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Old 05-05-2010, 07:36 AM   #1
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Hospital births & cord clamping

I choose to have my births in a hospital because I have some conditions that make me high-risk, and I live too far from the hospital should an emergency happen (we almost lost our son even delivering AT the hospital). I hate that I have to explain myself and why we choose the hospital, but I have been SO JUDGED and it's been really hurtful. ANYWAY--we have always done things differently in the past...done the routine everything...like sheep led to the slaughter, if you will. We let the nurses bully us into everything that we now stand against. (i.e. immediate vaccinations, medications, pitocin because I wasn't going fast enough for them, blah blah). Well, we have spent the last 2 and a half years researching things in that dept after we had our last daughter (my heart told me this process has been all wrong and there is something better for my babies--and me!--out there). We're wanting to do things differently this time--basically, what would be done if I was having a home birth--just at the hospital. I want no interventions, I want to take as long as my body needs to do whatever it needs to do, I want natural pain relief methods to be offered when I start screaming for pain relief--not immediate needles in my spine or shots in my butt cheek. I am also refusing vaccinations this time. As it is, I don't trust the hospital staff to respect ANY of what I just mentioned...so I worry about the cord-clamping thing. I have had 3 babies and no one ever mentioned anything to me in the past about cord-clamping. Just out comes my baby and daddy cuts the cord a few minutes later. I was asking my hubby this week if he knows when they clamp it, and he said he thinks they do it immediately. One thing I have not found in my research was anything on cord-clamping until I've read a few things on this message board only this week. I am already wanting to not have it clamped right away, and am terrified they won't respect that. So I want to be armed with information to try to help them understand that there is a difference between immediate and delayed clamping. However, I am only just beginning to learn this myself. Can anyone help me by providing, not scare tactics, but actual documented and factual information on this topic? TIA

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Old 05-05-2010, 08:13 AM   #2
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Re: Hospital births & cord clamping

Cord Clamping Danger to Babies
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Wednesday, July 1, 2009 at 8:11pm
By Lucy Johnston HEALTH EDITOR, Daily Express Weekend – Dec, 16, 2007

CLAMPING a newborn baby's umbilical cord too soon after birth can lead to oxygen deprivation and may explain the dramatic rise in autism, scientists have warned.

Groundbreaking research suggests the routine practice of cutting the cord quickly after delivery may reduce an infant's supplies of oxygen and nutrient rich blood in the crucial minutes before they start breathing.

Specialists now believe that in vulnerable infants this is leading to brain hemorrhaging, iron deficiencies and mental impairment, including autism, a mental condition characterized by extreme loneliness and a desire for sameness. Experts say this now affects up to one in 100 children … a sevenfold rise over the past decade.

Last night. David Hutchon, consultant obstetrician at Darlington Memorial Hospital who has studied the effects of cord clamping said: "Babies are being put at risk by clamping the cord too quickly.

"The blood and oxygen supplies in the baby are rapidly decreasing during the minutes after birth. Infants need an increased blood volume to till their lungs and the rest of their organs that are coming into use.

He added: "In susceptible infants, early cord clamping and the lack of blood to the baby increases the risk of brain hemorrhage and breathing problems. This could help explain the rise in autism. Why are we doing it?"

He added that he considered the modern practice of early cord c1amping to be "criminal" in particularly vulnerable and undernourished infants. And he said, "Obstetricians are more likely to clamp early than midwives. It is perhaps significant that autism seems to be more prevalent in babies who were delivered by an obstetrician.”

Umbilical cords are now clamped almost immediately ... before 30 seconds in many hospitals because over the last 20 years doctors have increasingly believed this could reduce the risk of mothers bleeding to death.

However: a growing number of experts, including Mr Hutchon, believe the risks to the baby outweigh the potential harm to the mother. They say at least three minutes should elapse before the cord is cut to allow the mother's blood from the placenta to continue to flow into the baby until its breathing is more established.

Their theory is borne out by recent research. In one major study, involving more than 1,900 newborns and published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, delaying cord clamping for two minutes reduced the risk of anemia by half and low iron levels in the blood by a third.

Eileen Hutton, assistant dean of midwifery at McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, who carried out the research, said: "These benefits extend beyond the early neonatal period."

Another study carried out by Andrew Weeks, and published in the British Medical .Journal had similar findings: Dr Weeks, senior lecturer in Obstetrics at the University of Liverpool and practicing obstetrician at Liverpool Women's Hospital, told the Sunday Express: "I delay the cutting of the cord. This is especially important for premature babies who have fragile blood vessels. The lack of blood supply could theoretically lead to autism.

"There is evidence to show it [immediate clamping] can damage a baby but none to show it can benefit."

Patrick O'Brien, spokesman for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists said: “The latest research does suggest parents should be given a choice and it should be discussed routinely in antenatal classes.”

Birth injuries caused by immediate clamping of the umbilical cord are explained and discussed fully at the following web sites:

www.autism-end-it-now.org
www.birth-brain-injury.org
www.cordclamp.com
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Old 05-05-2010, 08:14 AM   #3
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Re: Hospital births & cord clamping

I don't have the information you are looking for but I am praying for you and your pregnancy. Your post really touched my heart. You sound like you want to do the best things you can and you've not always been informed in the past about what the best was. I can appreciate that. You have a very willing heart to learn and find the right thing for your family. That's great!

If you ever want to chat you can PM me anytime.
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Old 05-05-2010, 08:14 AM   #4
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Re: Hospital births & cord clamping

Oxytocin is also a hormone of bonding- levels are increased after birth when mother and baby are skin-to-skin and eye-to-eye. Oxytocin also causes dilation of blood vessels on the new mother's chest which makes a natural warming mechanism for the baby3 that is more efficient that wrapping (or an incubator)3 4 and that gives perfect skin-to-skin conditions for mother and baby to fall in love, as Mother Nature intends.

For oxytocin to work perfectly during third stage, the new mother needs to feel private, safe and undisturbed at this time. As Michel Odent suggests, she should have nothing to do but touch and gaze at her new baby.5 A warm atmosphere is also crucial to enhance oxytocin release. If the new mother is fearful, cold or disturbed, her oxytocin levels can be affected which can increase her risk of bleeding. We should consider this time, after the birth, in the same light as love-making (when we also make peak levels of oxytocin, the hormone of love) and offer the new mother and baby the same privacy and respect.

With this in mind, I do not recommend clamping or cutting the cord, at least until the baby's placenta is delivered and possibly for an hour after birth. Not only does this activity disturb the sacredness of this time, but it can also seriously affect the well-being of mother and baby.

For example, early clamping (within 30 seconds of birth) can deprive the baby of around 100 ml of blood, and may compromise the function of newborn organs and brain.6 This blood, known as the placental transfusion, is passed through the cord from the placenta to the baby with each uterine contraction in third stage, and is designed to fill all the organs that the baby has not used in the womb- the lungs, kidney, gut, liver and skin. Early-clamped babies also lose the iron contained in the placental transfusion -- which is equivalent to the iron in 100 litres of breastmilk -- and are more likely to be anemic at 3 months.7 Early clamping is necessary for cord blood collection, which is one reason I do not recommend this.

Clamping the cord may also be harmful for the mother, because if the blood (placental transfusion) hasn't been passed to the baby, it will remain in the placenta, making it bulkier. This makes the placenta harder to deliver and can also compromise the mother's uterus, which cannot contract as efficiently with a bulky placenta inside. Clamping the cord was obviously never practiced by our ancestors, nor by our mammalian cousins and is, I believe, a significant birth intervention.

more info http://www.gentlebirth.org/archives/cordIssues.html
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Old 05-05-2010, 08:15 AM   #5
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Re: Hospital births & cord clamping

Early Cord Clamping Effects: THE IMPORTANCE OF OXYTOCIN
One of the most important factors for a healthy third stage is having good levels of oxytocin, the hormone of love. Oxytocin has a powerful effecton a birthing mother's uterus, initiating the contractions of labour and causing ongoing contractions after birth. These contractions are necessary to stop bleeding and to encourage the baby's placenta to separate easily.

Oxytocin levels will naturally be very high after an undisturbed birth, but levels will be affected if the labouring woman has felt disturbed, unsafe or lacking in privacy.2

Oxytocin is also a hormone of bonding- levels are increased after birth when mother and baby are skin-to-skin and eye-to-eye. Oxytocin also causes dilation of blood vessels on the new mother's chest which makes a natural warming mechanism for the baby3 that is more efficient that wrapping (or an incubator)3 4 and that gives perfect skin-to-skin conditions for mother and baby to fall in love, as Mother Nature intends.

For oxytocin to work perfectly during third stage, the new mother needs to feel private, safe and undisturbed at this time. As Michel Odent suggests, she should have nothing to do but touch and gaze at her new baby.5 A warm atmosphere is also crucial to enhance oxytocin release. If the new mother is fearful, cold or disturbed, her oxytocin levels can be affected which can increase her risk of bleeding. We should consider this time, after the birth, in the same light as love-making (when we also make peak levels of oxytocin, the hormone of love) and offer the new mother and baby the same privacy and respect.

With this in mind, I do not recommend clamping or cutting the cord, at least until the baby's placenta is delivered and possibly for an hour after birth. Not only does this activity disturb the sacredness of this time, but it can also seriously affect the well-being of mother and baby.

For example, early clamping (within 30 seconds ofbirth) can deprive the baby of around 100 ml of blood, and may compromise the function of newborn organs and brain.6 This blood, known as the placental transfusion, is passed through the cord from the placenta to the baby with each uterine contraction in third stage, and is designed to fill all the organs that the baby has not used in the womb- the lungs, kidney, gut, liver and skin. Early-clamped babies also lose the iron contained in the placental transfusion -- which is equivalent to the iron in 100 litres of breastmilk -- and are more likely to be anemic at 3 months.7 Early clamping is necessary for cord blood collection, which is one reason I do not recommend this.

Clamping the cord may also be harmful for the mother, because if the blood (placental transfusion) hasn't been passed to the baby, it will remain in the placenta, making it bulkier. This makes the placenta harder to deliver and can also compromise the mother's uterus, which cannot contract as efficiently with a bulky placenta inside. Clamping the cord was obviously never practiced by our ancestors, nor by our mammalian cousins and is, I believe, a significant birth intervention.

http://www.mothering.com/sections/ex...3.html#cutcord

early vs. late cord clamping
http://www.mothering.com/sections/ex...#cord-clamping

umbilical cord issues
http://www.gentlebirth.org/archives/cordIssues.html
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Old 05-05-2010, 09:18 AM   #6
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Re: Hospital births & cord clamping

Wow. I am so upset no one ever mentioned this. I wish so badly I could birth at home or a birthing center (we don't have any here--I hate this town!). Nothing stresses me out more than the fear of the typical disrespect by the hospital staff when it comes to the birth of this baby. It's my last (my body can't make it through another one ) and I NEED it down RIGHT this time.

Load me up with anymore info you have, please! I want it ALL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 05-05-2010, 09:43 AM   #7
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Re: Hospital births & cord clamping

I wish I had known for my son too, but at least we know for these babies! So tell them you will sign any waiver they need and they are not clamping that cord for at least 5 minutes. It is your body. The midwife will just quietly do it this way. Talk to her. Maybe if you don't make a fuss in advance she can just do it. If the nurses say anything just mention a waiver and special circumstances. Most importantly get your hubby on board. He will be the one that can get in the way if needed. Really all you have to do is stall them a little. I am planning to let the cord pulse out all the way if possible.
And know this mama, those of us having homebirths get LOTS of judgment too!! Everyone else thinks they know better than we do right?
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Old 05-05-2010, 11:07 AM   #8
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Re: Hospital births & cord clamping

Quote:
Originally Posted by hadfield531 View Post
Wow. I am so upset no one ever mentioned this. I wish so badly I could birth at home or a birthing center (we don't have any here--I hate this town!). Nothing stresses me out more than the fear of the typical disrespect by the hospital staff when it comes to the birth of this baby. It's my last (my body can't make it through another one ) and I NEED it down RIGHT this time.

Load me up with anymore info you have, please! I want it ALL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Have you choosen a CNM for your hospital birth? Do you have a doula?
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Old 05-05-2010, 11:44 AM   #9
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Re: Hospital births & cord clamping

I had a hospital birth. I asked not to have an iv. I asked to keep monitoring to a minimum, only done when I checked in to the hospital, and every few hours, but only for 15 minutes each time. I asked not to be offerred drugs. I asked to use the tub. I asked to be allowed to eat and drink all that I wanted. I asked to use a birth ball. I asked not to be told how dilated I was (I didn't want to be disappointed if I wasn't dilated much, or nervous if I was fully dilated). I asked to tear naturally, no episiotomies. I asked not to be induced. I asked to wait for placental delivery before cutting the cord (they would have waited but my baby wasn't breathing properly, they waited as long as they could).

I got all that I asked for. I went 2 weeks past my due date without pressure for a c-section/induction. I refused vaccinations at the hospital (although I got them 2 weeks later at the pediatrician, but I wanted to wait).

HOWEVER, it was because at 38 weeks pregnant, I changed doctors. My old doctor thought I would "give in" to the drugs and he mocked me for wanting a natural birth. The new doctor was all for it, and his theory was that everyone should be capable of a natural birth, unless something is wrong physically with mom or baby. He also does not attend the birth unless there is a medical need. He has midwives that deliver the babies, and he only shows up if a doctor is needed for a cesarean or something like that. Like he said, he is a trained surgeon/obgyn, and an obgyn/surgeon is not needed at a natural birth.

The hospital told me that it was hospital policy for all women to get an iv and that no eating/drinking was allowed. But I found out that in the end, it's the doctor's call, not the hospital. If your doc says you don't need an iv, the hospital cannot force it on you. The doctor has final say, so make sure your doctor is willing to meet your needs.

I refused to get an iv, despite being in labor more than 24 hours. I ate and drank what I could (more drinking, I had no appetite while having contractions). I also did not get pain killers. I tore naturally, and refused pain killers when they stitched me up, because I figured I had already been through birth, what's a bit more pain.

It was my first child. I had severe back pain. But it can be done. It is your choice. Theere is no "law" forcing you to get iv and interventions. "policy": is not synonymous to "law". Offer to sign a waiver if they give you a hard time. Get a doula to remind you and hospital staff of your birth plan.

Good luck.

Additional note: They would have waited to clamp/cut the cord until after the placenta delivered, but there had been meconium in my water, so when they placed him on me, he wasn't crying. They tried to get him cleaned up while on me (still attached to the cord) but when he didn't cry, they thought he may have inhaled meconium, and they asked who was cutting the cord (my hubby refused, so my doula did it) and then took him to the table in our room. Luckily, when they put him down, he started crying on his own, so they were able to bring him right back to me immediately. He never left the room. Despite the breathing problem that they thought he had, they still did not "rush" to cut the cord, and waited as long as possible, and let us participate.

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Old 05-05-2010, 12:23 PM   #10
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Re: Hospital births & cord clamping

PS--> I chose a hospital birth, not because I was high risk, but because I didn't know anyone who had had a home birth in this area, my hubby would never had known what to do in a home birth, and there were no birthing centers in my area. I was afraid of something going wrong, not to mention the mess! Yes, midwives can help clean, but finding a midwife in this area that does home births is near impossible.
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