspx

This page has a very anti-vit k slant to it, but if you ignore that and look up the sources it cites, you can find a lot of good studies and information: http://www.proliberty.com/observer/19990710.htm

And here's one on the drops and follow up doses/effects/advantages: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/418329_5

It can save lives, and things that are unexpected do happen, so even after forming an opinion and making a decision be sure you've been informed on both sides in case a situation arises that might warrant its use. There are rare diseases that it can help control in regards to bleeding. So make sure you weigh your choices well.

I would suggest looking into the drops, as opposed to the shot, if the possible side-effects/complications of the shot bother you, but you don't want to not give your child anything at all. But as I said, their natural clotting (with or without your help of ingesting/breast feeding) kicks in rather quickly.

On the eye drops: We were told in numerous classes by numerous nurses/doctors/midwives that they are not just for STDs, but for various forms of bacteria in the mama's body that could cause an infection. We're still declining it, however other than varying reactions such as not latching properly, irritation, etc. I haven't really heard of anything that would be considered life threatening or a huge issue health-wise.

HTH!
To the bolded...

Newborns are given a intramuscular injection of vitamin K, not intravenous.

Yes, the drops are used for other infections, not just STDs. Certain infections of the eyes can cause blindness, which is something I would consider a "huge health issue".

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Old 06-04-2011, 09:42 AM   #22
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Re: vitamin k and eye "goop" at birth

there are still risks for intramuscular injections as well.
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Old 06-04-2011, 09:59 AM   #23
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Re: vitamin k and eye "goop" at birth

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To the bolded...

Newborns are given a intramuscular injection of vitamin K, not intravenous.

Yes, the drops are used for other infections, not just STDs. Certain infections of the eys can cause blindness, which is something I would consider a "huge health issue".
They can be given intravenously, intramuscularly and subcutaneously, for treatment of a variety of things. Straight from the box: "Vitamin K1 Injection
(phytonadione) Injectable Emulsion, USP

Aqueous Dispersion of Vitamin K1 Ampul

Protect from light. Keep ampuls in tray until time of use.

WARNING — INTRAVENOUS AND INTRAMUSCULAR USE

Severe reactions, including fatalities, have occurred during and immediately after INTRAVENOUS injection of phytonadione, even when precautions have been taken to dilute the phytonadione and to avoid rapid infusion. Severe reactions, including fatalities, have also been reported following INTRAMUSCULAR administration. Typically these severe reactions have resembled hypersensitivity or anaphylaxis, including shock and cardiac and/or respiratory arrest. Some patients have exhibited these severe reactions on receiving phytonadione for the first time. Therefore the INTRAVENOUS and INTRAMUSCULAR routes should be restricted to those situations where the subcutaneous route is not feasible and the serious risk involved is considered justified."


Also, I was referring to adverse reactions FROM the drops, not the bacteria, as that's what OP was asking for (risks, side effects, and issues with the eye drops and shot).

Last edited by Hillargh; 06-04-2011 at 10:05 AM.
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Old 06-04-2011, 10:04 AM   #24
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Re: vitamin k and eye "goop" at birth

Oooh I don't know what all those big ol' words mean, cuz I'm a lay person dontcha know.
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Old 06-04-2011, 10:05 AM   #25
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Re: vitamin k and eye "goop" at birth

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Oooh I don't know what all those big ol' words mean, cuz I'm a lay person dontcha know.
Lol, I just had a Bobby's World flashback
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Old 06-04-2011, 10:06 AM   #26
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Re: vitamin k and eye "goop" at birth

lots of good info coming in ladies, thanks SOOOO much! I'll definitely be discussing this topic thoroughly with the doc at my next appt
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Old 06-04-2011, 10:07 AM   #27
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Re: vitamin k and eye "goop" at birth

I LOVED that show And I lived in Wisconsin so everyone seriously talked like Bobby's mom
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Old 06-04-2011, 10:19 AM   #28
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Re: vitamin k and eye "goop" at birth

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I LOVED that show And I lived in Wisconsin so everyone seriously talked like Bobby's mom
Bwahahaha! I LOVE it when I get to talk to someone from Wisconsin. I'm sure I'm annoying as hell, though I was just as bad with my ex-dh's family from Boston and getting them to say Park the car in Havard Yard I can't help but be that person when it comes to accents.

(I'm so lame I still have Bobby's World trading cards in a box somewhere )

ETA: Sorry Emily, not meaning to hijack your thread!!
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Old 06-04-2011, 10:25 AM   #29
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Re: vitamin k and eye "goop" at birth

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there are still risks for intramuscular injections as well.
Thank you for pointing that out.

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Originally Posted by Hillargh View Post
They can be given intravenously, intramuscularly and subcutaneously, for treatment of a variety of things. Straight from the box: "Vitamin K1 Injection
(phytonadione) Injectable Emulsion, USP

Aqueous Dispersion of Vitamin K1 Ampul

Protect from light. Keep ampuls in tray until time of use.

WARNING INTRAVENOUS AND INTRAMUSCULAR USE

Severe reactions, including fatalities, have occurred during and immediately after INTRAVENOUS injection of phytonadione, even when precautions have been taken to dilute the phytonadione and to avoid rapid infusion. Severe reactions, including fatalities, have also been reported following INTRAMUSCULAR administration. Typically these severe reactions have resembled hypersensitivity or anaphylaxis, including shock and cardiac and/or respiratory arrest. Some patients have exhibited these severe reactions on receiving phytonadione for the first time. Therefore the INTRAVENOUS and INTRAMUSCULAR routes should be restricted to those situations where the subcutaneous route is not feasible and the serious risk involved is considered justified."


Also, I was referring to adverse reactions FROM the drops, not the bacteria, as that's what OP was asking for (risks, side effects, and issues with the eye drops and shot).
That is what you SHOULD have quoted. What you quoted before is not applicable to newborns.

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Oooh I don't know what all those big ol' words mean, cuz I'm a lay person dontcha know.
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Old 06-04-2011, 06:29 PM   #30
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Re: vitamin k and eye "goop" at birth

I am refusing both.
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