Reply Hey Mom! Learn more about the Gerber Life Insurance Grow-Up Plan!
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-24-2012, 12:16 PM   #1
millermom1110's Avatar
millermom1110
Registered Users
seller
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: NY
Posts: 323
Resources for special needs?

My 4 yr old DS is currently going through evaluations with the school district to see if he could benefit from services. I still plan to homeschool him, but I have very limited experience with children with special needs. I do have experience with adults with special needs...but that just feels like a totally different ballpark. The childhood psychologist evaluated him this morning and said he has a moderate cognitive delay. He has appointments tomorrow with the special education teacher and speech therapist. I believe he will most likely need speech therapy on top of the of the extra help for his cognitive delay.

I was wondering if anyone could recommend websites or books to help me educate myself on this area. Specifically home school related resources would be great! TIA!

Advertisement

__________________
Married to my Best Friend, and Mom to DS (7) DS (6) DD (3) DS (1), Baby #5 due in March 2015.
millermom1110 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2012, 03:54 PM   #2
LunaBirch's Avatar
LunaBirch
Registered Users
seller
seller
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 4,956
My Mood:
Re: Resources for special needs?

May I ask why the public school is evaluating him then? The reason they are doing so is to determine an IEP for him which would provide school services/classroom programming to accomodate him including any necessary therapies.

If he is homeschooled, the school district is not required to provide any services. You may obtain them for fee through your health insurance..

For this reason my 3.5 yo will remain in the public school receiving early childhood services and therapy until I feel like he is no longer receiving services at school that I do not feel equipped to provide myself.

I also have a 6 yr special needs son (with an IEP) and am beginning HSing with him now as he was no longer receiving an substantial services/therapies and from here on I can provide the additional support he needs.

For us, the decision to bring the special needs kids home rests upon when they have progressed far enough that specialized therapies are no longer necessary.
__________________
Mama to 4 Mini Humans Creature 1 (7), Creature 2 (7), Creature 3 (5), and Creature 4 (3)
LunaBirch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2012, 04:40 PM   #3
millermom1110's Avatar
millermom1110
Registered Users
seller
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: NY
Posts: 323
Re: Resources for special needs?

Maybe things are different in your state? Here in NY, the district sends the therapists/special ed teachers right to your house for home schooled students. It's the same for children who are under school age. Once they hit 6-7yrs old, sometimes they will try to pressure you to start sending your child to public schools depending on how home school friendly that particular district is and how extensive the services are, but it is not a requirement. I still pay school taxes, my child deserves services just as much as any other child, ya know? That must be something that differs from state to state, though.
__________________
Married to my Best Friend, and Mom to DS (7) DS (6) DD (3) DS (1), Baby #5 due in March 2015.
millermom1110 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2012, 08:30 PM   #4
LunaBirch's Avatar
LunaBirch
Registered Users
seller
seller
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 4,956
My Mood:
Re: Resources for special needs?

Sorry, yes it is very different here in WI. Under 3 services are provided by Early Intervention.. As soon as a child turns 3 they are transitioned to the school district, an IEP is developed, and services are provided at school for the child. In order to receive those services the child MUST be a registered student. If you choose to homeschool a special needs student in WI, they are not eligible for special services/therapies through the district. NEVER will the district come to a child's home to provide services. You must transport them to the school for services evening if we're talking speech therapy for a 3 yo.

And that explains why DS2 is still in public school.. he currently receives Occupational, Physical, and Speech therapies while attending Early Childhood (basically developmental preschool-- He is about 18 months behind at this point.)
__________________
Mama to 4 Mini Humans Creature 1 (7), Creature 2 (7), Creature 3 (5), and Creature 4 (3)
LunaBirch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2012, 08:45 PM   #5
LunaBirch's Avatar
LunaBirch
Registered Users
seller
seller
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 4,956
My Mood:
Re: Resources for special needs?

Though, I am homeschooling (just beginning to) my 6 yo (1st grade) son on the Austism Spectrum. I don't really find it to be any harder than I suppose a typical student would be.. I know my children well, and as their mother I know their strengths and weaknesses.. I know what sorts of things help them and I tailor my instruction towards that.

While DS2 is in PS, he also is sitting in during HS time and I've prepared a simple surriculum for him. Knowing his developmental delays I'm starting from the very beginning and know that basic concepts will take extra time and patience.. and some creativity on my part. For example: DS2 has struggled to grasp color concepts even though we'd been working on trhem for a LOOONG time. It came to me one day that a visual tactile method may be helpful so I picked up the paint sample cards from the hardware store in the 6 basic colors (red through purple) and put them in a box with 2 rubber vehicle counters of each color.. with those supplies we started with him matching the counters to the cards and saying the color names.. and VOILA.. within a few days he had it down. Of course it also helped that he LOVES anything transportation themed. But really what made it work was combining something he liked with the skill I wanted to teach in a creative manner.

It might take some time to figure out the best approach but you will get it.. Don't stress! You know your child better than any other teacher ever would, and with that you'll naturally figure out how to teach him best

I wish I had a better answer for you, but as a mom to 4 special needs kids.. thats the best wisdom I can lend.
__________________
Mama to 4 Mini Humans Creature 1 (7), Creature 2 (7), Creature 3 (5), and Creature 4 (3)
LunaBirch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2012, 02:51 PM   #6
jen_batten's Avatar
jen_batten
Registered Users
seller
seller
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 4,493
Re: Resources for special needs?

I thought that schools had to provide services for homeschooled children in the district? I know they do here. If you are in a friendly place there is a possiblity that you can get someone in home, but usually you just bring them to the school for an hour of speech once or twice a week or something. I know at least here they are required to provide services if you are "two standard deviations away" from typical development. And you don't have to be a registered student, but sometimes they do get pushy about that kind of thing and make you feel like an awful parent for trying to homeschool a SN kid.

OP I don't have any hard and set suggestions for you. As far as books on homeschooling SN kids specifically I haven't found any. I would recommend reading up as much as possible on your LOs condition if you have a dx and maybe suspected stuff if you don't. There is one book I would recommend for that age with a cognitive and speech delay but before I tell you the title I will ask you to please not be offended because it is a really old book and not so politically correct. But it's called "Play Activites for the Retarded Child." I know that sounds awful and it was kind of hard for me to read at first. But honestly there are SOOO many good ideas that the good outweighs the hardness (for me), and really it would be a great book to use with any kid under 6, even with typically developing kids it has a lot of great stuff for that age, or ones that fall into that cognitive age range.
jen_batten is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2012, 04:48 PM   #7
Hitchkids
Registered Users
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 1,219
Re: Resources for special needs?

Ok, this will be specific advice since I know you off line. Get in touch with the moms in the group in our homeschooling group for challenging kids as they call it. Specifically the mom who works with MODG. I think she can help point you in the right direction. My only experience with kids with special needs is with my younger brother who has autism but it's much different dealing with as a sister than a parent. Good luck.
Hitchkids is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2012, 05:03 PM   #8
satiglenn's Avatar
satiglenn
Registered Users
seller
seller
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 184
My Mood:
Re: Resources for special needs?

Just want to offer (((hugs)))) to you.
satiglenn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2012, 06:27 PM   #9
ChelseaGirl7's Avatar
ChelseaGirl7
Registered Users
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Illinois
Posts: 2,190
I just want to throw this in. my son is asd, I always planned on homeschooling. I got him evaluated for speech at 3 and they said he qualified for the developmental prek program. My initial reaction was to not do it, but I talked it over with dh and thought about it, we decided to do it. I figured it was prek, if he didn't learn a single thing the whole time then it didn't really matter. I thought of it as a form of therapy. Turns out the school was awesome for him! And now after 2 years of prek I am going to be homeschooling him for kindy. These are just our experiances, something you might consider.

Chelsea mom of 4, from my phone
__________________
Chelsea SAHM to ASD Nate 1-07, preemie peanut Emma Lynn 7-08, Clara Elizabeth 2-10 and Jonathan Connor 10-11 Wife to highschool sweetheart Z
ChelseaGirl7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2012, 09:19 PM   #10
dressagemom
Registered Users
seller
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,286
Re: Resources for special needs?

I have no specific suggestions regarding curriculum. It makes sense to me that whatever you choose, your child would probably benefit from a lot of hands-on activities, as well as materials that allow you to work at the child's pace instead of a tight schedule. For example, we use Math-U-See for math. One of the things I most appreciate about it is that it accommodates both my quick learners and my leaners who need a bit more time to figure it out. It is mastery based, so the child does not move on to the next concept until the current one is mastered. It also approaches learning from several perspectives, so it covers multiple learning styles. I don't know what your child's issues are, but I will say that HSing will allow you to tailor your studies to your child's needs. Good luck!
dressagemom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Copyright 2005 - 2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.