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Old 06-18-2011, 08:15 PM   #11
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Even as someone who does neither, those two things are so not related.

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Old 06-18-2011, 08:16 PM   #12
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Re: Thought you would like this article: Offending a Pregnant Woman

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Originally Posted by CountryChicMama View Post
Exactly. The only thing that irked me was the listing "lower IQ" as a risk of formula feeding. From what I understand/have read, a baby's IQ isn't lowered by formula feeding, but can be enhanced/raised by breast feeding.
but breastfeeding is "average" and "normal" FF is a change from what is biological normal

I am not saying that FF dumbs down babies, just they may not be able to reach their full potential.

I think choosing to FF because you feel like it is akin to smoking while preggo. There are many reasons to do something. "Because I don't want to" really shouldn't be a reason for making any parenting decision. Like, does baby need to RF to three? "Eh, I don't really want to." no... at least make an informed decision.
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Old 06-18-2011, 08:29 PM   #13
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I think choosing to FF because you feel like it is akin to smoking while preggo. There are many reasons to do something. "Because I don't want to" really shouldn't be a reason for making any parenting decision. Like, does baby need to RF to three? "Eh, I don't really want to." no... at least make an informed decision.[/QUOTE]

Wow

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Old 06-18-2011, 08:31 PM   #14
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Re: Thought you would like this article: Offending a Pregnant Woman

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Originally Posted by amiecheatham View Post
so beyond offensive to compare smoking and formula feeding.
exactly.

I didn't reply when I saw this earlier because I was hoping this thread would just die. Since it didn't, I'll just second Amiecheatham.
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Old 06-18-2011, 09:11 PM   #15
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Re: Thought you would like this article: Offending a Pregnant Woman

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Originally Posted by Hillargh View Post
Maybe I'm in the minority here, but I wouldn't consider formula feeding on anywhere near the same level as smoking. While I understand the point, and agree with informed decisions, the comparison is kind of ridiculous to me. None the less, thanks for sharing.

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I agree with this, it's not anywhere on the same level. I kinda see smoking as definately harming your child, wheras FF is ok if you need to but not the best choice you could make(if you can BF etc) if your sitution allowed.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Scarlett's mommy View Post
I think choosing to FF because you feel like it is akin to smoking while preggo. There are many reasons to do something. "Because I don't want to" really shouldn't be a reason for making any parenting decision. Like, does baby need to RF to three? "Eh, I don't really want to." no... at least make an informed decision.
Wow

<3 [/QUOTE]

Also agree with this though. Just too many people don't even try which is a shame. I think at least for the first few weeks, as long as you can it is at least worth a try.


I will add that my sister is a NICU nurse in a different country and went on a BF class. The nurses were literally told that when the parent asks what can they do to help with preemie, the #1 answer is to say to BF, pump etc as esp preemies need it. So IMO, that's kinda hard to agrue with.
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Old 06-18-2011, 09:21 PM   #16
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Re: Thought you would like this article: Offending a Pregnant Woman

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Originally Posted by CountryChicMama View Post
Maybe I'm in the minority here, but I wouldn't consider formula feeding on anywhere near the same level as smoking. While I understand the point, and agree with informed decisions, the comparison is kind of ridiculous to me. None the less, thanks for sharing.
Actually, it's pretty apples to apples.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18951262




http://www.suite101.com/content/the-...feeding-a85064
Quote:
The effects of formula feeding on infants and children continue to be studied, and several significant risks have been identified. There is an increased risk of:

Mortality this applies in Western countries as well as developing countries. For example, according to Lucas and Cole (1990), if all the preterm babies in British neonatal units were fed breast milk rather than formula, 100 deaths a year from necrotising enterocolotis would be prevented.
Asthma and allergy
Acute respiratory disease
Childhood cancers
Nutrient deficiencies: e.g., fatty acids, essential for brain development, and amino acids, essential for central nervous system development, as well as calcium and iron, are not in the correct proportions and/or as easily absorbed from formula as breastmilk.
Infection from contaminated formula
Diabetes
Chronic diseases
Cardiovascular disease
Gastrointestinal infections
Otitis media inflammation of the middle ear
Urinary infections
Sudden infant death syndrome
Necrotising enterocolotis an infection or inflammation that causes destruction of the bowel or part of the bowel.

as well as

Reduced cognitive development


Read more at Suite101: The Risks and Disadvantages of Formula Feeding: Facts About Breastmilk Substitutes Used in Bottle-Feeding Infants | Suite101.com http://www.suite101.com/content/the-...#ixzz1PgixyzRa

http://www.quitguide.com/effects-of-...pregnancy.html
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One of the most serious risks of the effects of smoking during pregnancy is the significantly higher chance of having a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy.

Another complication of smoking's effects when pregnant is placenta previa, a condition where the placenta (the organ that nourishes the baby) grows too close to the opening of the womb, and usually requires a caesarean delivery.

Compared with non-smokers, pregnant smokers are up to two times more likely to deliver premature babies the leading cause of stillbirth and death in the first month of life. Called placental abruption, the placenta separates from the wall of the womb earlier than it should.

Babies of smokers have less muscle mass and more fat than babies of nonsmokers. Nicotine causes the blood vessels to constrict in the umbilical cord and womb. This decreases the amount of oxygen to the unborn baby and reduces the amount of blood in the baby's system.

Pregnant smokers actually eat more than pregnant nonsmokers, yet their babies get less sustenance and weigh less.

The above effects of smoking during pregnancy means a 10 fold increase in the likelihood of carrying smaller babies (called intrauterine growth retardation) and for mothers who continue smoking while pregnant, they risk delivering low-birth-weight babies 3.5 more times than non-smoking mothers with all the attendant health risks.
(When mothers quit smoking during the first 3 months, their babies have weight and body measurements similar to babies of nonsmokers; and quitting before the last 3 months still makes it more likely their babies will be close to normal weight.) (See BMJ)

Testing done throughout life, shows that at the top end of a normal birthweight range, general brightness was higher and children and adults performed better in thinking and memory tests, than those born lighter.

Mothers who smoke while pregnant are 50 percent more likely than nonsmoking mothers to have a child with mental retardation (IQ of 70 or less) of an unknown cause. (See MR)

Testing at age 7 years shows that for a 2.2lb increase in birth weight there is a 4.6 point gain in IQ for boys and a 2.8 point IQ gain in girls.

Especially in baby boys, there is less chance of respiratory distress and complications with a normal weight than with a low birth weight baby.

One of the biggest risks from the effects of smoking during pregnancy comes from the combined effect of two previously mentioned symptoms... low birth weight and premature delivery. 10% of these babies have Infant Respiratory Distress Syndrome, whereby the immature lungs have not developed normal surfactant coating and the air sacs collapse.

Modern treatment has helped lower the death rate and prognosis for this dangerous and heart-wrenching condition.
(American president, John F Kennedy and Jackie Kennedy (smokers) in August 1963 lost a 2 day-old son to this condition. He was buried next to his previously stillborn sister).

Mothers who smoke during and after pregnancy have nearly 4 times the risk of losing their babies to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

If they take up smoking after giving birth, there is less risk but it's still double due to exposure to smoke. This is often caused not only by the toxins in tobacco, but by nicotine itself, which is a potential foetal teratogen. Nicotine replacement therapy during pregnancy is also hazardous for this reason.



Effects of smoking during pregnancy - claim your birthright to a happy, healthy family


Chilling Long term effects of smoking during pregnancy

Babies who survive having to receive oxygen at birth, particularly those who need large amounts because of severe respiratory distress syndrome, can develop long-term complications as a result of:

- oxygen toxicity,
- high pressures delivered to the lungs,
- the severity of the condition itself,
- or periods when the brain or other organs did not receive enough oxygen.

Most of these complications are life-threatening or the baby is scarred for life and may need surgery, often more than once. They include:

Pneumothorax: Air caught in or around the lungs, resulting in sharp chest pains or tightness, coughing, rapid heart rate, lack of oxygen causing fatigue and bluish skin color. Similar conditions, but with air trapped in different places are Pneumonediastinum and Pneumopericardium

Bronchopulmonary dysplasia: A chronic lung condition requiring ventilator support of oxygen often for many months and lifetime management, and often developing recurrent respiratory infections. Babies have to be fed by a tube into the stomach, with high doses of corticosteroids, surfactants and bronchodilators.

Brain Hemorrhage: (intraventricular bleed)

Hemorrhage into the lung: (sometimes associated with surfactant use)

Thrombotic events: Blood clots, stroke, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease, associated with an umbilical arterial catheter

Retrolental fibroplasia: Causes eye problems such as scarring, detachment of the retina and blindness

Cerebral palsy, delayed mental development and mental retardation: Associated with anoxic brain damage (lack of oxygen to the brain) or hemorrhage (burst blood vessels).

Recent studies now link smoking by the mother directly with up to 4 times more risk for development of diabetes in the baby, and obesity and diabetes later in the child or adult. The assumption is that changes in the fetus' metabolism caused by smoking are responsible. Because the effects of smoking during pregnancy can cause a type of fetal malnutrition, this may lead to the baby's body assuming that it will be born into an environment where food will be scarce and lead to lifelong insulin resistance and a tendency to conserve fat. (See D)

Once a baby is born with damage caused by the effects of smoking during pregnancy, it's too late there is a lifetime of regret for the parents. The suffering of their child can be enormous, sometimes for their entire lives, and most parents need emotional support.

Because hospitalization may be prolonged due to the very slow resolution of a disease, the costs on the parents can be overwhelming, and there is also the cost to society for support services, increased medical insurance costs and lost opportunities.

Finally, if a mother smokes during pregnancy and continues on smoking, she runs the risk of not only serious health problems, but also shortening both her life and her child's life. (Fact: 50% of all smokers die early of a smoking related disease.) That child will sadly be deprived of its mother earlier than he or she should.

In a nutshell Want a healthy baby? Don't smoke.

Good prenatal health and care, results in larger, healthier babies and fewer premature births...

...outstandingly brilliant reasons to quit smoking before or during pregnancy.
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Old 06-18-2011, 09:27 PM   #17
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Re: Thought you would like this article: Offending a Pregnant Woman

**Full Disclosure** It took me up through my third trimester to quit smoking with my first child (I cut down and weaned off, but had at least one probably every day until I was 7 months, IIRC). AND 2 of my babies were supplemented with formula. (DS2 refused all bottles of anything, including EBM, and DS3 just didn't need any, as I had a huge oversupply of milk). My first child had formula when I wasn't home, every now and then, and my third baby was a tiny preemie who got formula as well as EBM while I was struggling to teach her to latch.

I do not think formula is poison. I think it's great stuff if you need it. I don't think it's fair to say "It's really rare" to need it. Even if 99% of mothers are physically and logistically capable of exclusively nursing their babies, 1% of babies is A LOT of babies. Hundreds of thousands of babies a year, just in the US.

But logically, all the same, comparing smoking to formula feeding is not inaccurate from a health standpoint. From a moral standpoint, from a realistic standpoint? Totally different. But physically? Within the purview of a doctor, as in the link in the OP? Completely fair comparison.
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Old 06-19-2011, 12:01 AM   #18
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I fail to see how these two relate. A person can quit smoking, at anytime. It's hard, but it can be done. There is no reason for someone to not quit, try quitting, or cut back. However, there are reasons for women to not breastfeed, not breastfed exclusively, etc. and I don't see how equating those reasons with smoking really accomplishes anything. Besides, I don't think it's the doctor's place to make moms feel guilty over anything. Perhaps we should add a blurb about vaccinating and circumcision in there too. All I got from this is we as society should really make people feel bad for using formula, even if we have no idea why they're using it. Not a great message of support. Makes me want to go have a cigarette...

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