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Old 03-05-2014, 06:13 AM   #11
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Re: Common Core article

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I understand the problem and actually use a math program that teaches that method but in a very understandable way.

For my DD the steps were simple. First they practiced "completing tens", pretty much learning the tens family really well. Then they would get a problem that asked 8 + X = 10. This solidified their understanding of making tens. Next they would get a problem like the one in the article, but they would be walked through the problem. 8 + 6 = X. First they would be asked what do you need to add to the 8 to make ten? The kid would immediately know "2" from all the "making tens" practice. Then they would have the kid take the 6 and break it into the 2 and 4 in a very visual way. The 8 and 2 would be shown grouped together to make a ten and the 4 left over is then just added to 10, so 14. It sounds like a long, arduous task written out here, but let me say that it is much easier to add 10 + 4 = 14 in your head than to memorize by rote 8 + 6 = 14. It becomes so easy and intuitive for the kids and they can learn to add in their heads very fast!

Granted, I'm sure there are many kids for whom this might be too hard or too complicated, but broken down into easy steps my 6 year old had no problems with it.
I think we may use a similar math program. My oldest would have no problem figuring that out. He has known that strategy sine he was 6/7 years old. And my current 6 year old is learning it now.

It's something I don't remember being taught in school but I'm becoming a better math person because of teaching my kiddos!

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Old 03-05-2014, 06:15 AM   #12
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Re: Common Core article

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I actually like that method of teaching math. I been seeing tons of ZOMG common core is evil posts look at how they do math now! I don't think common core is the answer to the education problem at all but the common core isn't a method of doing math or a curriculum it is a set of standards. It purpose isn't to force kids do math in silly ways and have hours of homework. If that is the case it is on the school, the teacher or the curriculum.

The common core doesn't say what curriculum to use. I actually really like the make ten strategy. It teaches kids how to do problems in their head and is a strategy used in a lot of different popular curriculums like Singapore. I don't like that one particular worksheet example but it doesn't show what else they have been doing in class on the concept prior to getting that worksheet. The make 10 strategy is not too complicated for kids to understand. I like when they teach kids what they are doing so they really understand it.
Yes, that's one of the reason I posted for other people's opinions; my husband actually said he thought maybe they were purposely making the math problem look bad and I was hoping someone could clarify. I haven't looked seriously into any math curriculums yet. And I don't know if it's true that she made it look worse than it was on purpose; I think like me she probably just didn't "get" it. But it's more because of lack of clear instructions than this being the problem with Common Core. Not that there aren't problems with Common Core; I'm sure there are good things and bad things about it, as with most things, but I don't know enough about it to have a valid opinion.
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Old 03-05-2014, 06:17 AM   #13
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Re: Common Core article

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Originally Posted by momof3boysNC View Post
I think we may use a similar math program. My oldest would have no problem figuring that out. He has known that strategy sine he was 6/7 years old. And my current 6 year old is learning it now.

It's something I don't remember being taught in school but I'm becoming a better math person because of teaching my kiddos!
Same here! I often feel like I'm learning more than they are!
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Old 03-05-2014, 06:21 AM   #14
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Re: Common Core article

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I understand the problem and actually use a math program that teaches that method but in a very understandable way.

I think it becomes hard to judge whether it is too hard or not depending on how it is taught and presented to the kids. If this is something that has been explained and practiced many times in class, I think it would be fine, but the problem is we don't know. We are only seeing the homework questions without any instruction. THAT I think is where this is going to fall apart. The parents need to know HOW to help their kids. If that link in the chain is missing, it will fail. Also, if the information isn't taught clearly and incrementally, it will also fail.

For my DD the steps were simple. First they practiced "completing tens", pretty much learning the tens family really well. Then they would get a problem that asked 8 + X = 10. This solidified their understanding of making tens. Next they would get a problem like the one in the article, but they would be walked through the problem. 8 + 6 = X. First they would be asked what do you need to add to the 8 to make ten? The kid would immediately know "2" from all the "making tens" practice. Then they would have the kid take the 6 and break it into the 2 and 4 in a very visual way. The 8 and 2 would be shown grouped together to make a ten and the 4 left over is then just added to 10, so 14. It sounds like a long, arduous task written out here, but let me say that it is much easier to add 10 + 4 = 14 in your head than to memorize by rote 8 + 6 = 14. It becomes so easy and intuitive for the kids and they can learn to add in their heads very fast!

Granted, I'm sure there are many kids for whom this might be too hard or too complicated, but broken down into easy steps my 6 year old had no problems with it.
Great post! Thank you for laying it out like that!

I am not liking common core because I don't believe any child is a robot and like any other child. My sons are different and they are both male, and conceived only 6 months apart, and from the same parents. How can we expect complete strangers to be exactly alike? To me that is what the testing is.

As far as the math, I approach the math differently then most people. Then again I approach life differently then most people so I guess that shouldn't be shocking. I ALWAYS had a hard time in math. The only exception to that was high school Geometry. The teacher in that class didn't really teach, and let us figure it out on our own and come to her for questions. I ended up "teaching" a few students in the class as I was able to figure it out faster. However math was never easy for me.

When I got older, I found myself in circles of engineers, scientists and the like. Or at least people in college studying that. I was amazed by their ability to do math in their head. My DH can do several math equations in his head easily. When I would ask them how they did it, they said that they learned the "tricks" to math. This isn't something that was typically taught in school when we were in grade school, they had to learn it outside school. Once they laid it out for me what they do, and how they break down a problem, I too became able to do the math in my head.

So when it came time to find a curriculum for my son to learn math, I didn't know what I wanted, other then to teach him in the way that he learns these tricks FIRST and doesn't have to go through the torture that I had to endure growing up. Yeah math is hard enough without having to learn the hard way. I had DH look at sample lessons for later grades and tell me what he thought.

The curriculum that we ended up with was Singapore Math which this article is talking about. I have spent several weeks with my son teaching him some examples like the one in the article. He is able to do things in his head, that I wouldn't even be able to dream about when I was his age, if not older.

Yes to the outside, these ways appear silly and a waste of time, however if you look at the big picture then you will see that they are actually MORE helpful in the long run.

This may not be the best way to teach math for EVERY child, and I agree that there needs to be some sort of parent education to go along with it, but I do believe it could help people like me, who just develop a mental block to math because the way we have taught math for decades doesn't work for everyone.

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Old 03-05-2014, 07:11 AM   #15
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Re: Common Core article

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Originally Posted by me_just_me View Post
I understand the problem and actually use a math program that teaches that method but in a very understandable way.

I think it becomes hard to judge whether it is too hard or not depending on how it is taught and presented to the kids. If this is something that has been explained and practiced many times in class, I think it would be fine, but the problem is we don't know. We are only seeing the homework questions without any instruction. THAT I think is where this is going to fall apart. The parents need to know HOW to help their kids. If that link in the chain is missing, it will fail. Also, if the information isn't taught clearly and incrementally, it will also fail.

For my DD the steps were simple. First they practiced "completing tens", pretty much learning the tens family really well. Then they would get a problem that asked 8 + X = 10. This solidified their understanding of making tens. Next they would get a problem like the one in the article, but they would be walked through the problem. 8 + 6 = X. First they would be asked what do you need to add to the 8 to make ten? The kid would immediately know "2" from all the "making tens" practice. Then they would have the kid take the 6 and break it into the 2 and 4 in a very visual way. The 8 and 2 would be shown grouped together to make a ten and the 4 left over is then just added to 10, so 14. It sounds like a long, arduous task written out here, but let me say that it is much easier to add 10 + 4 = 14 in your head than to memorize by rote 8 + 6 = 14. It becomes so easy and intuitive for the kids and they can learn to add in their heads very fast!

Granted, I'm sure there are many kids for whom this might be too hard or too complicated, but broken down into easy steps my 6 year old had no problems with it.
We use Singapore math which is a popular math program in the homeschooling community and it teaches math in the same way.
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Old 03-05-2014, 09:02 AM   #16
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I went to all the common core trainings at my school (middle level) before quitting to be a SAHM. In theory the new set of standards are updated and are a better reflection of what skill sets kids need when they leave school. I liked the look of some of the standards we were looking at. I think the method of testing might be rough for a lot of kids. As stated above, you don't get full credit unless you pick the correct reason why you got the answer. Kids especially who are currently in the system will have a hard time because they were not taught like that from the get go.

My feelings on it are meh. New set of hoops to jump through.

My mom teaches first grade and is on the common core transition team at her school and she LOVES common core. She likes that they are letting them (the transition team) come up with their own curriculum. More freedom. She has told me that some of the concepts seem too abstract for the age. She has also told me that her school is pretty divided on hating CC and loving it.
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Old 03-05-2014, 09:22 AM   #17
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Not a homeschooler, but hope you don't mind me crashing...

I'm not a fan of forcing all kids to learn the same way. I totally get the "counting to tens" idea. In fact, I do quick math in my head in a similar fashion. My issue is that technique isn't going to work for everyone. Not everyone's brain is going to follow the same process to get to the end result. And there's absolutely nothing wrong with that. I am not comfortable with students' grades coming from having to follow the same process.

I used infuriate math teachers. They'd sit in the front of the classroom teaching while I'd ignore them and go through the textbook. I'd look at a problem and find the answer in the back of the book. By having the problem and the answer, I could figure out a method for getting the answer. It frequently wasn't the method the teacher preferred, but it worked. I got the right answer, I just took my own route to get there. I understood it better my way. Once each in middle and high school I had math teachers make me retake tests after school in front of them. Being aloof in class and not doing much homework, they thought I must have been cheating to ace my tests. Nope. I just learned in a different method than they were used to.
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Old 03-05-2014, 12:32 PM   #18
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Re: Common Core article

Given that the problem is #5, I would assume the homework would have instructions on it which were not included in the article. Many people would look at the problem and answers and go "huh?" with no explanation on how to do the homework which gets the article attention. If in fact, the homework did not have instructions or reference the lesson from the book that needed to be used to complete the homework, then no wonder kids and parents are confused.

I got it because our math program uses this as ONE of about five or six strategies in learning addition in level B which would be equivalent to 1st or 2nd grade. I agree that not one method works for everyone and hopefully the school that this homework came from will teach the kids various methods. I would think this homework would be appropriate if this was the method they were teaching that day/week.

My 6yo does understand how to do this method, but doesn't prefer to do it. I don't think it is above a 7yo but I also don't think that it is the method to add for every 7yo.

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Old 03-05-2014, 01:01 PM   #19
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Re: Common Core article

I am still not understanding how the testing described in the article is part of the common core standards? I took a quick glance at the common core website and couldn't find anything about the issues discussed in the article. Nothing about using computers to test, about proctors or any of that. Did I miss something?
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Old 03-05-2014, 04:27 PM   #20
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Re: Common Core article

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I am still not understanding how the testing described in the article is part of the common core standards? I took a quick glance at the common core website and couldn't find anything about the issues discussed in the article. Nothing about using computers to test, about proctors or any of that. Did I miss something?
I have no clue. I was mostly stuck on the math problem.

That being said, I did read the rest of the article and guess I assumed that it was implying the testing was part of common core standards. But I don't know.

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