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Old 10-15-2012, 06:53 PM   #11
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Not your fault, some kids are definitely more prone than others. I had cavities all the time as a child and i brushed really well because of it. My sis never had any and she would sometimes not brush her teeth for days! I hated that lol. DS is 18 months and is developing a cavity and we've been brushing his teeth after every meal since like 5 months old when he got 4 teeth at the same time! Frustrating! I feel your pain!

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Old 10-15-2012, 07:00 PM   #12
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Re: Dental issues

I definitely say it's genetics.

My mom and dad had horrible teeth, I have horrible teeth, I am doing the best I can with DD's teeth. She doesn't drink juice or pop or gets sweets or anything very often because I want to reduce any damage to her teeth.

I worked with a guy who said he had never had a cavity, but he rarely brushed and he was a sweet tea and pop fiend. There's no way that he should have had such great teeth.
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Old 10-15-2012, 07:01 PM   #13
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Re: Dental issues

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Originally Posted by ChocoMeijin View Post
Not your fault, some kids are definitely more prone than others. I had cavities all the time as a child and i brushed really well because of it. My sis never had any and she would sometimes not brush her teeth for days! I hated that lol. DS is 18 months and is developing a cavity and we've been brushing his teeth after every meal since like 5 months old when he got 4 teeth at the same time! Frustrating! I feel your pain!
how do you know that they're developing a cavity? can you see it?
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Old 10-15-2012, 07:21 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by EmilytheStrange

how do you know that they're developing a cavity? can you see it?
Yeah if you can actually see it its probably pretty bad.

To the pp with the genetic condition, i think that generally speaking, rare enamel conditions aside, most dentists agree that there is not a genetic component to cavities. They are not geneticists, but geneticists aren't dentists either lol! Thats just what is taught. Now that doesn't necessarily make it true, for example OBs have been taught that vbacs are dangerous and repeat sections are safest. Now more and more info is coming out that a trial of labor and/or vbac may not be as dangerous as we once though. Doctors dont know everything, its impossible because things are changing all the time.

I didnt think you were being rude at all! I hope you dont think I am either. Just making conversation. Im so sorry you were made to feel bad about your teeth. regardless of why someone has dental issues I dont think anyone should get nasty and judgy about it. People are so so self conscious about their teeth and I think its just another manifestation of our societies obsession with beauty and perfection.
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Old 10-15-2012, 09:05 PM   #15
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Yeah if you can actually see it its probably pretty bad.

To the pp with the genetic condition, i think that generally speaking, rare enamel conditions aside, most dentists agree that there is not a genetic component to cavities. They are not geneticists, but geneticists aren't dentists either lol! Thats just what is taught. Now that doesn't necessarily make it true, for example OBs have been taught that vbacs are dangerous and repeat sections are safest. Now more and more info is coming out that a trial of labor and/or vbac may not be as dangerous as we once though. Doctors dont know everything, its impossible because things are changing all the time.

I didnt think you were being rude at all! I hope you dont think I am either. Just making conversation. Im so sorry you were made to feel bad about your teeth. regardless of why someone has dental issues I dont think anyone should get nasty and judgy about it. People are so so self conscious about their teeth and I think its just another manifestation of our societies obsession with beauty and perfection.
I have been in tears many times over the years about my teeth as well as my kids. I don't smile showing my teeth and I have noticed my oldest daughter almost 8 doing the same.

Most of the nastiness and grief has been at the hands of dentists and hygienists.

It costs a small fortune to do veneers and even more for caps. We have spent large sums of money just to keep up with the endless cavities.

People assume that you don't brush your teeth or don't look after yourself and it affects your everyday life.

I believe a lot of it is genetic ever rare conditions aside. My brother ( half) who doesn't share that same family has teeth hard as rocks.
He would go a week without brushing( you can see the plaque yuck) yet the dentist would be telling him to keep up the good work and never a cavity.
Me on the other hand am borderline obsessive about my oral care and leave every cleaning with at least a couple of fillings.
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Old 10-15-2012, 11:17 PM   #16
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Re: Dental issues

Our hygienist told us that some of the predisposition to cavities has to do with the composition of the saliva. My oldest uses a top of the line sonicare toothbrush and still has quite a bit of plaque build up each visit, every 6 months. Most of it in the areas where his saliva pools.
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Old 10-15-2012, 11:55 PM   #17
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Re: Dental issues

I agree that some kids are more likely to get cavities than others. My nephew had to have his 4 front teeth pulled when he was 2. My brother and SIL have done everything the same with their second son (extended breastfeeding, breastfeeding at night, allow some sweets, etc.), and he has had no problems at all.

I'm concerned about my younger daughter's teeth because they are so close together. My older daughter has perfectly spaced teeth, but my younger daughter's are all touching, which makes it hard to clean them really well. I think there are a lot of variables at play.
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Old 10-16-2012, 01:13 AM   #18
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Re: Dental issues

Dh has several cousins and family members with poor dental health. Many of the kids have very weak enamel and they just get cavities easier. One aunt has 9 kids. The first 5 have good teeth, and the next 4 with a different dad have terrible teeth that had the enamel wearing so thin the teeth looked skinny and are often infected. All of their adult teeth have come in fine.

Dh's nephew had such poor enamel on his teeth that by 2 they were full of cavities and would constantly get infected. At 3 they had worn down to little tiny nubs in front. So the dentist removed all 4 front top teeth and capped several more.

If someone tells me there isnt a genetic component i would laugh. Through their research and experience many of these family members have latched on to the idea that nutrition is a big part of it. They swear by a diet that is more primitive and wished they had done it sooner to prevent the problems. The diet is also based on blood type.

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Old 10-16-2012, 02:03 AM   #19
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Re: Dental issues

I definitely think some kids are prone to them, while others aren't. I had at least one cavity, if not multiple, every time I have gone to the dentist, and I brush my teeth every day. My son has been like me, and we made sure to brush his teeth well when he was younger, and have him brush every day now. My husband, on the other hand, has only had one cavity in his entire life. Both of my parents have bad teeth, as does my maternal grandmother, so it comes from my family.
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Old 10-16-2012, 07:16 AM   #20
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Re: Dental issues

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Originally Posted by ambieone View Post
As a kid, it seemed I had at least one cavity every time I went to the dentist. And I still get them often as an adult. After I had my daughter, I had 6 cavities!! I had 0 at the visit 6 months prior.

I think some people (not just kids) are more prone to cavities than others. My husband has never had a cavity and his does not take as good of care of his teeth as I do.....so who knows.

Just do the best you can, and I agree about the sealants.
Women often have more cavities after giving birth because if you're not getting enough nutrition in your diet, the body takes minerals from the teeth to make the baby! So the fact that you had more cavities after giving birth is a sign that you're not getting enough in your diet to support both of you.

OP, I think that there can be a genetic component, but it's much more likely to be diet and/or mineral and vitamin absorption-related. If he's not getting enough nutrients to keep his body from pulling nutrients from his teeth, and also getting sweet snacks on a regular basis, he will be cavity-prone. Does he get enough fat in his diet? Many nutrients need fat to be absorbed, like Vitamins A and D (and K). Calcium also requires adequate vitamin D levels to be utilized and stored properly by the body. If there isn't enough healthy fat and other essential nutrients in the diet, cavities are almost assured.

If you want to read some about this, check out the book Nutrition and Physical Degeneration. You can read it online for free and it's really an amazing book. The dentist that wrote it treated very serious tooth decay with nutrition, including cod liver oil and butter oil to provide high amounts of fat soluble nutrients. There's also a more recent book called "Cure Tooth Decay Naturally" or something similar that you might find helpful.
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