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Old 01-06-2007, 06:47 PM   #1
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My bread didn't rise!...cont.

Okay, I'm going to try making bread again but my 2 questions are: Approx. how long should it take the bread to rise? How do you know how much flour to use (recipe says 4 1/2-5 1/2)?

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Old 01-06-2007, 07:25 PM   #2
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Re: My bread didn't rise!...cont.

Hi!
OOh, I love making bread and doughs!

You should proof the yeast before adding it to the dough. Just in case you don't know, that means dissolving the yeast in lukewarm water (the recipe will tell you how much water) with a little honey or sugar. You'll know the yeast is active if the mixture bubbles a little. Next add it to your flour and mix. The amount of flour to add will depend on how sticky the dough feels to you. I would start with less and add more...until the dough doesn't stick to your hands.

HTH?
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Old 01-06-2007, 07:26 PM   #3
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Re: My bread didn't rise!...cont.

How long to rise? Well, depending of the type of yeast and the recipe you use it could take anywhere from 30 min. to an hour and a half. When it doubles in size is usually when it has risen enough. As far as how much flour, you don't want it too sticky or too dry. Start with the minimum and then add a little bit more at a time. If kneading it in a mixer/bosch it should clean the sides of the bowl. If by hand, it shouldn't stick to the counter or work surface and leave dough but it should be somewhat moist.
I hope I described it enough for you to picture. Bread baking is one on those things that you have to try a few times. You'll get it, don't give up! It's very therapeutic for me (must be the kneading by hand).

HTH,
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Old 01-07-2007, 02:08 PM   #4
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Re: My bread didn't rise!...cont.

Thanks!
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Old 01-07-2007, 04:03 PM   #5
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Re: My bread didn't rise!...cont.

I also wanted to mention that I saw in your other thread you said you used whole wheat flour. I'm a novice, but from what I understand, using exclusively whole wheat flour results in a less-risen dough/smaller bread. Maybe try adding some vital wheat gluten to help soften it up and make it rise more?

ETA: Directly out of my Betty Crocker's Best Bread Machine Cookbook regarding whole wheat flour:
Quote:
Because whole wheat flour has less protein, whole wheat breads do not rise as high as breads made with bread flour or all-purpose flour. For better volume, use half whole wheat flour with half bread flour or all-purpose flour.
And according to Biggest Book of Bread Machine Recipes:
Quote:
Adding gluten flour [aka vital wheat gluten] to a bread that contains whole grain flour, especially rye flour, improves the texture of the loaf.
Quote:
Because whole grain flours are low in gluten (the protein that helps give bread structure and height), our whole grain recipes often call for a little extra gluten flour to help the finished loaf attain the proper texture.
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Old 01-07-2007, 04:28 PM   #6
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Re: My bread didn't rise!...cont.

OP - Oops, I didn't see that you started this post too. I responded to your previous one. I also didn't notice that you'd used entirely whole-wheat flour in your first batch. That would *definitely* cause problems with rising. Like Betty Crocker said you should only use about 1/2 whole wheat flour.

Anyway, good luck!!
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Old 01-08-2007, 11:50 AM   #7
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Re: My bread didn't rise!...cont.

I sucked at making bread the first half-dozen times I tried! There's a family recipe that has been passed down, so of course I had to learn how!

For my recipe, I heat the milk and butter until butter melts. I then add that to my egg/sugar/salt mixture. I let that cool until it is just about skin temperature, or just a tiny bit warmer.

In a small bowl I 'proof' the yeast, as a PP mentioned. I warm a couple of tablespoons of water so they are skin temp, then stir in the yeast pasket. Ad a sprinkle of sugar to that. Very helpful to do this if you are worried about your yeast being old. If it fizzes up, you know your yeast is good.

Once the liquids are the right temp, I add the yeast mix. Then I start to add the flour. The general recipe is 4 cups, so I start with 2 and gradually add more. Sometimes I end up using less than 4, sometimes more. It's never the same. I stop adding flour when the dough pulles away from the sides of my bowl and starts to ball up in the center. Then I let the dough 'rest' for 10 minutes. This is usually when I start to clean up the kitchen.

After that, I knead the dough. Not quite sure what to tell you here, I just knead it until it feels right. I think you kind of get a feel for it after you've done it a few times. Then I grease a bowl up, plop the kneaded dough into it, and cover with a moist towel then set somewhere warm to rise.

A little trick I picked up when I didn't have anygood warm places: I put the bowl of dough into a cupboard with a heating pad turned on high. It made a nice warm area for the dough to rise in.

The bread I make is a very light, fluffy sweet roll. So I let it rise initially for 2 hours, then punch down and roll out and place onto baking pans. I then let them raise another 2 hours before cooking.

I also have a recipe for a honey wheat bread. Your wheat flour breads will definitely not rise to the extent that your white flour breads will. Even using half white/half wheat flour. The dough always feels 'heavier' to me.
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