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Old 03-06-2012, 05:17 AM   #11
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Re: Asperger's

We're having a hard time deciding if we even want to go down this road. I mean, it's not affecting his academics. He's not unmanageable at home. Do we really need a diagnosis and treatment? Sure, he has a hard time controlling his emotions and is a little quirky, but is it really THAT far out of the norm? Is it worth the time, money and effort to get a diagnosis? I don't really like the idea of him having that label, either. We're just really torn on this issue.

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Old 03-06-2012, 08:11 AM   #12
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And I just found out my insurance will not cover anything relating to ASD. Great.
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Old 03-06-2012, 08:30 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by VinhThiMom
And I just found out my insurance will not cover anything relating to ASD. Great.
Autism spectrum disorders are classified as Axis II diagnosis in the DSM IV. Which means they are often considered pre existing conditions. Which means most insurances wont cover the treatment. An Axis I diagnosis is billable and insurances will typically cover more for those. It's pretty screwed up how this works, and I was pretty appalled when I found out. I completely understand the hesitation to have him diagnosed and labeled at all though. Examples of Axis I would be Anxiety, Depression, Bipolar etc. I'm not sure where RAD lies on the Axis. But if he was diagnosed with a different disorder besides ASD, he could still potentially get help for the ASD just backhandedly for the insurance sake
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Old 03-06-2012, 09:55 AM   #14
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Re: Asperger's

my oldest is an aspie as well. I can tell you I have fought the insurance fight as many have. One thing I learned as our current as well does not cover any pervasive developmental disorder (ASD) coded as a 299.something is that most will cover the initial evaluation of the disorder because at the time you are being evaluated it is not the diagnosis, something simply is suspected to be "off" with your child and the developmental peds and other services are required to test to figure it out. If ASD is indeed the diagnosis them yeah your insurance may not cover it. So look into developmental peds and such to be covered for evaluation of your child, call the insurance company to ask.
OK if it does come back as an ASD then you can still get things covered we are. It all comes down to coding. I have not found a way to get ABA covered but luckily my sons ST in school is trained and incorporates some for all the kids. SO say for example OT, for a diagnosis they can list, poor fine motor skills, poor coordination or similar things that your son may have; they can list the ASD but not as the primary diagnosis code that is key. It is not lying because they are not practicing say handwriting to fix his ASD but rather to fix a fine motor skill deficiency. PT for my son (who also has low motor tone) was for again the lack of coordination and weak trunk muscles, Speech was for pragmatics issues. Currently outside of school we are only doing Psychology and Psychiatry and they first sent the bills in with the ASD first, we have them resent with the main reason we are going listed first now and all is fine, his main reasons being anxiety disorder, mood disorder and multiple phobias.
A note on not getting this looked at because things are fine at home. Things can change in a heartbeat. Thomas was diagnosed at 4 1/2 so early. We did social skills groups and then moved to a new state where he just got barely any ST and OT at school. His ST was only for social aspects of speech as he had no problem talking although he does have trouble gettign words out at times like his brain is spinning too fast for him, its how he describes it. We moved after another school year and have a wonderful school and district he had a few hours of help in his 1st grade classroom plus ST, OT and PT at different amounts of time and did well once he settled into the new school and routine. Home he had always been manageable, we know him and things are pretty good. When 2nd grade started the anxiety went through the roof and I mean to bad levels, we couldnt stop it, we were blindsided. We knew he was getting anxious, we were trying calming things at home and getting school to help when he just flipped one night and my poor little babe was running around his room one night wishing for death to get away from the fears in his head. We have since then gotten to a much better place and he is doing wonderful with both a lot of therapy, school help and some meds. But we were doing everything right and you just never know. If it is indeed an ASD, a lot of those kids deal with higher amounts of anxiety, they are living in a world that is not the same as it is for us and it is stressful. Some can manage others reach a point where they need help (not always as dramatically as my son).

I am not trying to scare you or say it will happen to you at all. May nothing like this ever happen I hope but I dont think ignoring a possible issue is the best. I like to know at least something about what I am up against with my kiddos. Hopefully the insurance info will help, if you need more help with them pm me. Take care and thinking of your family.
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Old 03-06-2012, 04:33 PM   #15
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Re: Asperger's

He wouldn't necessarily need a diagnosis to start getting some help but it really sounds like he needs some help mama. I know he is in private but I'm sure there is still some way for him to get an educational diagnosis of some sort so that he can get all the help he needs ??? Educational diagnoses don't feel like as much of a label. I dont' know private schools well. maybe that would have to wait until fall. I would definitely get an OT eval. A few OT visits can help get you geared in the right direction.

Does he have any friends? At 6 my son was already having playdates on a regular basis. When we would go places (like park or whatever) he would interact with other kids. And this is my oldest who I call semi-typical. He doesn't quite meet the diagnosis fo aspergers but definitely has issues and has an iep at school to address them. What I would worry about is even though he is doing fine in school if he is unable to connect to friends what kind of life is that. His quirks may make it harder for him to handle other kids and for kids to handle him.

And the pp was right that autism is an Axis II diagnosis, not because it is preexisting but because it is a developmental delay. So its in the same category as mental retardation. This is one thing I hope changes with the new DSM.
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Old 03-06-2012, 05:03 PM   #16
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Re: Asperger's

Here's what his teacher sent me last night:


3/5/12
Academic:
Dylan works hard to finish his work without any distractions. He is not usually the first one finished, but he is not usually the last one to finish his work, either. He will often erase his paper if he makes a mistake in handwriting and correct it until it’s perfect.
Dylan also works diligently to be sure that his answers are correct. He asks for help when he needs it. He does not like for other students to look at his paper. He does not want to be interrupted when he is working on his papers. He does not respond well to stopping in the middle of an assignment to go somewhere (for example; starting a paper, going to lunch, finishing the paper). He does not get upset by these things, but he will often continue to work on his assignment until the very last moment when I am calling him by name to line up with the rest of the class or when he is close to getting in trouble for not following directions.
Dylan also colors his paper immensely well. He often colors the entire paper. His coloring is beautiful. He might get slightly upset with upset with himself if he “messes up” when he is coloring. His handwriting is also impeccable. He has the best handwriting in the class. He works hard to insure that every letter is perfect. He loves showing me both his handwriting and his coloring when he does them. He likes to show them off!
Dylan does not always appear to be “listening” to what I am saying. He often turns his head toward me while I am talking to him, but he will turn his eyes away from me. When I ask him to repeat what I have said, he will say, “I don’t know because I wasn’t listening.” He doesn’t seem to know how to focus on me to be able to grasp what I am saying to him.

Social:
Dylan socializes well overall with other students. He has occasional problems with angry outbursts. He does seem to do these types of things mainly when things are not going his way. However, it’s usually when he has been playing with something or working in an area and someone upsets what he has been doing.
For example; Dylan was playing with the blocks last week, and he built a large house/building. Another student wanted to play with Dylan, and he came over with some more blocks to add to Dylan’s building. Dylan yelled out, “No” and became very upset about the situation. Dylan sometimes plays by himself when he is inside. He may play with the school toys, or he may play with his own toys. He sometimes allows another student to play with his toys, but he is cautious of who is lets play with them. He is also very careful to collect all of his toys at the end of recess and put them right away.
Outside Dylan plays well with students as well. I have not noticed as much of this type of behavior outside because the students are almost always running. He occasionally plays by himself, but he usually plays with at least one other student.
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Old 03-06-2012, 06:03 PM   #17
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Re: Asperger's

What specifically concerns you about that report? There were lots of nice things and only a few red flags but nothing major. He sounds like a great kid from that report. Lots of people are quirky. Tell him to go into IT as there are tons from what my husband says. It sounds partly like a good half the people he works with.

If you want services, then go for a diagnosis. If you want medication, then go for a diagnosis. If he needs extra time/special accommodations, go for a diagnosis. Otherwise, just to have the label that will stay with him for the rest of his life..its a personal choice but not one I would probably do. Diagnosis to me is more to get things paid for and so people have a general understanding of what is going on. If you say my kid is amazing, sweet, determined, diligent, and all the other nice things about him but a bit quirky vs. saying he has a form of autism, people get autism better than quirky for some reason. I'd give him a bit more time and watch him. I really liked that teacher write up. She clearly has taken an interest in him, was very clear, concrete and really made it about him. I'm not sure what she's like in real life, but that was one of the nicer ones I've seen.
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Old 03-06-2012, 06:34 PM   #18
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Re: Asperger's

None of that report concerns me. I have no idea why the school felt we needed to see the pediatrician. They said he had 'processing' issues/delays. I don't get that from the report sent. I do see some issues at home, but nothing we can't handle. I just don't know what to do from here. Do I get the evaluation done? Do I accept that he's just sensitive, quirky and a perfectionist? I'm fine with that! He takes after me. LOL
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Old 03-06-2012, 07:20 PM   #19
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It may not be affecting him now but in the future could it?

I know in Canada children with autism receive a specialized program, teaching aide and often different programs in school to help build a specific skill where they need help. Also lots of parent support and resources.
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Old 03-06-2012, 07:40 PM   #20
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Re: Asperger's

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Originally Posted by VinhThiMom View Post
None of that report concerns me. I have no idea why the school felt we needed to see the pediatrician. They said he had 'processing' issues/delays. I don't get that from the report sent. I do see some issues at home, but nothing we can't handle. I just don't know what to do from here. Do I get the evaluation done? Do I accept that he's just sensitive, quirky and a perfectionist? I'm fine with that! He takes after me. LOL
I wouldn't just yet. If the school/teacher is handling it well as are you, then I'm not seeing the issue. You can probe and probe but in less he needs medications/therapy, whats the point of putting him through it. Humm... sensitive, quirky and a perfectionist... sounds like a great kid, especially if he takes after you. Really, it just depends how you look at it. I'm so used to IT guys that is my normal. Most are really decent people and make decent money so I'll take that. He's 6. He's had 6 years of life experiences. That isn't very much when you really think about it. I'm not into all the labeling, classifying, and having to know why as much as the end result and what works best for that child. You may want to mention it at his next appointment. It could be adoption stuff, it could be genetic stuff or it could just be its meant as the special person he's supposed to be. Remember too, if you are saying he takes after you, some of it is just pure nurture and then just consider it as something you are doing right as kids do take on their parents personalities (I so see it with mine).
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