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Old 03-15-2009, 01:24 PM   #1
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Auditory Processing Problems

My 4 year old son is autistic and has auditory processing problems. We've had his hearing tested and it's fine. I don't know anything about this. Can anything be done to help this?

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Old 03-16-2009, 05:49 AM   #2
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Re: Auditory Processing Problems

Have you contacted your local Child Find program? If not, they are a great resource and can help you with some strategies.
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Old 03-16-2009, 12:17 PM   #3
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Re: Auditory Processing Problems

Auditory Processing problems are similar to dyslexia, except with hearing. My son is also on the spectrum, and his doctors also suspect there may be some APD involved. However, they told me that they can not reliably diagnose any auditory processing issues until he is older b/c of the type of testing that needs to be used.

How it was explained to me is as follows- their hearing is normal- no hearing loss at all. However between the time the child hears the words and when it travels into the brain to be interpreted, the words get all jumbled and the child has lots of difficulty making sense of things.

Some things they suggested I do with my boy-

1) Keep any sentences/directions/etc. as short as possible. The longer a sentence is, the more likely he will be to grab on to one small piece and only understand that small bit.

2) Allow for a longer processing time. When I ask DS a question I have to wait longer than the normal amount of time for him to process and give me an answer.

3) Use visuals when you can. When giving instructions, it really helps my DS to see an example. I make sure any of his teachers (at school, the YMCA, or anywhere) know that he is a very visual learner. When giving multiple step directions, I hold my fingers up as I list the steps. Example- Hold one finger up "Go upstairs", hold second finger up "get your shoes", hold third finger up "come back down." That way DS knows that he has three things to do and it helps him to remember.

That's all I know for now, as I am still learning myself. I hoped it helped a little!
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Old 03-16-2009, 04:59 PM   #4
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Re: Auditory Processing Problems

My son does know some sign language so that probably is helping him some also.
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Old 03-16-2009, 07:03 PM   #5
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Re: Auditory Processing Problems

my husband and odd both have ASD, it doesn't get any easier when they are adults
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Old 04-04-2009, 02:40 PM   #6
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Re: Auditory Processing Problems

My son is 25 months and is suspected to have an Auditory Processing Disorder (though, he's not on the spectrum). He's been in EI since he was 16 months and has made amazing progress, except for his language. He's got fantastic language skills. A lot of words and sentences, however, he's hanging onto echolalia and has a pragmatic delay (has a hard time answering your when you ask him a question).


From what I was told, they won't officially diagnose them until at least 7 because they could outgrow it, and most likely will (I'm not sure how it is with an added spectrum diagnosis, though). However, you can get a pre-diagnosis. I.E. they'll tell you whether or not your child is at risk. This may help you get additional therapy with EI or your local IU if they're above 3.

Like JAC said, keep things visual, as well as short and to the point. My son is strong auditorally. It's insane what he picks up when you think he's not listening. But visual at this age is best too. It helps them to learn faster. Try to make eye contact with them when speaking. I find that when I can get my son to actually not pretend like he's ignoring me and look me in the eye, he's much better at processing.

There's a really great book out there called "It Takes Two to Talk." Pricey, but I know a lot of people who have had success with it.
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Old 04-04-2009, 02:43 PM   #7
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Re: Auditory Processing Problems

In addition, it's difficult to diagnosis at such a young age because sometimes the problem could be receptive language delay or disability not caused by an auditory processing disability. Central Auditory Processing disability is actually pretty rare and is diagnosed by a qualified audiologist.

Jac - great suggestions
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Old 04-05-2009, 07:59 PM   #8
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Re: Auditory Processing Problems

My 11 year old is in the process of being tested for many things and right now we are leaning towards a receptive language disorder/auditory processing.

If you look at her basic profile, she looks like classic ADD...except she doesn't have ADD. Obviously, I don't want there to be anything "wrong" with her, but I hope she flunks her receptive language disorder testing (it's tomorrow!) If that's what it is, I'm told she could benefit from speech therapy (I think. I've been told so many things that I can't keep them straight.)
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Old 04-06-2009, 12:27 PM   #9
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Re: Auditory Processing Problems

Quote:
Originally Posted by boomer View Post
If you look at her basic profile, she looks like classic ADD...except she doesn't have ADD. Obviously, I don't want there to be anything "wrong" with her, but I hope she flunks her receptive language disorder testing (it's tomorrow!) If that's what it is, I'm told she could benefit from speech therapy (I think. I've been told so many things that I can't keep them straight.)
That's how my son looks on paper too. ADD/ADHD, but it's mainly the language we have problems with.

Good luck tomorrow and I hope she fails. I can't tell you how many times I've thought the same thing when my son had yet another eval. "Fail spectacularly" is what I always tell him.
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Old 04-09-2009, 11:53 AM   #10
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Re: Auditory Processing Problems

Quote:
Originally Posted by gromit0299 View Post
That's how my son looks on paper too. ADD/ADHD, but it's mainly the language we have problems with.

Good luck tomorrow and I hope she fails. I can't tell you how many times I've thought the same thing when my son had yet another eval. "Fail spectacularly" is what I always tell him.
She did, she did, she did!!! Actually, her receptive language score was normal (median is 100 with +/- 15 variant...she scored 108) but she totally bombed the auditory processing part with a score of 65 which puts her in the 1st percentile!!!!

My husband is sad for the auditory processing disorder diagnosis but I am excited. It answer a lot of questions for me. And I am sensing great satisfaction right now knowing that my mother's intuition was point blank. Alisa was diagnosed with anxiety disorder about 3 years ago but I have always felt that there was an underlying cause to it. Now we know!
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