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Old 07-30-2013, 09:00 AM   #1
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hems that don't flip over?

All my hems (dresses, skirts, shirts) flip over so the underneath is visible on the outside. It drives me bonkers. doesn;t matter if its woven or knit.. same thing.

What am I doing wrong? I usually iron the crease in, then use a straight stitch to sew, or triple elastic on knit.

TIA

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Old 07-30-2013, 09:52 AM   #2
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Re: hems that don't flip over?

As I understand it, flippy hems can have a variety of causes. I'd switch to zig zagging the hems. Some people swear by adding a fusible web or interfacing to hems, fwiw.
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Old 07-30-2013, 10:03 AM   #3
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Re: hems that don't flip over?

I have that issue if I don't go back and zig zag over the edge of the hem when I sew dd's dresses. If I zig zag the hem doesn't flip.
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Old 07-30-2013, 12:47 PM   #4
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Re: hems that don't flip over?

But doesn't a zigzig look messy? (not judging just questioning?)
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Old 07-30-2013, 01:15 PM   #5
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Re: hems that don't flip over?

It depends. On a woven fabric with a hem that "floats" (bottom of a skirt or trouser leg) the standard is usually a blind hem stitch. If the fabric is really heavy, adding hem tape also helps. (Hem tape is that 3/4 inch lace stocked by the bias trim. You stitch it to the edge of your fabric, then do the hemming through the tape.)

The thing about the zig zag is that it evens out the tension on either side of the fabric. That tension is why knits roll to one side when you stretch them. Ready to wear often uses a coverstitch to keep the fabric flat but have the look of a straight stitch. Check out the hem of a store bought t-shirt. On the outside the stitching looks like two parallel seams and the inside looks like a chaotic zig zag. That's a coverstitch, and it takes a special machine to do it. You can fake a coverstitch with a regular machine using a twin needle and bobbin wound with wooly nylon thread. (I haven't figured this out on my machine yet, so I'm not much help on that front.)

The best blog I've found for learning about garment construction is Gertie's New Blog for Better Sewing. It's focused on vintage patterns and 1940s-1960s styles, but the explanations of how things interact is really helpful.
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Old 07-30-2013, 03:38 PM   #6
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Re: hems that don't flip over?

Quote:
Originally Posted by IndoorKitty View Post
It depends. On a woven fabric with a hem that "floats" (bottom of a skirt or trouser leg) the standard is usually a blind hem stitch. If the fabric is really heavy, adding hem tape also helps. (Hem tape is that 3/4 inch lace stocked by the bias trim. You stitch it to the edge of your fabric, then do the hemming through the tape.)

The thing about the zig zag is that it evens out the tension on either side of the fabric. That tension is why knits roll to one side when you stretch them. Ready to wear often uses a coverstitch to keep the fabric flat but have the look of a straight stitch. Check out the hem of a store bought t-shirt. On the outside the stitching looks like two parallel seams and the inside looks like a chaotic zig zag. That's a coverstitch, and it takes a special machine to do it. You can fake a coverstitch with a regular machine using a twin needle and bobbin wound with wooly nylon thread. (I haven't figured this out on my machine yet, so I'm not much help on that front.)

The best blog I've found for learning about garment construction is Gertie's New Blog for Better Sewing. It's focused on vintage patterns and 1940s-1960s styles, but the explanations of how things interact is really helpful.
ooh will deffo have a look at that, I'm really enjoying making stuff, but just need to nail down the finer bits!
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Old 07-30-2013, 04:02 PM   #7
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Re: hems that don't flip over?

Well, whe. i've used a zig zag stitch hasn't really been noticeable. I use a good matching thread and don't do a close together zig zag. If it will stand out too much I usually skip the zig zag and hope for the best.
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Old 07-30-2013, 05:49 PM   #8
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Re: hems that don't flip over?

I've been doing "cuffs" on everything, including hems on both knits and wovens. The hang flat and looked very professional.
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Old 08-04-2013, 01:15 PM   #9
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I think that you aren't using enough fabric in the hem. I would try wider width. Instead of just ironing a quarter inch twice and sewing, try an inch or so. The weight of the fabric should pull it down so it lays flat
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Old 08-04-2013, 08:50 PM   #10
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Re: hems that don't flip over?

Quote:
Originally Posted by IndoorKitty View Post
It depends. On a woven fabric with a hem that "floats" (bottom of a skirt or trouser leg) the standard is usually a blind hem stitch. If the fabric is really heavy, adding hem tape also helps. (Hem tape is that 3/4 inch lace stocked by the bias trim. You stitch it to the edge of your fabric, then do the hemming through the tape.)

The thing about the zig zag is that it evens out the tension on either side of the fabric. That tension is why knits roll to one side when you stretch them. Ready to wear often uses a coverstitch to keep the fabric flat but have the look of a straight stitch. Check out the hem of a store bought t-shirt. On the outside the stitching looks like two parallel seams and the inside looks like a chaotic zig zag. That's a coverstitch, and it takes a special machine to do it. You can fake a coverstitch with a regular machine using a twin needle and bobbin wound with wooly nylon thread. (I haven't figured this out on my machine yet, so I'm not much help on that front.)

The best blog I've found for learning about garment construction is Gertie's New Blog for Better Sewing. It's focused on vintage patterns and 1940s-1960s styles, but the explanations of how things interact is really helpful.
wow that is so cool!!!! Thanks for the link and all the info!!!!
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