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Old 10-27-2008, 02:48 PM   #1
caedmyn
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need new perspectives--dealing with food intolerances

I apologize in advance for the length of this. DD (almost 3) has multiple food intoleranes and food chemical sensitivities. She started reacting to foods when she was nursing--at 3 months she started having very small amounts of blood in her stools, and I figured out she was reacting to dairy. She went on to react to other foods, and now has a long list of foods she reacts to. DH is very unhappy with her diet and insists that she doesn't actually react to any of these foods and I need to feed her a normal diet, or at least feed her the foods she reacts to a lot more frequently (ie whenever we eat at other people's houses, at potlucks, parties, Sunday school, etc). DD doesn't generally have particularly strong or obvious reactions to foods, so I have difficulty "proving" to him that she reacts to things, particuarly since he doesn't want to admit anything is actually a reaction. He was deployed when almost all of the initial reacting happened, so he never saw most of the reactions that happened when she was nursing. Seeing any sort of doctor is not an option at this point.

So...here is the list of foods she reacts to and her reactions, and how often she eats the foods. I would like to know what other parents would do in my situation. Am I going overboard with trying to keep her from reacting to things? I feel like it's not fair to her to feed her things that cause reactions--I have some food intolerances myself and have had many of the same reactions, and I don't particularly like them.

oats--frequent uncontrollable diarrhea for about 2 days afterwards (I don't give her oats at all)

wheat--she reacted to this at around a year old with diarrhea and a seriously upset stomach and I haven't done a trial since then (no wheat at all)

eggs--causes diarrhea-she still doesn't have normal digestion after the last egg trial I did a year ago (no eggs at all)

dairy--causes mild non-itchy eczema although I stop the trial after it's obvious that she's getting eczema so I don't know how bad it would get if I kept giving her dairy (she tolerates butter and eats a lot of it but doesn't tolerate cream although she won't react to eating dairy every once in a while)

nuts & peanuts--causes loose stools to diarrhea depending on which nut and how often she eats it (trying to avoid entirely for now)

salicylates--this is a naturally occurring food chemical found in most fruits & vegetables, herbs, spices, and honey. It causes her cheeks to turn bright red if she eats too many over a long period of time, or too many in one day will cause her to lose bladder control (I try to let her have as many as she can without causing a reaction, which isn't much, 2 oz. of 100% juice is enough to make her wet her pants)

amines--another naturally occurring food chemical found in protein foods as they age and bananas and chocolate. Bananas cause mild hyperactivity and aggression, too many amines over a long period of time causes mild non-itchy full-body eczema (again I let her have as many as she can without causing a reaction. I give her a little chocolate occasionally but generally no bananas at all as I don't like dealing with the reaction)



So...her diet is very limited, basically potatoes, meat, butter, gluten-free grains (ie no wheat, oats, or barley--rice and buckwheat are fine), pears, celery, carrots, peas, onions, garlic, rutabagas...I'm forgetting a few veggies here. She can have small amounts of applesauce and an occasional bite of other fruits. Her diet is nutritionally complete, though, with the addition of a calcium supplement. It doesn't bother her in the least to eat different foods than everyone else, and if she goes to a party or something I just bring food for her.

I don't need resources or anything like that, I'm just looking for feedback as whether I'm going overboard with the whole diet thing, and if so, recommendations on what to do differently.

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Old 10-27-2008, 03:27 PM   #2
tallanvor
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Re: need new perspectives--dealing with food intolerances

You should try finding a copy of Dr Feingold's book Why You Child is Hyperactive. I think that's the title. It would give you some new ideas of things you could feed her, as it talks about avoiding salicylates and what foods it is in and what foods are acceptable.

I don't think you are going overboard. If a food causes discomfort, avoid it. Sounds to me like common sense.
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Old 10-27-2008, 04:16 PM   #3
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Re: need new perspectives--dealing with food intolerances

Current research suggests that completely eliminating the offending foods from the diet allows the gut to heal; once the gut is healed, the body is better able to process the foods that previously were problematic. So no, I definitely don't think you are going overboard. You are doing what you need to do to keep your child healthy. There are plenty of grains besides wheat that are more nutritious (quinoa, etc). Cow's milk is good food -- for baby cows. Eggs and nuts -- you can get other sources of protein.

Your LO is probably eating a much healthier diet than most other kids her age.

Keeping your child healthy is your job as a parent. Good for you for taking her health so seriously. A reaction is a reaction, no matter if it doesn't send her to the ER.
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Old 10-27-2008, 09:06 PM   #4
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Re: need new perspectives--dealing with food intolerances

Oh, I thought of something else that might interest you. If you've not yet found them, there are some wonderful gluten free cookbooks by a lady named Bette Hagman that also have alternatives to cut out dairy and eggs where needed. Many of her recipes use bean flours, which is nice because it has higher protein. I like that because it is more filling than regular bread/baked goods.
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Old 10-27-2008, 09:24 PM   #5
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Re: need new perspectives--dealing with food intolerances

Quote:
Originally Posted by tallanvor View Post
You should try finding a copy of Dr Feingold's book Why You Child is Hyperactive. I think that's the title. It would give you some new ideas of things you could feed her, as it talks about avoiding salicylates and what foods it is in and what foods are acceptable.
Feingold isn't comprehensive enough for people who are more sensitive to salicylates. It allows too many foods that are moderate in salicylates and it wouldn't be enough for DD. The diet she does is the Failsafe diet, which is sort of like a much more comprehensive version of Feingold as it eliminate more food additives and addresses other naturally occurring food chemicals besides salicylates.
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